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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted -  11/10/2011  :  15:24
Khaki in colour and sombre in content. "Cravens Part in the Great War", there will not have been many households in Barlick and what was then a much larger Craven Area, that did not have at least one copy of this book. In my immediate Family there would have been at least four and I still have two of them, albeit that one is with my son on Anglesey. Over the years I have seen them at jumble sales, in second hand shops and in piles of rubbish for disposal, even left behind when a house has been vacated. They will have turned up all over the place, I have come across them in Wales, the Isle of Wight and Hampshire, the two that I have belonged to my Father and Maternal Grandfather.
Many years ago I went through one of them from cover to cover noting those from Barlick who had given their lives in the service of King and Country, my notes are long gone so I am going to do it again, a few pages at a time, but this time I will include other local places within an approximate seven mile radius, Gisburn, Foulridge, Earby and so on. I will post my findings on here with the name, address and a precis of other details, as some are quite extensive, each name is to have the page number for my reference so that if anyone wants further information, I can soon find it. In a good number of cases there is a photograph, these I will copy and post in groups of ten at suitable intervals. In the book there are 391 pages so I will use a few abreviations hopefully all self explanatory, ie, KIA:- Killed in Action. MPD:- Missing presumed Dead. DOW:- Died as a result of Wounds, and one that is all too frequent, DFD:- Died from Disease or Illness.
One Man was responsible for the existance of these books and that was Mr, Walter Morrison Esq, JP of Malham Tarn who put forward the idea of the book and defrayed the entire cost.
There is quite a bit about the war itself up to page 50, including the Rohilla Tradgedy, then comes the dreadful list of those who did not come home, and so it is that on page 57 we find the first of Barlicks Sons, and is as follows:-

2nd Lieut Harry Thornton Pickles, 3rd Bn Duke of Wellington's (West Riding) Regiment (SR) second son of Mr Stephen Pickles JP, CC, Of Raysgill Barnoldswick KIA 26th April 1916 aged 26. P57.

In these first ten pages the extent of family loss is made very clear for it was in the Village of Carleton nr Skipton that this comes up:-

P53,  Lieut. Anthony E.K. Slingsby, 1/6th Duke of Wellington's (WR) Regiment, Son of Mr and Mrs J A Slingsby Carla Beck Carleton. KIA France 14th July 1915. Aged 26.
P57,  Captain Arthur Morris Slingsby, MC 56th Punjabi Rifles,  2nd son of Mr and Mrs J A Slingsby KIA 8th March 1916 in Mesopotamia. Aged 30.
P58.  Lieut. Stephen Slingsby of HMS Defence, 4th son of Mr and Mrs J A Slingsby. KIA in North Sea June 1916. Aged 24.
This out of a total of five sons all serving.
 
Lothersdale is the next local Village with on P62.  Lieut Alec Wilson, 1st Herefordshire Regiment, Son of Mr and Mrs F J Wilson JP of Lothersdale. KIA 26th March 1917 in Egypt.
P54, Lieut. The Hon, C. A. Lister Royal Marines, Hood Battalion, Only surviving son and heir of Lord Ribblesdale of Gisburne Park DOW 28th August 1915. Elder Brother killed in 1904 in Somaliland.
Greystones, Gisburn.  Lieut. George Proctor, Lancs Fusiliers, only son of Mr and Mrs Thomas Proctor. KIA 7th April 1918 aged 24. P70.
Marton is on P73, Which Marton is not clear,  2nd Lieut, Joseph Bryan Bushby South Staffs Regiment, son of Mr and Mrs Joseph Bushby, Schoolhouse Farm Marton, DOW, 4th October 1918 aged 26.



Ed

Edited by - thomo on 11/10/2011 4:05:43 PM


thomo
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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 22/11/2011 : 09:22
Surname: HARTLEY

Forename(s): Lewis

Place of Birth: Haworth, Yorkshire

Residence: -----

Service No: 267988

Rank: Private

Regiment/Corps/Service: Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment)

Battalion/Unit: 2nd Battalion

Division: 4th Division

Age: 21

Date of Death: 1918-08-31

Awards: -----

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: I. A. 16.

CWGC Cemetery: VIS-EN-ARTOIS BRITISH CEMETERY, HAUCOURT

CWGC Memorial: -----

Non-CWGC Burial: -----

Craven's Part in the Great War Entry:

PRIVATE LEWIS HARTLEY, Duke of Well.'s Regt., son of Mr. & Mrs. P. Hartley, 237, Gisburn Road, Barnoldswick, killed in action 31st August, 1918. Aged 21 years.

West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record Entry:

HARTLEY, Lewis, aged 31, West Riding Regiment, 237, Gisburn Road, [Barnoldswick], killed in action Aug. 31, 1918.

Article Date: 27 September 1918
BARNOLDSWICK'S TOLL OF WAR - Private Lewis Hartley
Private Lewis Hartley, West Riding Regiment, officially reported killed in action on August 31st, was 21 years of age and the youngest of three soldier sons of Mr. and Mrs. Pickles Hartley, 237 Gisburn Road, Barnoldswick (formerly of Haworth). He had been at the Front two years and had been previously wounded. Prior to joining the Forces, he worked for Messrs. R. Brooks and Sons, Westfield Shed

.Article Date: 29 August 1919
HARTLEY - In loving memory of Private Lewis Hartley, Duke of Wellington's Regiment, killed in action September 2nd, 1918.
His memory is as dear to-day

As in the hour he passed away.
From Mother, Father, and Family, 237, Gisburn Road, Barnoldswick


thomo Go to Top of Page
thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 22/11/2011 : 09:23
Surname: HAWORTH

Forename(s): Gilbert

Place of Birth: Blackburn, Lancashire

Residence: -----

Service No: 202894

Rank: Private

Regiment/Corps/Service: Lancashire Fusiliers

Battalion/Unit: 1/5th Battalion

Division: 42nd (East Lancashire) Division

Age: 25

Date of Death: 1917-10-15

Awards: -----

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: IV. G. 11.

CWGC Cemetery: COXYDE MILITARY CEMETERY

CWGC Memorial: -----

Non-CWGC Burial: -----

Comments:

Gilbert Haworth served as John Mather, 202894.

1901 Blackburn Census: 107, Hancock Street - Gilbert Haworth, aged 8 years, born Blackburn, son of John and Frances E. Haworth.

1911 Bury Census: Wellington Barracks, 3rd Bn. Lancashire Fusiliers - Pte Gilbert Haworth, aged 18 years, born Blackburn.

The British Army Service Record for Gilbert Haworth exists but may be incomplete. [Gilbert Haworth deserted from the Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment on the 20 July 1915.)

British Army WW1 Medal Rolls Index Cards: Pte John Mather, 202894, Lancashire Fusiliers.

Brother of Harry Haworth (266206).

Craven's Part in the Great War Entry:

PRIVATE GILBERT HAWORTH, Lancs. Fusiliers, son of Mr. & Mrs. John Haworth, 19, Clifford Street, Barnoldswick, killed in action 13th October, 1917. Aged 25 years.

 

West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record Entry:

HOWARTH, Gilbert, aged 25 years, Lancashire Fusiliers, son of Mr. and Mrs. John Howarth, 19, Clifford Street, [Barnoldswick], killed in action Oct. 15, 1917.

Article Date: 02 November 1917
HAWORTH - October 15th 1917, killed on the Western Front, Private Gilbert Haworth, Lancashire Fusiliers, son of Mr. and Mrs. John Haworth, 19, Clifford Street, Barnoldswick, aged 25 years.

Article Date: 02 November 1917
PRIVATE G. HAWORTH KILLED IN ACTION
Pte. Gilbert Haworth, Lancashire Fusiliers, who is officially reported killed in France on October 15th, was the son of Mr. and Mrs. John Haworth, 19, Clifford Street, Barnoldswick. He was 25 years of age and before joining the army in August, 1914, was a weaver at Messrs. Widdup and Sons, Barnsey Shed. He had spent twelve months in Egypt prior to going to France in February last, and was home on leave in August. "He was on duty in the front line (writes Capt. Peacock to the bereaved parents) on the morning of October 15th, when at 'stand to' he was shot by a sniper. You will be glad to hear that he suffered no pain, and that death was instantaneous. It was a great shock to us, as this was the first casualty we had in that part of the line, and we all, both officers and men, sympathise with you very much indeed. He was a good soldier and will be a great loss to the company."


thomo Go to Top of Page
thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 22/11/2011 : 09:24
Surname: HAWORTH

Forename(s): Harry

Place of Birth: Blackburn, Lancashire

Residence: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Service No: 266206

Rank: L/Corporal

Regiment/Corps/Service: Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment)

Battalion/Unit: 2/7th Battalion

Division: 62nd (2/West Riding) Division

Age: 30

Date of Death: 1918-04-09

Awards: -----

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: IX. B. 2.

CWGC Cemetery: BIENVILLERS MILITARY CEMETERY

CWGC Memorial: -----

Non-CWGC Burial: -----

Comments:

1901 Blackburn Census: 107, Hancock Street - Harry Haworth, aged 13 years, born Blackburn, son of John and Frances E. Haworth.

1911 Barnoldswick Census: 14, Fountain Street - Harry Haworth, aged 23 years, born Blackburn, son of John and Frances Ellen Haworth.

Brother of Gilbert Haworth (202894).

Craven's Part in the Great War Entry:

LANCE-CORPORAL HARRY HAWORTH, Duke of Well.'s Regt., son of Mr. & Mrs. John Haworth, 15, Clifford Street, Barnoldswick, killed in action 9th April, 1918. Aged 30 years.

West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record Entry:

HOWARTH, Lance Corporal Harry, aged 30 years, West Riding Regiment, 15, Clifford Street, [Barnoldswick], killed in action April 9, 1918

Article Date: 10 May 1918
CRAVEN AND THE WAR
Lance-Corpl. H. Haworth, Barnoldswick
Lance-Corporal Harry Haworth, West Riding Regiment, killed in action on April 9th, was 30 years of age and the second son of Mr. and Mrs. John Haworth, 15, Clifford Street, Barnoldswick, to pay the price. He leaves a wife and one child. Lance-Corporal Haworth joined up in November, 1914, and had spent 15 months in France, whither he returned from leave only a fortnight before his death. He worked for Walter Dewhurst Limited, Long Ing Shed. Another brother is in hospital in France.

Article Date: 10 May 1918
HAWORTH - Killed in action April 9th, Lance-Corpl. Harry Haworth, West Riding Regiment, son of Mr. And Mrs. John Haworth, 15, Clifford Street, Barnoldswick, aged 30.


thomo Go to Top of Page
thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 22/11/2011 : 09:26
Surname: HAWORTH

Forename(s): Herbert

Place of Birth: Blackburn, Lancashire

Residence: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Service No: 266636

Rank: Private

Regiment/Corps/Service: Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment)

Battalion/Unit: 2/6th Battalion

Division: 62nd (2/West Riding) Division

Age: 26

Date of Death: 1917-05-20

Awards: -----

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: C.35

CWGC Cemetery: ST LEGER BRITISH CEMETERY

CWGC Memorial: -----

Non-CWGC Burial: -----

Craven's Part in the Great War Entry:

PRIVATE HERBERT HAWORTH, Duke of Well.'s Regt., of 84, Manchester Road, Barnoldswick, died of wounds 20th May, 1917. Aged 25 years.

West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record Entry:

HAWORTH, H., aged 25 years, Duke of Wellington's Regt., formerly of 84, Manchester Road, [Barnoldswick], died of wounds May 20, 1917.

Article Date: 08 June 1917
HAWORTH - May 20th 1917, from wounds received in action in France, Pte. H. Haworth, Duke of Wellington's Regiment, formerly of 84, Manchester Road, Barnoldswick, aged 25 years.

Article Date: 08 June 1917
"HIS COMRADES THOUGHT THE WORLD OF HIM" - Officer's Tribute to Barnoldswick Private
The spirit of true comradeship existing between officers and men at the Front has seldom been better illustrated than in the following letter, received this week by Mrs. Haworth, 84, Manchester Road, Barnoldswick, in relation to the death from shrapnel wounds of her husband, Pte. Herbert Haworth, Duke of Wellington's Regiment:-
B.E.F., May 26th.
"Dear Madam, - It is with sincere regret I have to inform you of the death of your husband, Pte. H. Haworth, as a result of a head wound received on May 20th. I was only one yard from him when it happened. We were holding a post together and had been subjected to heavy shelling all day, but no one was hurt until 2 p.m., when a shrapnel shell burst directly over our post. One man was wounded in the arm and your husband, who unfortunately was moving about at the time, was hit when a piece of shrapnel struck his steel helmet with such force as to penetrate his skull. I did all I could for him in the way of dressing his wound, and sent immediately for the stretcher-bearers, who pluckily came under shellfire and carried him down to the dressing station, but unfortunately the doctor gave no hope for him. He attended to him, however, and then sent him to a more comfortable hospital where he passed away peacefully at 5 o'clock the same day (Sunday) without regaining consciousness. I went on Thursday to see your husband's grave, and if I have the same luck I only hope I may be put in as peaceful a resting place. He is buried just outside the village of St. Leger in a well-kept grave in a row with other fallen heroes of all ranks up to Colonel. Your husband had been in my platoon ever since I joined this battalion out here in February, and a more cheerful, willing soldier I can never have the honour of serving with. All his comrades thought the world of him, and we all extend to you our deepest sympathy in your time of sorrow. That very morning he seemed unusually cheerful, and we had a long chat together, during which he showed me your photograph and also your two children's. He was proud of you all, and could never have shown a more loving disposition had he lived ever so long. I am very sad at having to part with another of my best boys. I pray most earnestly that the Great Consoler may be with you, and that you may feel His hand by you to strengthen and to help.
"Very Sincerely Yours, ARTHUR F. MELTON, 2nd Lt."
Pte. Haworth, who was 25 years of age, went out to France in February last. A native of Blackburn, he had lived in Barnoldswick about seven years, and prior to enlisting was employed as a weaver at Messrs. Slater Bros., Wellhouse Mill.

Article Date: 24 May 1918
HAWORTH - In loving memory of Private Herbert Haworth, who died of wounds in France May 20th, 1917.
If those who caused this awful war

Were the only ones to fight,

A brighter world this would have been

For aching hearts to-night.

Not gone from memory or from love,

But to our Father's home above.
- From his sorrowing Wife and Children, 3, Turner Street, Barnoldswick


thomo Go to Top of Page
Callunna
Revolving Grey Blob


3044 Posts
Posted - 22/11/2011 : 11:49


quote:
If those who caused this awful war

Were the only ones to fight,

A brighter world this would have been

For aching hearts to-night.



I think that sums it up perfectly.Go to Top of Page
thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 23/11/2011 : 10:34
Surname: HEALD

Forename(s): Edgar

Place of Birth: Skipton, Yorkshire

Residence: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Service No: 306235

Rank: Drummer

Regiment/Corps/Service: Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment)

Battalion/Unit: 2/7th Battalion

Division: 62nd (2/West Riding) Division

Age: 23

Date of Death: 1917-05-03

Awards: -----

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: Bay 6.

CWGC Cemetery: -----

CWGC Memorial: ARRAS MEMORIAL

Non-CWGC Burial: -----

Comments:

1901 Barnoldswick Census: Edgar Heald, aged 6 years, born Skipton, son of John and Sarah Alice Heald.

Craven's Part in the Great War Entry:

DRUMMER EDGAR HEALD, Duke of Well.'s Regt., son of Mr. & Mrs. John Heald, 50, Wellhouse Road, Barnoldswick, presumed killed 3rd May, 1917. Aged 23 years.

West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record Entry:

HEALD, Drummer Edgar, aged 23 years, West Riding Regiment, son of Mr. and Mrs. John Heald, 50, Wellhouse Road, [Barnoldswick], reported missing May 3, 1917, now presumed dead

Article Date: 08 June 1917
BARNOLDSWICK SOLDIERS MISSING
Several Barnoldswick soldiers have this week been reported 'missing' on the Western Front, amongst the batch being two weel-known ex-Boy Scouts.
Drummer Edgar Heald, Duke of Wellington's, has been officially posted "missing" since May 3rd, after two years in France. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. John Heald, 50, Wellhouse Road, and before enlisting had been connected with the local Boy Scout movement for several years.

Article Date: 08 February 1918
HEALD - Death presumed of Drummer Edgar Heald, Duke of Wellington's Regiment, missing since April 3rd, 1917, son of Mr. and Mrs. John Heald, 50, Wellhouse Road, Barnoldswick, aged 23 years

Article Date: 08 February 1918
BARNOLDSWICK SOLDIER MISSING SINCE MAY
Mr. and Mrs. John Heald, 50, Wellhouse Road, have received an official intimation presuming the death of their son, Drummer Edgar Heald, Duke of Wellington's Regiment, who had been missing since May 3rd, 1917. Drummer Heald, who was 23 years of age, enlisted in January, 1915, and went out to France just over a year ago. Three of his brothers are serving - one in France, one in Salonika and one in Mesopotamia.

.

Article Date: 08 June 1917
Article Date: 08 February 1918
HEALD - Missing since May 3rd, 1917, now pronounced dead, Drummer Edgar Heald, of the Duke of Wellington's West Riding Regiment, son of Mr. and Mrs. John Heald, of 30, Wellhouse Road, Barnoldswick, aged 23


thomo Go to Top of Page
thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 23/11/2011 : 10:49
Surname: HEAP

Forename(s): Wilfred Henry

Place of Birth: -----

Residence: -----

Service No: 72166

Rank: Private

Regiment/Corps/Service: Machine Gun Corps (Infantry)

Battalion/Unit: -----

Division: division unknown

Age: 22

Date of Death: 1920-01-09

Awards: -----

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: -----

CWGC Cemetery: -----

CWGC Memorial: -----

Non-CWGC Burial: BARNOLDSWICK (ST MARY-LE-GILL) CHURCHYARD

Comments:

No entry in SD- post-War.

Not identified in CWGC.

British Army WW1 Medal Rolls Index Cards: Pte Wilfred H. Heap, 12104, Royal Highlanders; and 72166, Machine Gun Corps.

Craven's Part in the Great War Entry:

PRIVATE WILFRED HENRY HEAP, M.G.C., son-in-law of the late Mr. Robert Wilcock, 16, Stuart Street, Barnoldswick; died January 9th, 1920 from tuberculosis, following upon wounds received in action in France. Aged 22 years.

Article Date: 16 January 1920
BARNOLDSWICK - TWO DEATHS IN ONE HOUSE
The death occurred on Thursday of last week, after 16 weeks' illness, of Mr. Robert Wilcock, 16 Stuart Street, at the age of 69 years. Deceased was a native of Bentham, but came to Barnoldswick while a young man, and was for some years engaged in farming at Coldweather House Farm, near Blacko. Latterly he followed the occupation of a weaver. He leaves a widow, three sons and an adopted daughter.
The other photograph reproduced above is that of Private Wilfred Henry Heap, son-in-law of the above, whose death occurred on the following day (Friday) as the result of wounds received in France. Though only 22years of age he had four years' service. He enlisted in the Black Watch soon after the outbreak of war, being subsequently transferred to the M.G.C., and was discharged from hospital a year ago, having been shot through the left lung while in France. On returning to civil life he was granted a life pension of 8s. 6d. per week, but owing to his inability to follow his former employment as a sheeting-weaver he was placed on full pension for a short time. After further medical examination the allowance was reduced to 12/6 per week. During the past six weeks, however, he became a prey to tuberculosis, to which the injury in his lung rendered him double susceptible, and which was the immediate cause of death. He leaves a wife and one child. The funeral of both the deceased took place at Gill Church on Monday afternoon, the Rev. Brinley Abbott (curate) officiating


thomo Go to Top of Page
thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 23/11/2011 : 10:50
Surname: HEAPS

Forename(s): Robert

Place of Birth: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Residence: -----

Service No: 19873

Rank: Private

Regiment/Corps/Service: East Lancashire Regiment

Battalion/Unit: 6th (Service) Battalion

Division: 13th (Western) Division

Age: 28

Date of Death: 1916-04-09

Awards: -----

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: Addenda Panel

CWGC Cemetery: -----

CWGC Memorial: BASRA MEMORIAL

Non-CWGC Burial: -----

Comments:

Not identified in SD.

1901 Barnoldswick Census: Robert Heap, aged 13 years, born Barnoldswick, grandson of Martha Heap. [Robert was probably the son of J. W. and Maggie Heaps, who were living in East Hill Street, Barnoldswick at the time of the 1901 Census. Martha had a son named John W. Heaps.]

The Craven Herald and the West Yorkshire Pioneer articles of the 5th May, 1916, state that he was killed in Mesopotamia with the 6th Battalion East Lancashire Regiment on the 9th April, 1916.

Craven's Part in the Great War Entry:

PRIVATE ROBERT HEAPS, East Lancs. Regt., of 86, Rainhall Road, Barnoldswick, killed in action with Indian Exp. Force 19th April, 1916. Aged 28 years.

 

West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record Entry:

HEAPS, Robert, aged 28 years, E.L. Regt., killed in action in Mesopotamia, April 9, 1916.

Article Date: 05 May 1916
BARNOLDSWICK SOLDIER KILLED IN MESOPOTAMIA
Pte. Robert Heaps, 6th East Lancs. Regiment, has been officially reported killed in action while serving with the Indian Expeditionary Force for the relief of General Townshend's beleaguered garrison on April 9th. The news was received on Tuesday in a letter from the Record Office at Preston.
Pte. Heaps was 28 years of age and unmarried. He enlisted in the regulars in March, 1915, and after a short training was sent to the Dardanelles, where he remained until the evacuation. Previous to joining the Army he worked as a weaver at Messrs. B. Holden's Moss Shed. He spent his last and only furlough at his home, 86, Rainhall Road, in July last. His father, the late J. W. Heaps, died in Leeds Infirmary on April


thomo Go to Top of Page
thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 23/11/2011 : 10:51
Surname: HEBDEN

Forename(s): Robert

Place of Birth: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Residence: -----

Service No: 29/618

Rank: Private

Regiment/Corps/Service: Northumberland Fusiliers

Battalion/Unit: 12th (Service) Battalion

Division: 21st Division

Age: 36

Date of Death: 1917-04-02

Awards: -----

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: Bay 2 and 3.

CWGC Cemetery: -----

CWGC Memorial: ARRAS MEMORIAL

Non-CWGC Burial: -----

Comments:

Robert Hebden survived the sinking of the ''Lusitania' on May 7, 1915, but his wife, Clara, perished. She was the sister of Lance-Corporal William Dewhurst (67733) - see his CH article from 1919-07-04 - and Pte. Thomas Dewhurst (270379).

On the 10th August 1917, the 12th Bn Northumberland Fusiliers amalgamated with the 13th Bn Northumberland Fusiliers to form the 12th/13th Bn Northumberland Fusiliers.

Craven's Part in the Great War Entry:

PRIVATE ROBERT HEBDEN, Northumberland Fusiliers, of 41, Church Street, Barnoldswick, killed in action 2nd April, 1917. Aged 36 years.

 

West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record Entry:

HEBDEN, Robert, aged 36 years, Northumberland Fusiliers, Church Street, [Barnoldswick], killed in action

Article Date: 14 May 1915
HEBDEN - Drowned in Lusitania outrage, May 7th, Mrs. Clara Hebden, daughter of Mrs. Dewhirst, 3, Federation Street, Barnoldswick.

Article Date: 14 May 1915
THE 'LUSITANIA' OUTRAGE - A BARNOLDSWICK VICTIM - BROUGHT HOME FOR BURIAL
The first intimation that any Barnoldswick people were on the ill-fated liner was conveyed by a telegram received on Saturday morning by Mrs. Thos. Dewhirst, 3, Federation Street, from her son-in-law, Mr. Robert Hebden, in the following words:- 'Bob picked up; heard nothing of Clara yet.' Before going out to America about two years ago Mr. and Mrs. Hebden were both employed as weavers and followed the same occupation at New Bedford, Massachusetts, where they are reported to have done very well.
No further news came to hand until Tuesday morning, when the following letter, dated 'Westbourne Hotel, Queenstown, Sunday, May 9th,' was received from the distressed husband: "Just a few lines to let you know we were on the Lusitania. I am sorry to say Clara went down, and I was almost gone. I was picked up. The sight was awful. They didn't give the passengers a chance to save their lives. It went down in a quarter of an hour from being torpedoed. I am bringing the body home. I shall start from here on Monday after dinner to Dublin, then sail to Holyhead by the midnight boat. You can make arrangements about the grave. There is another lady bringing a body on the same boat to Nelson. The sight to-day here is awful - thousands of people broken-hearted, some claiming wives, some husbands, some daughters and sisters or brothers. I think I shall be in Tuesday afternoon if everything goes well. - From your broken-hearted son, Bob."
Pathetic Tragedy of a Surprise Visit

The body of Mrs. Hebden arrived at Barnoldswick on Tuesday shortly before noon, being met at the station by a hearse and conveyed to the residence of Mrs. Dewhirst, mother of the deceased.
In a brief interview with our representative Mr. Hebden said his wife was 28 years of age. They were coming back to England to stay, unknown to their relatives, to whom it was their intention of giving a little surprise by sending a wire on arrival at Liverpool. Up to the time of the disaster they had had a splendid voyage. "I was walking round the lower deck (he proceeded) when the explosion took place - not a very loud crash - and never saw anything of my wife who was with another lady at the time. I made my way to the second-class deck to one of the boats, but whilst it was being lowered it tilted about six feet from the water, precipitating nearly all the occupants into the sea. Getting into another boat, the plug came out of the bottom and it filled with water, so that we were scrambling for our lives all the time in clinging to the boat, which kept reversing. Eventually we managed to climb on to the upturned boat and remained in that position for one and a half hours, thinking every moment would be our last. Subsequently we got on to a collapsible boat from which we were rescued by a torpedo boat. During all this I never saw anything of my wife and was not aware that her body had been recovered until I identified it in the mortuary."
In reply to questions Mr. Hebden said he never saw anything of the submarine, nor heard of the warning published in the New York paper until after his arrival at Queenstown.
The funeral of Mrs. Hebden took place yesterday afternoon at Gill Churchyard. A large crowd of sympathisers assembled in Federation Street prior to the cortege leaving the house. In addition to the family mourners, chief amongst them were Mr. Hebden (husband), and Mrs. Thos. Dewhirst (mother of the deceased) there were also present two survivors from the Lusitania - Mrs. Duckworth, of Blackburn, and Master Arthur Scott, of Nelson. The coffin was covered with beautiful floral tributes, amongst the number being wreaths from the workpeople at Messrs. Whiteoak's, West field Shed (where deceased and her husband were formerly employed) and one from the committee of the Barnoldswick Conservative Club. The obsequies at Gill were conducted by the Rev. F.W. Patten, M.A., (vicar), and there also a sympathetic crowd had assembled. The funeral arrangements were carried out by Messrs. Brigg and Duxbury

Article Date: 14 May 1915
ON BOARD THE 'LUSITANIA'
BARNOLDSWICK RESIDENT DROWNED - DISTRESSING SCENES
Germany's outrage at the sinking of the 'Lusitania' has brought mourning and sorrow into Barnoldswick homes, for Mr. and Mrs. Robert Hebden, two former residents of the town, were passengers aboard the vessel and only the husband has survived the terrible experiences of the weekend disaster.
The deceased lady was the daughter of Mrs. Tom Dewhurst of 3 Federation Street, Barnoldswick, and her husband, although not a native of the town, lived in Barnoldswick for a number of years previous to their wedding and subsequent emigration to America. Both husband and wife were employed as weavers at Messrs. Brooks' Westfield Shed. Two years ago they left the district for the U.S.A. and settled down in New Bedford, Massachusetts, where similar employment to that of the hometown was to be procured. Mr. and Mrs. Hebden got on well in America, but decided they would return to Barnoldswick again and secured berths upon the 'Lusitania', without having informed their relatives in England of the projected return, intending to send a telegram announcing their arrival from Queenstown. In American, Mr. and Mrs. Hebden heard or saw nothing of the German Government's warnings that the vessel was marked down for destruction, and a very pleasant passage was made until the dastardly deed occurred.

LETTER FROM MR. HEBDEN
The letter reads as follows:-
"Dear Mother, Just a line to let you know we were on the 'Lusitania'. I am sorry to say that Clara went down, and I was almost gone when I was picked up. The sight was awful. They (the Germans) did not give the passengers a chance to save their lives. It went down in a quarter of an hour from being torpedoed. I am bringing the body home... There is another lady bringing a body by the same train to Nelson. The sight out here is awful. Thousands of people are broken-hearted. Some claiming wives, some husbands, some children, and sisters and brothers. I think I shall be in on Tuesday afternoon. From your broken-hearted son. Bob."
As stated in the letter, Mr. Hebden arrived in Barnoldswick on Tuesday noon, bringing with him the body of his wife who was drowned, to be buried at Gill Cemetery on Thursday afternoon.
HOW THE VESSEL WENT DOWN
In an interview with a 'Pioneer' representative on Tuesday, Mr. Hebden gave a graphic account of the sinking of the liner, and one which corroborates many of the stories that were published in the daily press. His experiences were similar to those of many others in the time of great anxiety and danger. Mr. Hebden stated that the 'Lusitania' made a splendid voyage until the time she was torpedoed. He was walking on the lower deck at the time, and saw nothing of what took place previous to the explosions. Mrs. Hebden was at the time with a lady friend in another part of the boat. Mr. Hebden said:-
"I heard the explosion right under me. It did not make a very loud noise, though the ship shook once or twice. Then the ship began to lean over on its side and started to sink. At once everything was put into confusion. I rushed to the second boat deck and tried to find my wife, but I could not see her. People were shouting and many women and children cried as the ship listed over more and more. One lifeboat was filled with people, and when about six feet from the water the davits broke and it fell."
Proceeding, Mr. Hebden described how he got into a lifeboat, in which evidently the plug was out of place, and it began to fill with water. The result was that the people in the boat were thrown into the sea, and as the lifeboat turned topsy-turvy in the water, they clung to the sides. They were in a precarious position for quite a long time, fearing that they would not be able to hold on, or that the boat would sink beneath them, as it threatened to do. The experience was a terrible one. Mr. Hebden related how he saw the liner list more and more then sink bows first. It was all over in 18 minutes, and very many lives were lost.
"All around were people, some swimming in the water, others clinging to lifebelts and very feeble wreckage supports. I saw people who were past aid sink, but I never saw a trace of the murderers who brought all this awful loss of life about."

RESCUED
Mr. Hebden and his party, who were clinging to the overturned boat, were later taken aboard one of the collapsible lifeboats which had been successfully launched, and from this were transferred to one of the torpedo-boat destroyers, which were sent on an errand of mercy as soon as the news of the disaster was known. They had been in the water over two hours and all were in an exhausted condition.
Mr. Hebden never saw his wife at all, until the sad moment when he identified her body in the mortuary at Queenstown. The memories of those sad moments it is impossible to describe. Everything possible was done for the survivors and the kindness and courtesy of the Irish folk and officials will forever be held in remembrance.
The funeral of Mrs. Hebden took place at the Gill Churchyard on Tuesday afternoon, the vicar, Rev. F.W. Patten, M.A., J.P., officiating. A large crowd of sympathising townspeople assembled in Federation Street to witness the departure of the cortege for Gill. In addition to the family mourners, chief amongst whom were the bereaved husband, Mr. Robert Hebden, and the mother of the deceased lady, Mrs. Thomas Dewhurst, there were also present two survivors from the torpedoed vessel: Mr. Duckworth, of Blackburn, and Master Arthur Scott, of Nelson. A number of beautiful wreaths and floral tributes were sent, including one from the family, the workpeople at Messrs. Whiteoak's Westfield Shed, where the deceased lady was formerly employed, and from the Barnoldswick Conservative Club. En route, window blinds were drawn by the inhabitants as a last token of sympathy and respect.

Article Date: 13 April 1917
HEBDEN - Killed in action in France, Pte. Robert Hardy, Northumberland Fusiliers, of 41, Church Street, Barnoldswick, aged 36 years

Article Date: 13 April 1917
LUSITANIA SURVIVOR KILLED IN FRANCE
News reached Barnoldswick yesterday of the death of Private Robert Hebden, Northumberland Fusiliers. He was 36 years of age. In a letter to Mrs. Hebden, who resides at 41, Church Street, Barnoldswick, Second-Lieut. W.M. Barber writes:- "Your husband was killed instantly whilst fighting bravely for his country. He was a most valuable soldier and is deeply mourned by his officers and comrades."

Pte. Hebden, who was a weaver by trade, had spent some years in the United States, and was one of the passengers rescued from the 'Lusitania' in the wreck of which his first wife perished. He went out to France last August.

Article Date: 04 July 1919
BARNOLDSWICK FAMILY'S THIRD BEREAVEMENT
The official intimation from the War Office presuming the death of Lance Corporal Wm. Dewhurst, Machine Gun Corps, represents the third loss during the war suffered by Mrs. Thos. Dewhurst, a widow residing at 3 Federation Street, Barnoldswick. Lance Corporal Dewhurst, who was 35 years of age and unmarried, had been missing since November 30th 1917, having arrived in France on the 17th March previous.
His elder brother, Pte. Thos. Dewhurst, was killed in August of the same year, while his only sister (Mrs. Robert Hebden) was lost on the Lusitania. Mrs. Dewhurst would be grateful for any more detailed information as to the fate of her son.


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Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 23/11/2011 : 10:52
Surname: HEYS

Forename(s): Robert Henry

Place of Birth: Bacup, Lancashire

Residence: Bacup, Lancashire

Service No: 241677

Rank: Private

Regiment/Corps/Service: East Lancashire Regiment

Battalion/Unit: 1/5th Battalion

Division: 42nd (East Lancashire) Division

Age: 40

Date of Death: 1917-04-28

Awards: -----

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: Pier and Face 6 C.

CWGC Cemetery: -----

CWGC Memorial: THIEPVAL MEMORIAL

Non-CWGC Burial: -----
Craven's Part in the Great War Entry:

PRIVATE ROBERT H. HEYES, East Lancs. Regt., of Bank Street, Barnoldswick, presumed killed 28th April, 1917. Aged 40 years.

 

West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record Entry:

HEYS, R.H., aged 23 years, East Lancs. Regt., 6, Bank Street, [Barnoldswick], reported missing April 28, 1917, now presumed dead.
Article Date: 15 March 1918
BARNOLDSWICK SOLDIER PRESUMED DEAD
The relatives of Private Robert Henry Heys, East Lancashire Regimen reported missing on April 28th, 1917, have been notified that he was killed in action on that date, He was 40 years of age and a native of Bacup, but had resided in Barnoldswick (at 6 Bank Street) for ten years prior to his voluntary enlistment in 1915. He served a short time in Egypt before going to France, where he had been only about ten weeks when he met his death in the first action in which he took part. He leaves a wife and one child now residing at Bacup. Private Heys was formerly a weaver at Messrs. Brown and Bailey's Long Ing, and attended Bethesda Baptist Church.

Article Date: 15 March 1918
HEYS - In loving memory of a dear husband and father, Pte. Robert Hy. Heys, who was killed in action, somewhere in France, April 28th, 1917.
Sleep on dear husband, and take thy rest,

For God takes those He loves the best;

On earth there's strife, in Heaven rest,

They miss you most who loved you best.
He didn't stop to reason when first the war began,

And went and did his duty like a soldier and a man;

But when the last reveille sounds, and when the battle's won,

His Maker, Whom he's gone to meet, will smile and say "Well done."
- From his sorrowing Wife and Child.

HEYS - In loving remembrance of our dear son and brother, Pte. R.H. Heys, who was killed in action, somewhere in France, April 28th, 1917.
If we could have raised his dying head,

Or heard his last farewell,

The grief would not have been so hard

For those who loved him well.
- From Mrs. Throup (mother-in-law), Florrie and Harold.
HEYS - In loving memory of Pte. Robert Hy. Heys, East Lancashire Regiment, killed in action in France April 28th, 1917 (previously reported missing), aged 40 years, formerly of 6, Bank Street, Barnoldswick.
Too far away thy grave to see,

But not too far to think of thee.
- From Mr. and Mrs. Gregory and Lizzie, 6, Bank Street, Barnoldswick.

Article Date: 15 March 1918
HEYS - Missing since April 28th, 1917, now believed dead, Pte. R.H. Heys, of the East Lancaster Regiment, husband of Mrs. Heys, of 6, Bank Street, Barnoldswick, aged 40.

1/5th Bn. East Lancashire Regiment
1917
On April 27th two platoons of 'A' Company, under Captain Cockshutt, attempted to occupy and consolidate an elongated belt of trees known as Canal Wood [Canal Wood was close to the Hindenburg Line to which the Germans had retired to after the Battles of the Somme in 1916], and this was an occasion of much individual but unavailing gallantry. An unexpected check was occasioned by a party of the enemy who occupied a small quarry at the north-east end of the wood, and these had to be bombed out. Having cleared the wood of Germans, the party, which comprised 3 officers and 98 rank and file, started to dig in and succeeded in constructing a trench to a depth of about four feet. The attacking platoons, however, did not reach their final objective until about 4.30 a.m. [28th April] and after desultory sniping for an hour or so from various directions, a body estimated at two companies attacked and succeeded in driving the Lancashire men on to the road. Here they were heavily enfiladed by machine-gun and rifle fire from the south. One of the party's Lewis guns was put out of action almost immediately and retirement to our own outpost line became essential. Captain Cockshutt was wounded and both his junior officers, 2nd Lieutenants Walkden and Edwards were killed. [Arthur Chamberlain Walkden and Harri Willis Edwards were both employed by the Bank of Liverpool and perhaps knew each other before joining the army] Eleven other ranks were killed and 30 wounded; 15 men were reported missing. Particular gallantry was shown in this affair by one of our sergeants, who brought several wounded men into our outpost line under heavy fire.

[Robert Henry Heys was killed in action on the28th April.]


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Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 24/11/2011 : 10:46
Surname: HEYWORTH

Forename(s): Harrison

Place of Birth: Bacup, Lancashire

Residence: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Service No: 9699

Rank: Private

Regiment/Corps/Service: Labour Corps

Battalion/Unit: 17th Coy

Division: not applicable

Age: 36

Date of Death: 1917-10-06

Awards: -----

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: III. C. 24.

CWGC Cemetery: ABBEVILLE COMMUNAL CEMETERY EXTENSION

CWGC Memorial: -----

Non-CWGC Burial: -----

Craven's Part in the Great War Entry:

PRIVATE HARRISON HEYWORTH, Labour Battn., formerly of 26, Denton Street, Barnoldswick, died from syncope in France 6th October, 1917.

West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record Entry:

HEYWORTH, H., Labour Corps, 26, Denton Street, [Barnoldswick], died from syncope, France, Oct. 6, 1917

Article Date: 12 October 1917
BARNOLDSWICK
Pte. Harrison Heyworth
News was received yesterday (Thursday) of the death of Private Harrison Heyworth, which occurred on October 6th at a South African hospital in France, from syncope, following an attack of phrygitis. For the past 15 months he had been attached to a labour battalion. His wife lives at 26, Denton Street, Barnoldswick


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Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 24/11/2011 : 10:47
Surname: HODKINSON

Forename(s): Harry

Place of Birth: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Residence: -----

Service No: M/10079

Rank: Senior Reserve Attendant

Regiment/Corps/Service: Royal Naval Auxiliary Sick Berth Reserve

Battalion/Unit: H.M.H.S. 'Rohilla'

Division: not applicable - Royal Navy

Age: 26

Date of Death: 1914-10-30

Awards: -----

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: 8.

CWGC Cemetery: -----

CWGC Memorial: CHATHAM NAVAL MEMORIAL

Non-CWGC Burial: -----

Comments:

No entry in SD - Navy.

1911 Barnoldswick Census: 14, Bank Street - Harry Hodkinson, aged 22 years, born Barnoldswick, son of William Edward and Maria Hodkinson.

Craven's Part in the Great War Entry:

PTE. H. HODKINSON, 14, Bank St., Barnoldswick, single.

West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record Entry:

HODKINSON, H., 14, Bank Street, [Barnoldswick], single. The above resided at Barnoldswick, being a member of the local branch of the St. John Ambulance Association, who were drowned when the 'Rohilla', a hospital ship on which they were serving as members of the Naval Sick Berth Reserve, went ashore at Whitby on October 30, 1914.


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2021 Posts
Posted - 24/11/2011 : 10:50
Surname: HOLDEN

Forename(s): John Henry

Place of Birth: -----

Residence: -----

Service No: 3368

Rank: Private

Regiment/Corps/Service: Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment)

Battalion/Unit: 1/6th Battalion

Division: 49th (West Riding) Division

Age: 23

Date of Death: 1916-07-26

Awards: -----

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: X. C. 5.

CWGC Cemetery: LONSDALE CEMETERY, AUTHUILE

CWGC Memorial: -----

Non-CWGC Burial: -----

Craven's Part in the Great War Entry:

PRIVATE JOHN HENRY HOLDEN, Duke of Well.'s Regt., nephew of Mr. & Mrs. W. Holden, 19, Lower North Avenue, Barnoldswick, killed in action July, 1916. Aged 23 years.

 

West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record Entry:

HOLDEN, John Henry, aged 23 years, Duke of Wellington's Regiment, nephew of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Holden, 19, Lower North Avenue, [Barnoldswick], killed in action in France July 1916.

Article Date: 20 November 1914
A RECRUITING SCOOP
A recruiting 'scoop' was made by the 6th Battalion West Riding Regiment when they persuaded a number of Barnoldswick men, who were connected with the St. John Ambulance Division, to join the ranks as a Bearer Company. Some of these men were viewed as prospective valuable additions to the complement of the Royal Naval Sick Berth Reserve, but the Army 'got there' first. The Bearer Company includes the following local men:- Sergt. P.H. Garnett, and Privates R.W.W. Collyer, J.W. Smith, George Harwood, George Harrison, F. Barker. J.E. Pickup, E. Schofield, W. Strickland, R. Harrison. E. Woodhead, S. Lee, F. Bracewell, J.H. Holden, J. Pickup. J.H. Whitley, and H. Thomas. Other men who have joined the Army this week are R. Metcalfe, W.J. Shuttleworth, and H. Blackburn.

Article Date: 04 August 1916
HOLDEN - Killed action in France, July, 1916, Pte. John Henry Holden, 1/6th Duke of Wellington's Regiment, nephew of Mr. and Mrs. Holden, 19, Lower North Avenue, Barnoldswick, aged 23 years.

Article Date: 04 August 1916
BARNOLDSWICK'S LENGTHENING DEATH ROLL - A Stretcher-bearer Killed
News of the death of two more Barnoldswick soldiers was received on Sunday. The first, Pte. John Hy. Holden, aged 23, was a stretcher-bearer with the 1st 6th Duke of Wellington's Regiment, with whom he went out to France in April last year along with Sergeant Garratt. He was a nephew of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Holden, 19, Lower North Avenue, with whom he had lived from childhood. Previous to joining the Army he was a weaver at Messrs. Nutter and Sons, Bankfield Shed. Pte. Holden was home on leave at Whitsuntide.
The following letter has been received from the Chaplain to the regiment (Rev. R. Shipman):- "It is a sad task for me to have to tell you that I buried your nephew this morning, along with eight other brave Yorkshire lads. It will be a very beautiful little cemetery, and is right up to the firing line. A cross is being put over his grave."
Pte. Holden was a member of the choir at Calf Hall Road Wesleyan Church, and secretary of the Sunday School.
Captain J. Alison Glover, R.A.M.C. writes:- "I have only been with the Regiment a little over three weeks, since their previous doctor was wounded, but Holden was with me at Battalion headquarters for a fortnight, so I soon got to know him. He was a splendid fellow, strong and absolutely devoid of fear. He was always ready for any duty and was extremely popular with all the men and officers, and particularly with his fellow stretcher-bearers who were much upset by his death. I went up to see him in the front line as soon as I heard he was badly wounded, and saw at once that the wound was mortal - a shell wound in the right side of the chest. I did not think he would live to be moved down, but his fellow bearers were very anxious to bring him down, thinking that possibly there might be a chance. I do not think he was sufficiently conscious to feel any pain, and he had a small dose of morphia. He lived to reach our aid-post where he was made as comfortable as possible, and then as they were anxious to get him to the Field Hospital (and I was sure that it would not give him pain) I allowed him to be removed to the collecting post. He died just as he got there, in the presence of the Chaplain. If you could have seen the tenderness and devotion he received from his fellow bearers, you would have known he died surrounded by friends who really loved him."
Article Date: 26 April 1918
Private Reuben Fryers, Barnoldswick
Confirmation has been received of the death (unofficially reported last week) of Pte. Reuben Fryers, of the 36th Labour Battalion, who was killed in action on March 21st. He went to France last September. Before joining the Army he lived with his brother at 47 Colin Street, and was connected with the Calf Hall Road Wesleyan Sunday School as secretary, in which he succeeded the late Pte. John H. Holden (also killed in France). Feeling references to his sterling character and usefulness were made at a memorial service held on Sunday evening by Mr. Bush and Mr. Whitehead. Mr. J. Parkington (secretary of the Soldiers and Sailors' Committee) read the Roll Call, and at the close the 'Dead March' was played by Miss Crossley (organist).

Article Date: 26 April 1918
CRAVEN AND THE WAR
Barnoldswick Soldiers Wounded
Pte. Thos. Holden, East Lancashire Regiment, has been wounded a second time, and is in hospital at Rouen. His injuries, which are described as serious, are to the left arm and thigh, and were caused by a bursting shell. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Holden, 19, Lower North Avenue, Barnoldswick, whose adopted son (Pte. J.H. Holden) was killed in France in 1916


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Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 24/11/2011 : 10:51
Surname: HOLLOWS

Forename(s): Arthur Purcell

Place of Birth: Bacup, Lancashire

Residence: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Service No: 18521

Rank: Private

Regiment/Corps/Service: Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment)

Battalion/Unit: 10th (Service) Battalion

Division: 23rd Division

Age: 22

Date of Death: 1916-07-30

Awards: -----

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: I. L. 4.

CWGC Cemetery: ALBERT COMMUNAL CEMETERY EXTENSION

CWGC Memorial: -----

Non-CWGC Burial: -----

Comments:

It has not been proven which battalion Arthur P. Hollows was serving with when he died of wounds.

Craven's Part in the Great War Entry:
PRIVATE A. P. HALLOWS, Duke of Well.'s Regt., of Barnoldswick, died of wounds 30th July, 1916. Aged 22 years.

Article Date: 25 August 1916
BARNOLDSWICK CASUALTIES
News only came to hand at the weekend that Private Arthur Purcell Hollows, 10th West Ridings, had been wounded in France on the 29th ult. He is the son of Mr. W. E. Hollows, 76, Upper York Street, Barnoldswick


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Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 24/11/2011 : 10:52
Surname: HOLMES

Forename(s): Wilfred

Place of Birth: Addingham, Yorkshire

Residence: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Service No: 10990

Rank: Private

Regiment/Corps/Service: Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment)

Battalion/Unit: 8th (Service) Battalion

Division: 11th (Northern) Division

Age: 20

Date of Death: 1917-04-27

Awards: -----

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: D. 6.

CWGC Cemetery: HERMIES BRITISH CEMETERY

CWGC Memorial: -----

Non-CWGC Burial: -----

Comments:

Brother-in-law of Elijah Sutcliffe (WR/25667) and William Hartley Sutcliffe (1324).

Craven's Part in the Great War Entry:

PRIVATE WILFRED HOLMES, Duke of Well.'s Regt., son of Mr. William Holmes, Addingham, killed in action 27th April, 1917. Aged 20 years.

 

West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record Entry:

HOLMES, Wilfred, aged 20 years, West Riding Regiment, son of the late Mr. Wm. Holmes of Addingham and Mrs. Holmes of Lower Brook Street, [Barnoldswick], killed in action April 27, 1917


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