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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted -  14/10/2004  :  09:57
Jack is making a lot of friends in Barlick. I don't know why, maybe it's his face markings but people on the street feel the need to stroke him. Women in particular fall for him.

As you know, I had a bad experience with Joe, the lurcher from Irlam. I was very wary about taking another feral dog on but I'm beginning to think that Jack will make it as a member of the team. He's good at coming to hand when off the lead but I'm not saying he'd take any notice if he was distracted.

He's fast and very agile and seems to have lungs as big as a bucket, I haven't heard him pant as though he's out of breath even after a hard run. As for jumping, he's like a cat. Here he is on his favourite perch. Someone asked me the other day why I don't stop him doing it. It's easier to clean the drainer twice a day!


[This topic started as Jack's blog but in Jan 2008 I had to put him down because he started attacking strange dogs.  His successor is Black Jack. a Patterdale pup, no point erasing Jack the Lurcher from history....  he was a good dog and what happened wasn't his fault.  He had too bad a start.....]


Stanley Challenger Graham




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stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk
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Bradders
Senior Member


1880 Posts
Posted - 03/04/2011 : 00:12
P.S. He must have found a supply of fresh water (rain / snowfall  into pockets on the roof ....? , or a tank in the eaves - unlikely ) and must have been pretty well fed  before the event......He was moving about completely normally and seemed to know where to "hide"  from the rescue team.

I've watched this video quite a few times......and  that dog  was definitely "at home" on the raft ......

Good  lad / lass ...eh !


BRADDERS BLUESINGER Go to Top of Page
Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 03/04/2011 : 05:13
Great video and what a good thing that they took the trouble. You're right, a good dog, I'll bet he soon gets a good home. They should call him Harvey......


Stanley Challenger Graham




Barlick View
stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
moh
Silver Surfer


6860 Posts
Posted - 30/05/2011 : 11:30
We have a visitor for the week - our granddaughter's Jackadoodle (cross between a poodle and a Jack Russell) - he is a cute little thing but it does not tempt me to get another dog.  It was 3 years on May 26th since Sam died and I still miss him dearly.


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Gloria
Senior Member


3581 Posts
Posted - 30/05/2011 : 15:57
Take the plunge Moh-----you will be glad you did.


I'd be dangerous with a brain!!!!!
www.briercliffesociety.co.uk Go to Top of Page
Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 31/05/2011 : 06:00
I think one of the cutest dogs I ever saw was a cross between a Jack and a Chichuaha.


Stanley Challenger Graham




Barlick View
stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
Another
Traycle Mine Overseer


6250 Posts
Posted - 31/05/2011 : 07:39
Lovely sight yesterday morning.

I had Misty on Bullholme and was talking to a young guy who had a staffie cross that was 17 years old and very bad arthritis. It was very alert with its tail high and wagging and was lumbering towards Misty for a sniff. She doesn't often tolerate male attention but she was quite happy to have his.

After a while a lady came towards the car park with a big, fawn, smooth haired lurcher on a lead. The dog was pulling like hell to get to Misty and her friend so after asking me and the young man if we objected she let the dog off the lead. 

Misty and the other lurcher had a quick sniff then set off on a chase. The young man could not believe his eyes at how fast they went on a full circle of Bullhome - each taking the lead in turn from the other. Poor old staffie wanted to join in and made the effort but by the time he'd thought about what to do the others were back. He ambled up to the two panting dogs who both fussed over him for a bit  but then  started again to play tag with each other and in a moment were off this time anti-clockwise round the rec again.

Staffie's owner said how pleased he was that his dog had shown such interest and attempts to join in with the others. He's been contemplating a visit to the vets thinking that the dogs quality of life was now at a very low ebb. Having seen how he was with the two lurchers he'd changed his mind and said he would put all thoughts of the vets out of the way.

What a great start to the day. Nolic 


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 01/06/2011 : 05:36
Nice story Comrade. Jack's attitude to old dogs is completely different than his normal mode. It looks suspiciously like respect but of course we have to be carful attributing human characteristics to dogs. One old lurcher he met frequently only came alive when she saw Jack, she didn't bother about any other dogs. He'd chase with her but noticeably turned the wick down to allow her to catch him. We could learn a lot from dogs.


Stanley Challenger Graham




Barlick View
stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 23/06/2011 : 08:05
As many of you will know from the computer forums one of the delights of the FMII is its silent running, you have to get very close to it to hear the fan.

However, this doesn't apply to Jack! We have very good routines and he is perfectly in synch with them. After my morning's work on my writing I switch the computer off and we go up Letcliffe for a walk. The thing is that Jack understands all this and usually has a good sleep in the rocking chair while I do me literary slaving.  So, at 10:45 I tidy up and shut the system down. Despite the silent running, Jack immediately gets off the chair and is ready for me before I've even put me distance glasses on. He is so aware of what is happening and recognises the triggers. Another trigger is if I rise from me chair andchange glasses, he knows that this always precedes something interesting. One corollary of this is that any interruption of his routine has definite effects on him and you have to be ready for them.

Dog watching is fascinating and very rewarding because once you've identified the triggers you can use them for control. I've always held that this route to understanding is more productive than the formal 'training classes' that people spend money on. 


Stanley Challenger Graham




Barlick View
stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
Bradders
Senior Member


1880 Posts
Posted - 23/06/2011 : 18:22
Yes , that's all very well, but ........I'm convinced that Dexter knows what I'm going to do before  I do.......!


BRADDERS BLUESINGER Go to Top of Page
Tizer
VIP Member


5150 Posts
Posted - 23/06/2011 : 19:50
You've got a dog called Dexter, Bradders? Time you got a second one and called it Sinister. But you'd have to train them to walk on the correct side of you.


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Bradders
Senior Member


1880 Posts
Posted - 23/06/2011 : 20:11
Nope ......Peter , if they were both Patterdales , I'd be MADE to walk in the middle !

( the next dog I get will definitely be called Sinister )

I met some clowns once , called Potso & Palfi....I named my Cocker Spaniel(of Ware) ,  "Potso" .  If I'd had another it would have been "Palfi"..I like the idea of linked names .

Just reminds me ....some friends in Bracknell  called Toomey , had a dog called Socket ! 


BRADDERS BLUESINGER Go to Top of Page
Gloria
Senior Member


3581 Posts
Posted - 23/06/2011 : 20:55
Brilliant Bradders lolollolol


I'd be dangerous with a brain!!!!!
www.briercliffesociety.co.uk Go to Top of Page
Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 24/06/2011 : 06:35
I once knew a woman who had a parrot called Onan because it spilled its seed.

Brad, they read our body language, that's how they appear to know what we are going to do before it happens. Fascinating subject.  When Mary and I got two Jack Russels we called them Eigg and Muck.


Stanley Challenger Graham




Barlick View
stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
Bradders
Senior Member


1880 Posts
Posted - 25/06/2011 : 01:24
Stanley , I shall never cross the Tamar again , without a feeling (stoppit !) of sympathy for that Parrot .......

Actually , I gather it's (tis) traditional to honk one's horn when re-entering Cornwall....I always do it  when I've been to England, and I'm not Cornish, but it is like coming home , somehow .


BRADDERS BLUESINGER Go to Top of Page
Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 25/06/2011 : 07:11
Well it is almost an island. (God slipped up there I think.)


Stanley Challenger Graham




Barlick View
stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
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