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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted -  11/10/2011  :  15:24
Khaki in colour and sombre in content. "Cravens Part in the Great War", there will not have been many households in Barlick and what was then a much larger Craven Area, that did not have at least one copy of this book. In my immediate Family there would have been at least four and I still have two of them, albeit that one is with my son on Anglesey. Over the years I have seen them at jumble sales, in second hand shops and in piles of rubbish for disposal, even left behind when a house has been vacated. They will have turned up all over the place, I have come across them in Wales, the Isle of Wight and Hampshire, the two that I have belonged to my Father and Maternal Grandfather.
Many years ago I went through one of them from cover to cover noting those from Barlick who had given their lives in the service of King and Country, my notes are long gone so I am going to do it again, a few pages at a time, but this time I will include other local places within an approximate seven mile radius, Gisburn, Foulridge, Earby and so on. I will post my findings on here with the name, address and a precis of other details, as some are quite extensive, each name is to have the page number for my reference so that if anyone wants further information, I can soon find it. In a good number of cases there is a photograph, these I will copy and post in groups of ten at suitable intervals. In the book there are 391 pages so I will use a few abreviations hopefully all self explanatory, ie, KIA:- Killed in Action. MPD:- Missing presumed Dead. DOW:- Died as a result of Wounds, and one that is all too frequent, DFD:- Died from Disease or Illness.
One Man was responsible for the existance of these books and that was Mr, Walter Morrison Esq, JP of Malham Tarn who put forward the idea of the book and defrayed the entire cost.
There is quite a bit about the war itself up to page 50, including the Rohilla Tradgedy, then comes the dreadful list of those who did not come home, and so it is that on page 57 we find the first of Barlicks Sons, and is as follows:-

2nd Lieut Harry Thornton Pickles, 3rd Bn Duke of Wellington's (West Riding) Regiment (SR) second son of Mr Stephen Pickles JP, CC, Of Raysgill Barnoldswick KIA 26th April 1916 aged 26. P57.

In these first ten pages the extent of family loss is made very clear for it was in the Village of Carleton nr Skipton that this comes up:-

P53,  Lieut. Anthony E.K. Slingsby, 1/6th Duke of Wellington's (WR) Regiment, Son of Mr and Mrs J A Slingsby Carla Beck Carleton. KIA France 14th July 1915. Aged 26.
P57,  Captain Arthur Morris Slingsby, MC 56th Punjabi Rifles,  2nd son of Mr and Mrs J A Slingsby KIA 8th March 1916 in Mesopotamia. Aged 30.
P58.  Lieut. Stephen Slingsby of HMS Defence, 4th son of Mr and Mrs J A Slingsby. KIA in North Sea June 1916. Aged 24.
This out of a total of five sons all serving.
 
Lothersdale is the next local Village with on P62.  Lieut Alec Wilson, 1st Herefordshire Regiment, Son of Mr and Mrs F J Wilson JP of Lothersdale. KIA 26th March 1917 in Egypt.
P54, Lieut. The Hon, C. A. Lister Royal Marines, Hood Battalion, Only surviving son and heir of Lord Ribblesdale of Gisburne Park DOW 28th August 1915. Elder Brother killed in 1904 in Somaliland.
Greystones, Gisburn.  Lieut. George Proctor, Lancs Fusiliers, only son of Mr and Mrs Thomas Proctor. KIA 7th April 1918 aged 24. P70.
Marton is on P73, Which Marton is not clear,  2nd Lieut, Joseph Bryan Bushby South Staffs Regiment, son of Mr and Mrs Joseph Bushby, Schoolhouse Farm Marton, DOW, 4th October 1918 aged 26.



Ed

Edited by - thomo on 11/10/2011 4:05:43 PM


thomo
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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 05/11/2011 : 08:59
Surname: BARRETT

Forename(s): Peter

Place of Birth: Cononley, Yorkshire

Residence: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Service No: 88959

Rank: Gunner

Regiment/Corps/Service: Royal Garrison Artillery

Battalion/Unit: 192nd Heavy Bty.

Division: not applicable

Age: 29

Date of Death: 1918-06-18

Awards: -----

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: 263

CWGC Cemetery: MIKRA BRITISH CEMETERY, KALAMARIA

CWGC Memorial: -----

Non-CWGC Burial: -----

Comments:

1901 Nelson Census: 11, Chatham Street - Peter Barrett, aged 12, born Cononley, son of John and Jane Barrett.

Not on local memorial.


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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 05/11/2011 : 09:02
Surname: BARTER

Forename(s): Henry James

Place of Birth: Worcester, Worcestershire

Residence: -----

Service No: M/10069

Rank: Junior Reserve Attendant

Regiment/Corps/Service: Royal Naval Auxiliary Sick Berth Reserve

Battalion/Unit: H.M.H.S. 'Rohilla'

Division: not applicable - Royal Navy

Age: 29

Date of Death: 1914-10-30

Awards: -----

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: 6958.

CWGC Cemetery: WORCESTER (ASTWOOD) CEMETERY

CWGC Memorial: -----

Non-CWGC Burial: -----

Comments:

No entry in SD - Navy.

1901 Worcester Census: Cannon Street - Henry James Barter, aged 16 years, born Worcester, son of Elias Ch. and Anne Barter.

1911 Cirencester Census: 12, King Street - Henry Barter, insurance agent, aged 26 years, born Worcester, husband of Minnie Barter. [Henry and Minnie were living with her brother, Alfred Bright.]

Craven's Part in the Great War Entry:

PTE. H. BARTER, 41, Skipton Road, Barnoldswick married.

 

West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record Entry:

BARTER, H., 41, Skipton Road, [Barnoldswick], married, no children. The above resided at Barnoldswick, being a member of the local branch of the St. John Ambulance Association, who were drowned when the 'Rohilla', a hospital ship on which they were serving as members of the Naval Sick Berth Reserve, went ashore at Whitby on October 30, 1914


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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 05/11/2011 : 09:07
Surname: BELL

Forename(s): John

Place of Birth: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Residence: -----

Service No: 7022

Rank: Private

Regiment/Corps/Service: King's Own (Yorkshire Light Infantry)

Battalion/Unit: 1/5th Battalion

Division: 49th (West Riding) Division

Age: 24

Date of Death: 1916-11-03

Awards: -----

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: VIII. D. 159.

CWGC Cemetery: BOULOGNE EASTERN CEMETERY

CWGC Memorial: -----

Non-CWGC Burial: -----

Comments:

1901 Barnoldswick Census: John Bell, age 8 years, born Barnoldswick, Yorkshire, son of Joseph and Fanny Bell.

Craven's Part in the Great War Entry:

PRIVATE JOHN BELL, K.O.Y.L.1., son of Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Bell, 12, Denton Street, Barnoldswick, died of wounds 3rd November, 1916. Aged 24 years

West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record Entry:

BELL, John, aged 24, K.O.Y.L.I., son of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Bell, 12, Denton Street, [Barnoldswick], died of wounds Nov. 3, 1916.

BARNOLDSWICK CASUALTIES
Private John Bell, K.O.Y.L.I., who was wounded a second time on the 28th ult., has had one arm amputated at a Casualty Clearing Station in France. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Bell, 12, Denton Street, Barnoldswick, who have another son in France. In a letter to the bereaved parents notifying the transfer of their son to the base hospital, a nursing sister wrote:- "He was progressing very well, but I am sorry to say he had to lose one arm the day before he left us, as it was not doing very well and was endangering his life." Mr. Bell, the father, was himself only discharged from the Army six weeks ago.

Article Date: 24 November 1916
BELL - November 3, 1916, at the General Hospital, Boulogne, from wounds received in action, Pte. John Bell, K.O.Y.L.I., son of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Bell, 12 Denton Street, Barnoldswick, aged 24 years.

Article Date: 24 November 1916
MORE BARLICKIANS PAY THE PRICE - PRIVATE JOHN BELL
News of the death of two more Barnoldswick soldiers was received on Friday last. Private John Bell, K.O.Y.L.I., who was severely wounded on the 28th ult., and had an arm amputated at a Casualty Clearing Station, succumbed to his injuries in the General Hospital at Boulogne on November 3rd. He was 24 years of age.
Private Bell was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Bell, 12, Denton Street, Barnoldswick. He had been in France four months, and had been slightly wounded previously. Before joining the Army he was employed by Messrs. J. Sagar & Sons, Bankfield Shed. In a letter to the bereaved parents, C.Q.M.S. Livsey, of the same regiment writes:- "He was working with the Royal Engineers in a village, and was carrying some articles to be used in the front line trench when a German shell burst overhead, and a piece of shell caught him and gave him a nasty blow."
Another member of the same family is serving at the Front, and the father was recently discharged as a time-expired man.

Article Date: 10 November 1916


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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 05/11/2011 : 09:10
Surname: BENTHAM

Forename(s): John

Place of Birth: Horton-in-Ribblesdale, Yorkshire

Residence: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Service No: 32554

Rank: Private

Regiment/Corps/Service: Prince of Wales's (North Staffordshire Regiment)

Battalion/Unit: 2nd Battalion

Division: 1st (Peshawar) Indian Division

Age: 30

Date of Death: 1918-10-27

Awards: -----

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: Face 23.

CWGC Cemetery: -----

CWGC Memorial: DELHI MEMORIAL (INDIA GATE)

Non-CWGC Burial: -----

Comments:

The 2nd Bn Prince of Wales's (North Staffordshire Regiment) was in India throughout the war.

Craven's Part in the Great War Entry:

PRIVATE JOHN BENTHAM, of Aynham Farm, Barnoldswick, died of pneumonia in India. Aged 30 years.
West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record Entry:

BENTHAM, John, aged about 30, late of Aynhams Farm, [Barnoldswick], and 38, Westwood Street, Accrington, died from pneumonia, India, Nov. 1918. BENTHAM, John, aged 30, formerly of Aynhams' Farm, [Barnoldswick], died from pneumonia, India

Article Date: 06 December 1918
BARNOLDSWICK - MORE CASUALTIES: Private John Bentham
News his been received of the death in India, from pneumonia, of Private John Bentham, late of Aynham Farm, Barnoldswick. He had served in India two years, and was about 30 years of age. His wife now resides at 38 Westwood Street, Accrington. Private Bentham was a respected member of the Barnoldswick Conservative Club.

Article Date: 06 December 1918
Barnoldswick Soldier's Death in India
News has been received of the death in India, from pneumonia, of Pte. John Bentham, late of Aynhams Farm, Barnoldswick. He served in India two years, and was about 30 years of age. His wife now resides at 38, Westwood Street, Accrington


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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 05/11/2011 : 09:16
Surname: BENTHAM

Forename(s): John

Place of Birth: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Residence: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Service No: 4828

Rank: Corporal

Regiment/Corps/Service: East Lancashire Regiment

Battalion/Unit: 2nd Battalion

Division: 8th Division

Age: 22

Date of Death: 1916-07-30

Awards: -----

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: V. G. 58.

CWGC Cemetery: BETHUNE TOWN CEMETERY

CWGC Memorial: -----

Non-CWGC Burial: -----

Comments:

-----

 

 

Craven's Part in the Great War Entry:

CORPORAL JOHN BENTHAM, Last Lancs. Regt., son of Mrs. J. Bentham, 52, Esk Lane, Barnoldswick, died 30th July, 1916. Aged 22 years.

 

West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record Entry:

BENTHAM, Corporal J., aged 22 years, East Lancs. Regt., son of Mrs. J. Bentham, 52, Esp Lane, [Barnoldswick], died of wounds, July 30, 1916

Article Date: 03 December 1915
SLANDER ON AN EARBY SOLDIER REFUTED
Corpl. J. Bentham, D Co., 13th Platoon, 2nd East Lancashire Regiment, of Barnoldswick, writes to "Dear Editor and Readers of the Pioneer":-
"I have just been informed that lately a rumour has been about Earby and district that 11083 Private John Milne has deserted his regiment, but upon my honour I say it is not true. He has been in my section for the last eight months, and I can say that he has always done his duty while he has been with me. He was very much upset when he got the news, for he told me he had no intention of deserting after doing 12 months out here. I don't suppose the person or persons who set this rumour out has seen the Back never mind the Front, or they would not talk like that. The same Private Milne has seen 12 months' active service, and was only 17 years of age when he came out. He has been wounded three times during the period of this war, and if the person or persons don't keep their mouths closed the matter will be placed in higher hands."

PETTY SESSIONS - SKIPTON - Argument Leads To Fighting
Charges of drunkenness and disorderly conduct were preferred against John Bentham, soldier, and Ellis Kaye, weaver, both of Barnoldswick. Kaye did not appear. The defendants were going in the direction of Salterforth on Sunday night, the 7th inst., and were arguing a point. They were seen by P.C. Callear and he, thinking there would be trouble, followed them. Shortly after the two defendants commenced fighting and used obscene language. Both were very drunk. - Replying to Supt. Vaughan , Bentham said he had been fighting at the front and came home on sick leave in December. - Supt. Vaughan: Seeing that he is fighting for our country I am willing to withdraw the case on payment of costs.
The defendant added that he was going to rejoin his regiment - East Lancashires - on Sunday.
The Chairman: We wish you luck. The case will be dismissed on payment of costs. Kaye was fined 5s. and costs.

Article Date: 18 August 1916
BENTHAM - July 30th died from wounds received in action in France, Corpl. John Bentham, 2nd East Lancs, son of Mrs. J. Bentham, 52 Esp Lane, Barnoldswick, aged 22 years.

Article Date: 18 August 1916
BARNOLDSWICK - A RESERVIST DIES FROM WOUNDS
Mrs. J. Bentham, 52, Esp Lane, Barnoldswick, received an official intimation on Wednesday of the death of her son, Corporal John Bentham, 2nd East Lancs., which took place from wounds in France at a place not stated on July 30th. He was 22 years of age, and a reservist called up on the first mobilization. The last communication his mother received from him was a field card dated July 27th. He was home on a week's furlough in March. A weaver by trade, he worked for Messrs. Sagar and Sons, Bankfield, but at the time he was recalled to the Colours he was employed by Messrs. Dent and Sons, contractors. Mrs. Bentham has another son out in France, from whom she has not heard for several months.


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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 05/11/2011 : 09:48
Surname: BLEZZARD

Forename(s): Joseph

Place of Birth: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Residence: -----

Service No: S/13253

Rank: L/Corporal

Regiment/Corps/Service: Seaforth Highlanders (Ross-Shire Buffs, The Duke of Albany's)

Battalion/Unit: 7th (Service) Battalion

Division: 9th (Scottish) Division

Age: --

Date of Death: 1916-10-10

Awards: -----

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: Pier and Face 15 C.

CWGC Cemetery: -----

CWGC Memorial: THIEPVAL MEMORIAL

Non-CWGC Burial: -----

Comments:

1901 Barnoldswick Census: Joseph Blezzard, aged 9 years, born Barnoldswick, son of Hannah Blezzard, widow.

Not on local memorial.



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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 05/11/2011 : 09:53
This is a long one but well worth a good read:-

Surname: BOLTON

Forename(s): James

Place of Birth: Walsden, Lancashire

Residence: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Service No: 10487

Rank: Sergeant

Regiment/Corps/Service: Border Regiment

Battalion/Unit: 2nd Battalion

Division: 7th Division

Age: 27

Date of Death: 1917-10-26

Awards: -----

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: Panel 85 to 86.

CWGC Cemetery: -----

CWGC Memorial: TYNE COT MEMORIAL

Non-CWGC Burial: -----

Comments:

Brother-in-law of John Fawcett (8855).
 

Craven's Part in the Great War Entry:

SERGEANT JAMES BOLTON, Border Regt., of 40, Wellington Street, Barnoldswick, officially presumed killed 26th October, 1917. Aged 27 years.

 

 

Craven Herald.

Article Date: 13 November 1914
BARNOLDSWICK PRIVATE'S EXPERIENCES - Story of German Treachery
In a letter to his father (Mr. T. Bolton, 15, Gisburn Street), dated Nov. 8th, Private James Bolton, of the King's Own Scottish Borderers, writes:-
"Just a few lines to let you know I have not forgotten you. After fifteen days and nights fighting I found myself knocked out with a bullet through my arm. I am doing as well as can be expected: don't you worry. I saw one or two of the Germans off before they got me. My word! But the sights you see out here are awful. It is a pity to see the Belgian villages shattered and burnt to the ground.
We lost a good old Major by a cowardly German trick. We were fighting in the trenches when we heard them shouting "We want to surrender! me English waites!" [waiter] So the Major went out to see them, and as soon as he got up to them they blew his face off. We jolly soon routed them after that. They didn't get the chance to surrender. All who didn't escape were killed. They called him Major Allen, D.S.O. [Major William Lynn Allen, 2nd Bn. Border Regiment, killed, 28 October 1914.]
The Germans have splendid artillery-those big shells of theirs make a hole in the ground you could put a tram car in. If one of them bursts within ten yards of a trench all the trench falls in, and then you are busy digging yourself out. I was cooking my bacon one morning at the back of a cottage when a shell plumped in the ground not three yards away, but thank goodness it didn't burst, or I shouldn't have been here now.
I would dearly like to tell you the names of a few places I have been to, but we are not allowed. But if God spares me I shall be able to tell you a fine story-but that can wait. So I will now close, hoping and trusting that this finds you and all at home in the best of health, as it leaves me at present."

 

Article Date: 04 December 1914
TURCOS' GRIM MEMENTOES - Wounded Barnoldswick Soldier's Letter from the Front
In a letter recently received by his father, Mr. T. Bolton, 25, Gisburn Street, Pte. J. Bolton, of the 2nd Border Regiment, writing from the Convalescent Camp, at Rouen, France, says:-
I am getting along fine now. I have just been dismissed hospital, and am now in the Convalescent Camp. The wound is doing fine. It is healing up champion, but it has left my thumb and first finger rather stiff. I fancy the bullet must have just caught the guiders. Anyhow, the doctor says it will be alright in a day or two, so I suppose I shall get dismissed altogether in about ten days; then I shall get to the base, and from there to the firing line again. I was rather unfortunate in not getting sent to England, as it is jolly cold out here at present. I don't know what it is like in England, but I do know it will be a good job when it is all over.
You see some awful sights out here. I remember just after a bayonet charge down at-(tell you some other time) by the Turcos, those French Algerians, it was awful. They neither look for nor give quarter. Well, just after they had reformed, you would see some of them with German heads in their haversacks; two of them had a sting of ears they had cut off, and they cried like children when their officers took them off 'em. And yet they are a fine lot of chaps. They care nothing-they think if they die fighting they will live ever after. A queer lot of chaps to have for an enemy, I can assure you.
The officer I was servant to-Mr. Bevis-has got shot in the legs, but I believe he is doing well. He was a good friend to me, and I hope he gets over it. You might make me up a little parcel of envelopes and writing paper, and (if you can afford it) a few packets of Woodbines-I will repay you some fine day

 

Article Date: 30 April 1915
BARNOLDSWICK - War Trophies
Mr. Maitland Livsey has this weak displayed in his shop window a massive nickel-plated helmet taken from a Prussian officer. In a letter to his father, Mr. J. Bolton, Gisburn Street, Private James Bolton, of the Machine Gun Section Border Regiment, Seventh Division, who been at the front since the early stages of the war, enclosed a spent German bullet, from which he escaped serious injury through the intervention of a tin box he was carrying. "You will notice how the bottom of the bullet is torn open, while the nose is complete. I had the lead and aluminium tip from inside it, but sorry to say I lost them. If you get this all right save it for me - I shall have it mounted on my watch-chain. The position I was carrying the box in was that it hung just above my knee, and if it hadn't been for the end of the box I should have had the bullet in my knee - a very nasty place to have one. I have had one in the arm and I don't want another I can assure you

 

Article Date: 20 August 1915
TEN MONTHS IN THE FIRING LINE - Barnoldswick Soldier's Vivid Recollections
Pte. James Bolton, of the 2nd Battalion Border Regiment (Machine Gun Section), who came home on furlough last week, narrated a few of his indelible impressions of the war to a 'CRAVEN HERALD' representative before returning to the front on Wednesday morning. He is one of three soldier sons of Mr. Thos. Bolton, 25 Gisburn Street, Barnoldswick. The 2nd Battalion Borderers, in which private Bolton is the only 'Barlicker,' is not to be confused with the Scottish Borderers, being mainly recruited from the counties of Cumberland and Westmorland, and, as will be gathered from the following remarks, the regiment has won its share of glory, especially during the earlier stages of the war. Private Bolton looked the picture of health despite the trying experiences through which he has passed. Discussing the rigours of trench warfare last winter (after recovering from a bullet through his forearm) he paid a grateful tribute to the recuperative effect of the daily ration of rum served out to the troops, and dismissed the arguments of teetotal faddists with, a contemptuous "Let them go and try it!"
The Regiment left England on the 4th October, arriving in Belgium on the 6th. At Bruges they received a boisterous welcome from the townspeople, and after spending the night in a Catholic School left the following morning for Antwerp. After two days' march, however, they came across the Belgian Army retreating, and acted as rearguard. This was the time of the Naval Brigade's evacuation of Antwerp. The Borderers retired to Ostend where, after receiving ammunition, they entrained for Ghent. The advance guard of the German Army being reported at Thorout, they retreated three hours before the enemy forces entered the town. Crossing the Yser canal they reached Ypres on October 19th, and were hailed by the populace as the "saviours of Belgium." Shortly after entering the city the civilian population, realising their danger, commenced to leave.
Leaving Ypres the regiment went towards Menin, encountering the Germans at a small village called Amerika. Here it was they received their baptism of shell fire, and were forced to retire to a position on the Zandvoode Ridge, across the Menin road. The 20th Brigade, composed of the Scots Guards, the Grenadiers, the Gordon Highlanders and the Border Regiment, took up a position at Zillebeke on the 21st October, and the first shell was dropped in Ypres on the 23rd. "From that day onwards" (Private Bolton went on) "we were continually subjected to heavy attacks, 'Jack Johnsons' and all sorts of shells flying wholesale - an experience I never wish to go through again. For seventeen days we repelled all attacks, until relieved by the 1st Army Corps from Mons and the Aisne. We had only 340 men left out of the 1,250 who left England. We then went into dug-outs on the Menin road for a rest, until recalled as reinforcements to the 1st Army Corps."
Describing a subsequent charge by the Northumberland Hussars at Klein Zillebeke, Private Bolton said this was the first Territorial force to come into action, and braver lads he never hoped to see. The charge was made under Sir John French's personal direction, aided by the Cavalry of the 1st Division. The following day the Infantry were again driven back, the enemy being so close (1,000 yds.) that "our guns were firing fuse shells bursting at the muzzle." The men were ordered to stand ready for the charge, and it was here that Private Bolton was wounded on the 31st of October. As the hospital train in which he was seated left the station it was hit by a shell, two men being killed outright and 17 more wounded. After a month in hospital at Rouen, he was discharged on the 4th December and went to a Convalescent Camp for a fortnight, rejoining his regiment on Christmas day.
"The Christmas truce was on when I returned, all arms being left in the trenches by mutual consent, and our men fraternized with the Germans on ' dead man's ground' half-way between the trenches, shaking hands and exchanging compliments with them. That lasted until New Year's Day when the Staff-officer came along and ordered three volleys to be fired into the air. At that signal the Germans disappeared into their trenches and we resumed business on the old footing of killing each other at sight."
On February 28th the regiment was relieved by the Canadian Light Infantry and went back for a week's rest preparatory to the big advance at Neuve Chapelle. The bombardment commenced at 3-30, and at 4 o'clock "we caught the Germans retreating and did dreadful execution with the machine guns," the section being personally commanded by General Heyworth. In that engagement 390 German prisoners were taken by the Borderers, including three women, besides a great deal of ammunition and small arms. The machine gun section took a gun which is still in possession of the regiment, and is destined as a trophy for, the officers' mess. Shortly afterwards Private Bolton was laid up in hospital four weeks with fever caused by drinking polluted water. Then came the famous charge at Festubert (May 2), where an advance of 250 yards was made on a 2,000 yds. front. From there they went to Givenchy in the La Basse region, where they experienced a terrible shelling and lost a considerable number of men. Here the Canadians made a splendid advance and got possession of a crater, but were driven out by enfilade fire, all the regiments having to fall back on their original positions. Since then the activities of the opposing forces in that neighbourhood have been practically confined to desultory trench fighting.
The Border Regt. has two V.C.s to its credit, gained at Rouges Bancs on December 18th - one of these (Private Acton) was killed later at Festubert - besides two military crosses and several D.C.M.s. Speaking of Lieut.-Col. Ironside Wood, a commanding officer of great popularity, who was killed at Festubert, the narrator told a characteristic story. In the trenches just before the charge four men were unconcernedly playing cards ('halfpenny brag') when the Colonel came along and remarked:- "Men, you will be gambling on the hob of Hell: do you know what you are doing?"
"Sir," replied the ringleader of the party, "we may be dead in half-an-hour's time, so we are trying to make the best of the opportunity."
"Well spoken, Nightingale. Proceed with the game, lads."
"We lost him directly afterwards," added Private Bolton, "together with Lance-Corporal Crossley, of Kendal, who was one of the party." From a chance remark by the speaker it appears that the pet aversion in the Army, next to the Germans, is "T-----'s Jam," to the demerits of which several other Barnoldswick soldiers have borne testimony.

West Yorkshire Pioneer.

Article Date: 15 October 1915
NEWS FROM BARNOLDSWICK SOLDIERS
Lance-Corporal James Bolton, 2nd Battalion, Border Regiment (machine gun section), who was recently over on furlough, writes from France, to his father, Mr. T. Bolton, Gisburn Street, as follows:-
"Dear old Dad - Here we are again! We have had a ----- of a scrap this last week, but I am still safe and sound. We played ----- with the Germans, but it is a crying shame that they should be able to give themselves up like they do when we get the best of them. They fight to kill until we get to their trenches, and then we must console ourselves by taking men prisoners who a moment before would have made mincemeat of us. We took hundreds, and advanced about 2,000 yards, capturing four field guns (18 pounders), 11 machine guns and a good lot of military stores. I was searching a party of prisoners and an officer captain-gave me a silver fountain pen with a 14 carat gold nib. He could speak English well, and said to me. "Corporal, I am glad I'm a prisoner. The British bombardment has driven us almost mad" He gave me the pen as a souvenir and I am going to send it to Dr. Glen as a token of gratitude. I also got a German helmet badge which I am sending you.
"After we had finished our advance and dug ourselves in, about 5 o'clock the Germans made a counter-attack, a half-hearted affair. They came on preceded by a bombing party of 30 to 40 men. We spotted them, but waited until they got quite close. My gun opened fire, and I don t think one of that party will ever return to the Fatherland. We caught them fairly bobbing, though we were a bit unlucky in losing three good men of my company. I got a bullet through my haversack but happily am no worse. The old regiment covered themselves with glory, and the Brigade General came and told us he was proud of the Cumberland lads. So I think I will now draw to a close, trusting this letter finds you and all at home in the best of health

 

Article Date: 22 October 1915
BARNOLDSWICK - "THE NIGHT BEFORE THE BATTLE"
Writing to a Barnoldswick friend, Lance-Corpl. James Bolton, of the 2nd Border Regiment, relates several interesting incidents in connection with the recent big advance In France:-
"It was on the 23rd we were told to attack. Well, that did it. Me and my pals 'pooled' our cash and went to a nice little cook-shop and started drinking ale, wine (red and white), and had a good bust-up of chips and eggs -pomentaires and oeuffs, they called 'em. We did not intend to leave any cash for Johnny German, if he caught us. On the 24th we moved up to our position ready to attack the following morning At five o'clock the big guns started and at 6-30 off we went over the top. I won't say eager to get at them, not at all, at all; I haven't a bit of sense. But we were anxious to get the job over. Well, they started peppering us like -----
"They had barbed wire defences at least 15 yards wide. It had been cut in places by our shells, and not touched in others; and it was woe betide the men who got in front of the unbroken place - they were cut down like corn. I myself spotted a broken place and made for it as if it had been the Railway Hotel when I was thirsty in Barnoldswick. They shot our men down like rabbits, and when we reached their trenches and got the best of them in fair fight they gave themselves up wholesale. It is jolly hard lines to be cheated of your revenge but such are the laws of war.
"I will tell you a funny little incident. We captured an old quarry which they had used as a fort. In it were about forty Germans and lo! and behold! they had a "Jock " prisoner, one of the Gordons, who had walked right into their hands. We asked him if they had ill-treated him, to which Jock answered, "No! they have been admiring my kilt, that's all." I can tell you, if they had harmed him not one of those Germans could ever have returned to the Fatherland. We took them all prisoners, and one of the officers (who spoke perfect English) expressed his satisfaction after the terrible bombardment they had experienced from our big guns.
"During the attack I saw a touching example of a horse's faithfulness to its master, which I could not have believed possible. The rider got killed by a shell, and the horse, instead of bolting as one would surmise, stood looking at him and neighed as he lay on the ground, and kept walking round him until another shell came and killed the faithful steed also. It learnt me a lesson I shall never forget. I had read of such things in fiction, but I never thought it possible.
"I had a bullet through my haversack, but luckily am no worse. The 20th Brigade again won laurels (and our regiment had done its bit), but I am not the man I used to be. Kind regards to all at old Barlick

 

Article Date: 14 July 1916
BARNOLDSWICK CASUALTIES - KILLED, WOUNDED AND MISSING
Lance-Corporal James Bolton, 2nd Border Regiment (Machine Gun Section) has been admitted to the Southern General Hospital, Edgbaston, Birmingham, suffering from shrapnel wounds in the forehead. He is the eldest son of Mr. Thos. Bolton, 25, Gisburn Street, and has been at the Front since the beginning of the war. He was home on furlough during whit-week.

 

Article Date: 01 September 1916
BARNOLDSWICK - War Trophies
A collection of war relics, kindly lent by Dr. Glen, of Barnoldswick, were on view at a Shakespearian Festival held in the grounds of Bank Hall Military Hospital on Tuesday in aid of the Mayor of Burnley's War Fund. The trophies were brought back by Sapper Kilshaw, Corpl. J. Bolton, and Pte. R.W. Eastwood.

 

Article Date: 30 November 1917
BARNOLDSWICK - ONE WOUNDED, ANOTHER MISSING
Mr. Thos Bolton, 25, Gisburn Street, Barnoldswick, has been notified that his son, Pte. Cephas Bolton, East Lancs. (Machine Gun Section), had been wounded in the arm and is now in hospital in France. His brother, Sergeant James Bolton, Border Regiment, is reported missing since October 23rd. The latter is married, his wife living in Coates House, Coates. He had been twice wounded. Both brothers were in the Regular Army before the war, and have served on the Western Front during the greater part of the hostilities

 

Article Date: 27 September 1918
BARNOLDSWICK'S TOLL OF WAR - Sergeant James Bolton
Mrs. Bolton, 40 Wellington Street, Barnoldswick, has received a War Office notification presuming the death of her husband, Sergeant James Bolton, Border Regiment, who had previously been reported missing on October 26th 1917. Sergeant Bolton, who was 27 years of age, was in the Army three years prior to the present war, in which he had seen a good deal of service. He was in Antwerp during the siege, and twice wounded since. After recuperating he was engaged for several months as drill instructor at various centres in England, and returned to France at Easter 1917. His two brothers are also serving in France, and one in India. They are the sons of Mr. T. Bolton, 25 Gisburn Street, Barnoldswick

West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record Entry:

BOLTON, Sergeant James, aged 27, Border Regt., 40, Wellington Street, [Barnoldswick], reported missing Oct. 26, 1917, now presumed dead.

Article Date: 26 March 1915
BARNOLDSWICK SOLDIER'S ESCAPE: "Have Avenged Dear Old Jack"
Private J. Bolton of the Machine Gun Section, 2nd Border Regiment, 'somewhere in France', writing to a relative in Barnoldswick says:- "Just a few lines to let you know I have avenged dear old Jack." (Reference to Private J. Fawcett, who was a brother-in-law to the writer and whose death in action was reported in the Pioneer a few weeks ago.)
Continuing, the writer says:- "We have had a big battle - my word, it was a scrap. My regiment alone, the old 55th, got 400 prisoners and a machine gun. I got a bullet through my ammunition box, and then through my pants, but it never hurt me! You should have seen their trenches when we got there. Enclosed you will find a photo and postcards. The photo I got off a wounded German who was shot through both legs. I felt sorry for him so I gave him my ration of rum. He said 'Good English' then gave me a photo and pointing out his own portrait from the group, said 'Souvenir, good English!' The other twophotographs I got off a dead German - one was in his pocket and the other (that of a young woman) lay by his side. After the battle the General himself came and personally commended the machine gun section for the way we handled our guns. I will now close, hoping this finds you all in the best of health, as it leaves me at present."

Article Date: 20 August 1915
YPRES "AN INFERNO" - Intrepid Barnoldswick Man's Experiences
An admirable 'bijou' history of the war was given in the interview by Private James Bolton, son of Mr. Thomas Bolton, of Gisburn Street, Barnoldswick, a member of the machine-gun section of the 2nd Battalion Border Regiment, who left for the front on Wednesday morning, after a few days' leave from the firing line, which have been spent in the neighbourhood. Not very tall, but alert, and very obviously keen, Private Bolton is a typical example of his kind, and apart from its historical sequence his story is especially interesting to Barnoldswick residents on account of the varied experiences. Incidentally, he has been twice in hospital since October last.
Along with a number of fellow soldiers, Private Bolton left England on the 4th October last, arriving in Bruges, Belgium, two days later, to be accorded a most enthusiastic reception by the townspeople there. Literally speaking, he said, the British 'Tommies' are simply mobbed by the Belgians, who could do nothing good enough for them, and who insisted on securing their buttons and badges as mementoes of the occasion. After a short stay there, his regiment left for Antwerp, but when within two days' march of that city they met the Belgian Army on the retirement from the evacuation port, and the British soldiers acted as rear-guard, engaging with the advancing German hordes, to cover the retreat of the Belgian Army. Their next resting place was Ostend. But they were soon moved on to Ghent, and it was here that the Border Regiment had its first experience of the actual battle contests with shell fire. It was not very easy for them to cross the Yser Canal to Ypres, where shells and all manner of projectiles were hurled at the defensive British troops by a far larger number of the enemy. The Borderers were kept on at this spot until the 20th when they were joined by regiments of the 20th Brigade. For seventeen days, Private Bolton said, the fighting was like an inferno, and every British soldier had an experience he would never want to go through again. They were eventually relieved by the 1st Army Corps, from Mons and Aisne, but not before 860 of the original 1,200 men of the Border Regiment had been killed or wounded.
Later, the Borderers were sent into the dug-outs for a rest. It was at this time that the Northumberland Hussars, a Territorial regiment, assisted by cavalry of the 1st Division, made their famous charge. The infantry had a pretty hot time, and the big guns were banging away within 1000 yards of each other, firing shells without time fuses, and with disastrous results to both sides.
On the 31st October Private Bolton was shot through the arm, and was sent by train to Rouen - but even as the troop train left the station a shell broke over it, killing three men and wounding seventeen others. He was discharged from hospital on the 4th December, and after a fortnight spent at a convalescent camp, he received orders to rejoin his regiment, and did so, arriving on Christmas Day. He spoke with amusement of the 'mutual truce' that existed at this period, until the break of the New Year, when the British, after firing three volleys in the air, put an end to the extraordinary interlude, and both sides resumed their habitual shooting on sight. Such was the only break in the monotonous routine of trench-life. Of the subsequent floods and rain, and fighting, generally under bad conditions, Private Bolton had more than enough. On February 28th the 'Princess Pats' (Canadians) did their glorious 'bit', and almost immediately afterwards the bloody battle of Neuve Chapelle followed. Here, the machine-gun section, with which Private Bolton worked, were especially commended by the General, and when the battle was over, it was found that the Borderers alone had taken 392 prisoners, of whom three were German women. How they came to be in the trenches Private Bolton did not know.This intrepid Barnoldswick soldier took part in desultory fighting until May 2nd, in the meantime having been in hospital with fever, contracted as the result of drinking polluted water. He was back in the firing line, however, for the great engagement at La Basse, where his section had to retire for a while, owing to enfilade firing by the enemy. There was more touch-and-go fighting, and then came the welcome news of a pass for England "and", added Private Bolton, "I think I earned it."
Private Bolton modestly refused to enlarge upon his personal experiences, but proudly mentioned that the Borderers boasted of two V.C.s, two military decorations, and a number of D.C.M.s. They had been in the thick, and had done their share.
Private Bolton left Barnoldswick for the Front again on Wednesday morning last.

Article Date: 22 October 1915
STORY OF A FAITHFUL CHARGER
Writing to a Barnoldswick friend, Lance Corporal James Bolton of the 2nd Border Regiment relates several interesting incidents in connection with the recent big advance in France:- "It was on the 23rd we were told we were to attack. Well, that we did. Me and my pals 'pooled' our cash and went to a nice little cook-shop and started drinking ale, wine (red and white), and had a good burst up of chips and eggs (pomentaires and ?ffs, they call them). We did not intend to leave any cash for Johnny German, if he caught us. On the 24th we moved up to our position ready to attack the following morning. At 5 o'clock the big guns started, and at 5.30 we were off over the top. I won't say eager to get at them, not at all, I have learnt a bit of sense. But we were anxious to get the job over. Well, they started popping us like -----. They have barbed wire defences at least 15 yards wide. It has been cut in places by our shells, and not touched in others, and it was woe betide the men who got in front of the unbroken places - they were cut down like corn. I myself spotted a broken place and made for it as if it had been the Railway Hotel when I was thirsty in Barnoldswick. They shot our men down like rabbits, and when we reached their trenches and got the best of them in fair fight they gave themselves up wholesale. It is jolly hard lines to be cheated of your revenge, but such are the laws of war. I will tell you of a funny little incident. We captured an old quarry which they used as a fort. In it were about forty Germans, and lo! and behold they had a 'Jock' prisoner, one of the Gordons, who had walked right into their hands. We asked him if they had ill-treated him, to which Jock answered "No! they have been admiring my kilt; that's all". I can tell you, if they had harmed him not one of those Germans would ever have returned to the Fatherland. We took them all prisoners, and one of the officers (who spoke perfect English) expressed his satisfaction after the terrible bombardment they had experienced from our big guns. During the attack I saw a touching example of a horse's faithfulness to its master, which I could not have believed possible. The rider got killed by a shell, and the horse, instead of bolting as one would surmise, stood looking at him and neighed as he lay on the ground, and kept walking round him until another shell came and killed the faithful steed also. It taught me a lesson I shall never forget. I had read of such things in fiction, but I never thought it possible. I had a bullet through my haversack, but luckily I am no worse. The 20th Brigade again won laurels (and my own regiment has done its bit) but I am not quite the man I used to be. My nerves are almost gone with continually hammering away. Kind regards to all at old Barnoldswick."

Article Date: 14 July 1916
BARNOLDSWICK CASUALTIES
Lance-Corporal James Bolton, 2nd Border Regiment (Machine Gun Section) has been admitted to the Southern General Hospital, Edgbaston, Birmingham, suffering from shrapnel wounds in the forehead. He is the eldest son of Mr. Thos. Bolton, 25, Gisburn Street, and has been at the Front since the beginning of the war. He was home on furlough during Whit-week.

Article Date: 30 November 1917
BARNOLDSWICK
ONE WOUNDED, ANOTHER MISSING
Mr. Thos. Bolton, 15, Gisburn Street, Barnoldswick, has been notified that his son, Pte. Cephas Bolton, East Lancashire Regiment (Machine Gun Section), has been wounded in the arm and is now in hospital in France. His brother, Sergt. James Bolton, Border Regiment, is reported missing since October 23rd. The latter is married, his wife living at Coates House, Coates. He had been twice wounded. Both brothers were in the regular army before the war, and have served on the Western front during the greater part of the hostilities.

Article Date: 27 September 1918
Barnoldswick Sergeant "Presumed" Dead
Mrs. Bolton, 40, Wellington Street, Barnoldswick, has received a War Office notification presuming the death of her husband, Sergt. James Bolton, Border Regiment, who had previously been reported missing on Oct. 20th, 1917. Sergt. Bolton, who was 27 years of age, was in the army three years prior to the present war, in which he had seen a good deal of service. He was in Antwerp during the siege and twice wounded since. After recuperating he was engaged for several months as drill instructor at various centres in England, and returned to France at Easter, 1917. His two brothers are also serving, one in France and one in India. They are the sons of Mr. T. Bolton, 25, Gisburn Street, Barnoldswick.



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panbiker
Senior Member


2301 Posts
Posted - 05/11/2011 : 11:12
Very interesting Peter, a proper insight into one mans experiences in the trenches, no doubt sanitised to a great degree in how he relates it to home, you are certainly turning up some good detail here.

James Bolton here is not the J. Bolton I referred to earlier. The grave is marked with a John Bolton who is the one I have marked as a possible and is interred in the churchyard in a family plot. I'll point him out tomorrow.


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Chris CPGW
New Member


41 Posts
Posted - 05/11/2011 : 11:42
Ian is there a chance you can photograph Wilfred's plot with a marker in situ ?
Regards
Chris


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panbiker
Senior Member


2301 Posts
Posted - 05/11/2011 : 12:22
No problem Chris, Rob who I spoke with at the council said he would go down to the cemetery and mark the plot H37 on the grass. He said it was adjacent to a fairly prominent memorial which I can also bring to mind. I will have a look tomorrow.

I have never been able to work out the logic of the row/plot system used at Ghyll. It seems to be very haphazard and appears to work in  some parts but not in other areas. The main sections are ok but down to plot level is a bit confusing to say the least. The council records are based on the OS and they record a full grid reference for each location.


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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 05/11/2011 : 12:34
I keep coming across items that give a new meaning to the term "A terrible waste of life" the latest tells of a Barlick Mum found floating in the canal by Bankfield a week after receiving news of her Sons death. Already we have a suicide of a wounded soldier, another killed by an ambulance whilst trying to aid a fallen comrade, another knocked down and killed by a London bus, a Man who's heart gave out and a young lad who having lied about his age was reclaimed by his parents, then conscripted and killed, and then there are the many who died of disease. When I have finished this I will be able to see just how many Barlick Men shared this fate. I am going to have my midday "Tot" now and drink to all of them.


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Chris CPGW
New Member


41 Posts
Posted - 05/11/2011 : 12:49
Many thanks Ian. I'll contact In From The Cold   after your meet up at Ghyll and take it from there.

Regards
Chris

Edited by - Chris CPGW on 05/11/2011 12:51:51 PM


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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 05/11/2011 : 15:31
Surname: BOLTON

Forename(s): William Henry

Place of Birth: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Residence: Ramsbottom, Lancashire

Service No: 2501

Rank: Private

Regiment/Corps/Service: Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment)

Battalion/Unit: 1/6th Battalion

Division: 49th (West Riding) Division

Age: 23

Date of Death: 1915-07-30

Awards: -----

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: Plot 1. Row H. Grave 4.

CWGC Cemetery: FERME-OLIVIER CEMETERY

CWGC Memorial: -----

Non-CWGC Burial: -----

Comments:

1901 Barnoldswick Census: William H. Bolton, aged 8 years, born Barnoldswick, Yorkshire, son of Robert and Alice Bolton.

For additional information see: 'The Ingleton War Memorial, 1914-18, 1939-45' by Andrew Brooks (2005).
 

Craven's Part in the Great War Entry:

PRIVATE WILLIAM HENRY BOLTON, Duke of Well.'s Regt., son of Mrs. Bolton, 58, Esp Lane, Barnoldswick, died of wounds 30th July, 1915. Aged 23 years.

 

West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record Entry:

BOLTON, Wm. Henry, 6th West Riding Regiment, son of Mrs. Bolton, 58, Esp Lane, [Barnoldswick], died from wounds on July 30, 1915.
Article Date: 13 August 1915

BARNOLDSWICK SOLDIER'S LEG SHATTERED
It is unofficially reported that a Barnoldswick soldier named Pte. William Henry Bolton, of the 1st 6th Duke of Wellington's Regiment, has had his leg shattered by a shell in the trenches. The information first came through from Pte. William Bowker, another Barnoldswick lad in the same regiment, and it was practically confirmed by Sergt. P. H. Garratt, of the Stretcher-bearer Company attached to the regiment, who was home on leave last week. Sergt. Garratt stated that he was at the dressing station, about half an hour after Bolton was brought in, and learnt that he was in a critical condition from shock and loss of blood and that but faint hopes were entertained of his recovery. Pte. Bolton is 23 years of age and was well-know as an amateur boxer. Strange to say his mother, who resides at 58, Esp Lane, had not up to the time of writing received any official intimation of the sad occurrence which reported to have taken place a fortnight ago.

Article Date: 13 August 1915
PRIVATE BOLTON OF BARNOLDSWICK SERIOUSLY WOUNDED
An unofficial intimation has been received from the Front to the effect that Private William Henry Bolton, of the 1st 6th West Riding Regiment, has been seriously wounded in France. The information was contained on a post-card from Private William Bowker, of the same regiment. Both men are Barnoldswick residents, and the news in regard to Private Bolton is alleged to have been confirmed by a statement made by Sergt. P.H. Garratt, of the stretcher-bearer party, who - Mrs. Bolton, the wounded soldier's mother, says - informed her that as he was on the point of leaving the Front on seven days' leave saw her son being brought into the dressing station.
No official or definite news has arrived, though it is believed that Private Bolton has had his leg blown away, is suffering terribly from loss of blood, and is lying at one of the Base hospitals in France. The War Office has as yet made no communication.
Private Bowker was formerly a twister at the Butts Mill, and was well-known locally as an amateur boxer and all-round athlete of some proficiency. His mother lives at No. 58 Esp Lane, Barnoldswick

Article Date: 27 August 1915
'BASHER' BOLTON'S DEATH CONFIRMED
Mrs. Bolton, 58, Esp Lane, Barnoldswick, has received confirmation of the death of her son Pte. Wm. Henry Bolton, of the 1st 6th West Riding Regiment, in a letter from one of his comrades at the front. It will be remembered that Pte. Bolton (whose portrait appeared in our columns at the time) had his leg shattered by a shell in the trenches, and it was rumoured that he had succumbed to his injuries. Bolton was well-known locally as an amateur boxer, hence the sobriquet 'Basher.' He went to France on the 14th April. The letter is as follows:-
Friday, August 30th
"Dear Mrs. Bolton. - I received the letter addressed to Willie last night and am very sorry to inform you that he died of wounds three weeks ago to-day (Friday 30 July).
"The Germans were shelling us very heavily that morning. One shell dropped close to Willie, shattering his leg. He passed away two hours after they got him to the hospital. All in human power was done to save him, but it was of no use. I enquired where he was buried and as soon as we get back for a rest I shall visit his grave at the first opportunity. I, and all who were acquainted with him, offer you our deepest sympathy in your sad bereavement.
"We miss him now and often talk about him. I am indeed very sorry for you, but you have one consolation, that he willingly gave his life for King and Country.
"I remain, yours with deepest sympathy, E. Kennedy, 'C' Company."


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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 05/11/2011 : 15:33
Surname: BOOCOCK

Forename(s): William

Place of Birth: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Residence: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Service No: 12979

Rank: Private

Regiment/Corps/Service: Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment)

Battalion/Unit: 9th (Service) Battalion

Division: 17th (Northern) Division

Age: 22

Date of Death: 1916-07-07

Awards: -----

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: Pier and Face 6 A and 6 B.

CWGC Cemetery: -----

CWGC Memorial: THIEPVAL MEMORIAL

Non-CWGC Burial: -----

Comments:

Craven's Part in the Great War Entry:

PRIVATE WILLIAM BOOCOCK, Duke of Well.'s Regt., of 15, Montrose Terrace, Barnoldswick, officially presumed killed 7th July, 1916. Aged 22 years

 

West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record Entry:

BOOCOCK, W., aged 22 years, West Riding Regiment, 15, Montrose Terrace, [Barnoldswick], killed in action, July 7, 1916.

Article Date: 28 July 1916
BARNOLDSWICK CASUALTY LIST - THE LATE COMPANY-SERGEANT-MAJOR GREEN
The following letter (received too late for publication last week) from a Barnoldswick comrade in the 9th Battalion Duke of Wellington's Regiment, tells how Company-Sergt.-Major Fred Green, who was awarded the D.C.M. last March met his death. The writer is Lance-Corpl. Frank Edmondson:-

"I have just had time to write. I have once more come out of the battle without a scratch. I dare say you will have read all about the great offensive in which we were engaged. I have been very lucky. Sam Woodhead was wounded next to me and three killed. Fred Green was wounded; he got killed by a shell while bringing him (Woodhead) down to the dressing station. W. Dacre and W. Boocock were also wounded, and a lad named Leach (all from Barnoldswick) was killed."
Happily the information in regard to Leach turned out incorrect, for though Sergt. Wm. Leach was officially reported killed, his wife, who resides at 7 Stewart Street, had received a letter from him a day or two previously saying he was at a casualty clearing station, having been struck on the head by a piece of shrapnel "Luckily it did not penetrate the bone. I am going on splendidly, and very soon hope to see you in England."
Sergt. Leach joined the army soon after the outbreak of hostilities. He was a playing member of the Barnoldswick Football Club

Article Date: 04 August 1916

BARNOLDSWICK MEN MISSING
Pte. Wm. Boocock, 9th Duke of Wellington's, whose wife resides at Montrose Terrace, Barnoldswick, has been officially reported missing since July 1st.
Pte. Thos. Frederick Theodore, 2nd Duke of Wellington's, eldest son of Mr. F. Theodore, 1, Manchester Road, has been missing since the same date. He went out last September

Article Date: 16 February 1917
BOOCOCK - Missing since July 7th, 1916, and death presumed on that date in France, Pte. William Boocock, West Riding Regiment, husband of Mrs. Boocock, 15, Montrose Terrace, Barnoldswick, aged 22 years

Article Date: 16 February 1917
MISSING SINCE JULY - BARNOLDSWICK SOLDIER'S DEATH PRESUMED: PRIVATE WILLIAM BOOCOCK
The Army Council have now notified Mrs. W. Boocock, 15, Montrose Terrace, Barnoldswick, that her husband, Pte. William Boocock, West Riding Regiment, was killed in action on the 7th July last, when he was posted as missing. Enquiries amongst his comrades in the same company, however, fix the date four days earlier during the enemy bombardment at Contalmaison, when a shell burst close to Pte. Boocock and he was never seen again. He was 22 years of age, and son of Mr. Moses Boocock, Rainhall, Barnoldswick. He enlisted in August 1914, and had been at the Front 13 months at the time of his death. He was formerly employed at Messrs. Dewhursts Ltd., Long Ing Shed, as a twister and loomer

9th (Service) Bn. Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment)

At Bois des Tailles (1/7) awaiting orders to move forward. To Morlancourt (2/7), trenches around Fricourt (3/7). In action during operations at Contalmaison (4/7)-(7/7). Relieved and to Méaulte.
[William Boocock was killed in action on the 7th July 1916.]


thomo Go to Top of Page
thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 05/11/2011 : 15:34
Surname: BOWKER

Forename(s): Edward

Place of Birth: Rochdale, Lancashire

Residence: -----

Service No: 267270

Rank: Private

Regiment/Corps/Service: Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment)

Battalion/Unit: 2/6th Battalion

Division: 62nd (2/West Riding) Division

Age: --

Date of Death: 1917-11-27

Awards: -----

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: Panel 6 and 7.

CWGC Cemetery: -----

CWGC Memorial: CAMBRAI MEMORIAL, LOUVERVAL

Non-CWGC Burial: -----

Comments:

-----

 

 

Craven's Part in the Great War Entry:

PRIVATE EDWARD BOWKER, Duke of Well.'s Regt., of 35, Denton Street, Barnoldswick, officially presumed dead 27th November, 1917.

 

West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record Entry:

BOWKER, Edward, aged 21 years, West Riding Regiment, brother of Mr. John Bowker, 35, Denton Street, [Barnoldswick], killed in action Nov. 26, 1917.

Article Date: 14 May 1915
ANOTHER WOUNDED BARNOLDSWICK SOLDIER
Mrs. A. Bowker of 13, Hill Street, Barnoldswick, has received a letter from the Front this week in which a comrade of her husband, who has been wounded in the firing line, conveys the news of how the incident took place. The write is Lieutenant R.C. Barrett of the Duke of Wellington's, and he says:- "Dear Mrs. Bowker, It has fallen to my lot to be the bearer to you of sad news. Your dear husband, whilst on duty in the trenches, was unfortunately hit by a rifle bullet which penetrated from his left cheek through his right cheek. We rendered aid quickly and he is doing well and has been taken straight to hospital. The doctor says he expects him to be with you in England in a fortnight. His brother, Billy (also at the Front) is very cut up, but I have done my best to calm him."
The wounded man is a son of Mrs. Ellen Anne Bowker, of 10 East Hill Street, Barnoldswick, and with his brother William has been at the Front for some time.

Article Date: 28 June 1918
Private E. Bowker, Barnoldswick
Private Edward Bowker, West Riding Regiment, reported missing November 27th, 1917, is now presumed to have been killed on that date or since. He was 39 years of age, single, and lived with his brother, Mr. John Bowker, at 35, Denton Street, Barnoldswick. He had been in France about 10 months. Prior to enlisting he was employed at Thornton Quarries


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