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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted -  11/10/2011  :  15:24
Khaki in colour and sombre in content. "Cravens Part in the Great War", there will not have been many households in Barlick and what was then a much larger Craven Area, that did not have at least one copy of this book. In my immediate Family there would have been at least four and I still have two of them, albeit that one is with my son on Anglesey. Over the years I have seen them at jumble sales, in second hand shops and in piles of rubbish for disposal, even left behind when a house has been vacated. They will have turned up all over the place, I have come across them in Wales, the Isle of Wight and Hampshire, the two that I have belonged to my Father and Maternal Grandfather.
Many years ago I went through one of them from cover to cover noting those from Barlick who had given their lives in the service of King and Country, my notes are long gone so I am going to do it again, a few pages at a time, but this time I will include other local places within an approximate seven mile radius, Gisburn, Foulridge, Earby and so on. I will post my findings on here with the name, address and a precis of other details, as some are quite extensive, each name is to have the page number for my reference so that if anyone wants further information, I can soon find it. In a good number of cases there is a photograph, these I will copy and post in groups of ten at suitable intervals. In the book there are 391 pages so I will use a few abreviations hopefully all self explanatory, ie, KIA:- Killed in Action. MPD:- Missing presumed Dead. DOW:- Died as a result of Wounds, and one that is all too frequent, DFD:- Died from Disease or Illness.
One Man was responsible for the existance of these books and that was Mr, Walter Morrison Esq, JP of Malham Tarn who put forward the idea of the book and defrayed the entire cost.
There is quite a bit about the war itself up to page 50, including the Rohilla Tradgedy, then comes the dreadful list of those who did not come home, and so it is that on page 57 we find the first of Barlicks Sons, and is as follows:-

2nd Lieut Harry Thornton Pickles, 3rd Bn Duke of Wellington's (West Riding) Regiment (SR) second son of Mr Stephen Pickles JP, CC, Of Raysgill Barnoldswick KIA 26th April 1916 aged 26. P57.

In these first ten pages the extent of family loss is made very clear for it was in the Village of Carleton nr Skipton that this comes up:-

P53,  Lieut. Anthony E.K. Slingsby, 1/6th Duke of Wellington's (WR) Regiment, Son of Mr and Mrs J A Slingsby Carla Beck Carleton. KIA France 14th July 1915. Aged 26.
P57,  Captain Arthur Morris Slingsby, MC 56th Punjabi Rifles,  2nd son of Mr and Mrs J A Slingsby KIA 8th March 1916 in Mesopotamia. Aged 30.
P58.  Lieut. Stephen Slingsby of HMS Defence, 4th son of Mr and Mrs J A Slingsby. KIA in North Sea June 1916. Aged 24.
This out of a total of five sons all serving.
 
Lothersdale is the next local Village with on P62.  Lieut Alec Wilson, 1st Herefordshire Regiment, Son of Mr and Mrs F J Wilson JP of Lothersdale. KIA 26th March 1917 in Egypt.
P54, Lieut. The Hon, C. A. Lister Royal Marines, Hood Battalion, Only surviving son and heir of Lord Ribblesdale of Gisburne Park DOW 28th August 1915. Elder Brother killed in 1904 in Somaliland.
Greystones, Gisburn.  Lieut. George Proctor, Lancs Fusiliers, only son of Mr and Mrs Thomas Proctor. KIA 7th April 1918 aged 24. P70.
Marton is on P73, Which Marton is not clear,  2nd Lieut, Joseph Bryan Bushby South Staffs Regiment, son of Mr and Mrs Joseph Bushby, Schoolhouse Farm Marton, DOW, 4th October 1918 aged 26.



Ed

Edited by - thomo on 11/10/2011 4:05:43 PM


thomo
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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 30/10/2011 : 17:07
Good work Ian, I have just finished "B" and pulled loads more info, eventually we will find all there is to know, and then make sure it is kept safe for the future, any suggestions on that will be very welcome.


thomo Go to Top of Page
Callunna
Revolving Grey Blob


3044 Posts
Posted - 30/10/2011 : 18:57


quote:
moh wrote:
Apparently the TV programme Coast is doing a programme from Whitby and will be mentioning the Rohilla and interviewing the man who has written a book about it.  It will be shown sometime soon.

That would be OG member Whitby Colin, aka Colin Brittain. Lots of info on here about his work, including his book "Into The Maelstrom".Go to Top of Page
Callunna
Revolving Grey Blob


3044 Posts
Posted - 30/10/2011 : 19:02


quote:
thomo wrote:
Good work Ian, I have just finished "B" and pulled loads more info, eventually we will find all there is to know, and then make sure it is kept safe for the future, any suggestions on that will be very welcome.
Must have a chat with you soon, Peter. Have been talking to some others who, by pure coincidence, are doing similar kind of research (not identical).

I think with a bit of co-operation there could be the definitive work produced - what a great way to commemorate the centenary of the Great War in two years' time.  

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Callunna
Revolving Grey Blob


3044 Posts
Posted - 30/10/2011 : 19:09


quote:
thomo wrote:
Surname: ATKINSON

Forename(s): Maurice Chester

Place of Birth: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire


Mr. Alban Atkinson, uncle of the deceased, has received the following letter from Major Blue, of the Canadian Field Artillery:- "Your enquiry with reference to Gunner M. C. Atkinson arrived today. I regret to have to say that he was killed in action on July 16th. His work while with the battery was most excellent, and he was one of the finest signallers we had. We all miss him, as his cheerfulness even under the most trying circumstances was wonderful. Permit me to offer you the sincere sympathy of the Battery in your bereavement. He was killed instantly by a shell which burst near him, and was buried with the rites of his Church and a cross

I find these records fascinating. This person was the nephew of the first occupier of the house where I live now (Carr Atkinson, Alban's brother).

OK, so that info has no relevance to the research, but on a personal level it makes it all seem so real, and not simply lines of text in a history book.Go to Top of Page
thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 30/10/2011 : 23:31
Well I am all in favour of Co-operation on a subject of this nature, the more input, the better the picture. and as I said earlier , anyone who wants a copy when I have done will be welcome. Thankfully I have a massive data space that stores the interim and final findings, the initial work being done on the "C" drive. I have been through all 2665 entries once and pulled the basics for each Barlick entry, I am now going through them all again and looking into every link available to gain the maximum amount of info in each case, so Heather, it may be a while yet before I can field the "Brave Barlick Terriers" poem. If it rains all week I could be there by Friday!!


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Callunna
Revolving Grey Blob


3044 Posts
Posted - 31/10/2011 : 10:23
Peter, I'd really like to have a chat with you as something has come up which you might find quite interesting.

Maybe Ian and Andy would be interested too. Perhaps we could all meet up some time? Maybe after the Gill search on Nov 6?Go to Top of Page
thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 31/10/2011 : 10:51
I am intrigued Heather and look forward to hearing what you have to say. In the meantime here are two more locals:-

Surname: ATKINSON

Forename(s): Thomas

Place of Birth: Burnley, Lancashire

Residence: -----

Service No: 206186

Rank: Private

Regiment/Corps/Service: Heavy Branch Machine Gun Corps

Battalion/Unit: F Battalion. 3rd Tank Brigade

Division: not applicable

Age: 33

Date of Death: 1917-07-07

Awards: -----

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: I. A. 14.

CWGC Cemetery: GWALIA CEMETERY

CWGC Memorial: -----

Non-CWGC Burial: -----

Comments:

The Heavy Branch Machine Gun Corps was renamed the Tank Corps on the 27th July 1917.

British Army WW1 Medal Rolls Index Cards: Pte Thomas Atkinson, 206186, Tank Corps.
 

Craven's Part in the Great War Entry:

PRIVATE THOMAS ATKINSON, M.T., formerly of 15, Commercial Terrace, Barnoldswick, killed in action 6th July, 1917. Aged 33 years

 

West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record Entry:

ATKINSON, Thomas, aged 33 years, A.S.C. (M.T.), 15, Cornmill Terrace, [Barnoldswick], killed in action July 6, 1917.

from Soldiers Died Records

Surname: ATKINSON

Forename(s): Thomas

Born: -----

Residence: -----

Enlisted: Burnley, Lancashire

Number: 206186

Rank: Private

Regiment: Tank Corps

Battalion: -----

Decorations: -----

Died Date: 1917-07-07

Died How: Killed in action

Theatre of War: France & Flanders

Article Date: 20 July 1917
BARNOLDSWICK - TWO MORE BARNOLDSWICK SOLDIERS KILLED: A TANK DRIVER'S DEATH
Mrs. T. Atkinson, 15, Commercial Terrace, Barnoldswick, last week received a letter from an officer stating that her husband, Private Thomas Atkinson, had been killed by a shell whilst driving a 'tank' in France on July 6th. Deceased, who was 33 years of age, was a native of Burnley but had lived some time in Barnoldswick, and was employed as a weaver by Messrs. J. Moorhouse and Son prior to enlistment in the Tyneside Scottish. He was subsequently transferred to the Motor Transport Section, and was placed in charge of a 'tank.' He had only been in France about two months. He leaves a widow and two children.

Article Date: 20 July 1917
ATKINSON - Killed in action, July 6th, Pte. Thomas Atkinson, of the Motor Transport section husband of Mrs. Atkinson, of 15, Cornmill Terrace, Barnoldswick, aged 33.

Surname: AYRTON

Forename(s): Frank

Place of Birth: Gargrave, Yorkshire

Residence: -----

Service No: 62480

Rank: Private

Regiment/Corps/Service: King's Own (Yorkshire Light Infantry)

Battalion/Unit: 5th Battalion

Division: 62nd (2/West Riding) Division

Age: 18

Date of Death: 1918-08-12

Awards: -----

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: B. 13

CWGC Cemetery: ST GERMAIN-AU-MONT-D'OR COMMUNAL CEMETERY EXTENSION

CWGC Memorial: -----

Non-CWGC Burial: -----

Comments:

On the 2nd February 1918 the 1/5th Bn K.O.Y.L.I. moved from the 49th (West Riding) Division to the 62nd (2/West Riding) Division. The battalion absorbed the 2/5th Battalion, K.O.Y.L.I. becoming the 5th Battalion.

Craven's Part in the Great War Entry:

PRIVATE FRANK AYRTON, K.O.Y.L.I. son of Mr. & Mrs. John Thomas Ayrton, 63, Gisburn Road, Barnoldswick, died of wounds 12th August, 1918. Aged 18 years.

 

West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record Entry:

AYRTON, F., aged 18, K.O.Y.L.I., 163, Gisburn Road, [Barnoldswick], died of wounds July 20, 1918.

Article Date: 23 August 1918
Barnoldswick Fatalities
Pte. Frank Ayrton, K.O.Y.L.I., who died at St. Germains, France, on Aug. 12th, from wounds received on July 20th, was 18 years of age, and the son of Mr. and Mrs. J.T. Ayrton. 163, Gisburn Road, Barnoldswick (formerly of Gargrave). He had only been in France 10 weeks. When a report of their son's precarious condition was received by the parents, the latter cabled to another son serving in the A.S.C in Italy, who obtained facilities for visiting his brother at St. Germains, and was thus enabled to be with him for a couple of days before the end came. Pte. Ayrton was a particularly bright and promising lad, and connected with the Wesleyan Sunday School. Up to the time at his joining the army he was employed as a cloth-looker by Mr. R. Brooks, Westfield Shed.


Edited by - thomo on 31/10/2011 10:55:47 AM


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panbiker
Senior Member


2301 Posts
Posted - 31/10/2011 : 14:11
I will also look forward to hearing what you have to say Heather. Merlin Suite at Rolls after our foray?

I have been giving some thought to where Wilfred may be laid to rest. We know that he is down at Ghyll somewhere in the undenominational section but I was thinking that from what we know, he and his family did not move to Barlick until some time after the 1901 census which has them living in Bacup. At the time of his death in 1918 he is married and working in Barlick as a twister at the mill. This begs the question, which family plot would he have been buried in? The newspaper report only mentions that he is the son of James Anker and does not mention his mother at that date. I wonder if his mother had pre-deceased him and was also buried at Ghyll. This can be the only logical explanation if he was indeed interred in an existing family plot as clearly his father is still alive in 1918. I suppose he could also have siblings that may have died and be down at Ghyll also.


Ian Go to Top of Page
thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 01/11/2011 : 16:31
An e/mail from Canada this morning asking for copies of some of this, which will be sent in due course, for now though here is another:-

Surname: BAILEY

Forename(s): George Alfred

Place of Birth: Skipton, Yorkshire

Residence: -----

Service No: 5362

Rank: Private

Regiment/Corps/Service: Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment)

Battalion/Unit: 2/6th Battalion

Division: 62nd (2/West Riding) Division

Age: 38

Date of Death: 1916-11-10

Awards: -----

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: 113.

CWGC Cemetery: MORECAMBE & HEYSHAM (MORECAMBE) CEMETERY

CWGC Memorial: -----

Non-CWGC Burial: -----

 

West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record Entry:

BAILEY, George, A., late of Skipton and Barnoldswick, aged 38, died at Clipstone Camp Nov. 10, 1916.

 

Date: 17 November 1916
BARNOLDSWICK - DROWNED AT CLIPSTONE CAMP
A private in the Duke of Wellington's Regiment, George Alfred Bailey, single, aged 18, a native of Barnoldswick, was missing from Clipstone Camp on Monday week, and on Friday last his dead body was found in the stream known as the Flood Dykes, which irrigates meadow land on the Duke of Portland's Notts. estate.
It appeared from the evidence that Bailey had been in very indifferent health for some time, having twice been in hospital with rupture. Of late he had been very despondent, and when last seen was sitting with his head in his hands. The body was found 100 yards away from the road in seven feet water.
Several letters of an affectionate character from the dead man's sisters, who reside at Morecambe, were in his pocket, but nothing was found on him bearing on his death.
A Juror: Is there anything in the correspondence referring to any unfair treatment at the camp?
Police Sergeant Tomlinson: There is nothing in them to show he has complained about anything.
The Juror: I only raise this matter as there have been questions put in Parliament about the treatment of soldiers at this camp, and it is the duty of a jury to find whether there is anything the matter.
The Coroner: I quite agree it is the duty of a jury to find out as far as possible whether the soldiers are properly treated and to see whether there is any real ground for complaint.
Quartermaster-Sergeant I. Walker produced the man's record, showing that he had twice been to hospital, and had been frequently excused duty owing to ill-health. He had seven days' leave on October 16th, and went to Morecambe. On October 25th he again reported sick, and was excused duty for the week.
The Coroner advised the jury that there was no evidence to justify them in saying the man committed suicide.
The jury returned an open verdict; and added an assurance that they did not consider Bailey had been ill-treated. In view of the statements made concerning the camp, they thought their opinion should go to the public.



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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 01/11/2011 : 16:34
And another:-

Surname: BAILEY

Forename(s): John

Place of Birth: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Residence: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Service No: 40753

Rank: Private

Regiment/Corps/Service: South Staffordshire Regiment

Battalion/Unit: 2/5th Battalion

Division: 59th (2/North Midland) Division

Age: 36

Date of Death: 1917-09-26

Awards: -----

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: Panel 90 to 92 and 162 to 162A

CWGC Cemetery: -----

CWGC Memorial: TYNE COT MEMORIAL

Non-CWGC Burial: -----

Comments:

British Army WW1 Medal Rolls Index Cards: Pte John Bailey, 40753, South Staffordshire Regiment.
 

Craven's Part in the Great War Entry:

PRIVATE JOHN BAILEY, South Staffs. Regt., of 35, Long Ing Lane, Barnoldswick, killed in action 26th September, 1917. Aged 36 years.

 

West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record Entry:

BAILEY, John, aged 36, South Staffs. Regt., 35, Long Ing Lane, [Barnoldswick], killed in action Sept. 26, 1917.

Data from Soldiers Died Records

Surname: BAILEY

Forename(s): John

Born: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Residence: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Enlisted: Keighley, Yorkshire

Number: 40753

Rank: Private

Regiment: South Staffordshire Regiment

Battalion: 2/5th (T.F.) Battalion

Decorations: -----

Died Date: 1917-09-26

Died How: Killed in action

Theatre of War: France & Flanders

Notes: Formerly 31656, West Riding Regiment

Article Date: 11 October 1918
PRIVATE JOHN BAILEY, BARNOLDSWICK

Mrs. Bailey, 35 Long Ing Lane, Barnoldswick, has received a War Office notification presuming the death of her husband, Private John Bailey, South Staffs., previously reported missing on September 26th 1917. He was 36 years of age, and the son of Mr. John Bailey, poultry dealer, Barnoldswick. Private Bailey had only been in France about two months on the above date. Formerly employed by the Cooperative Society as milk salesman, for a short time prior to enlistment he worked for Messrs. Dewhurst, Long Ing Shed.

Date: 16 November 1917
BARNOLDSWICK - 'MISSING'
Mrs. Bailey, 35, Long Ing Lane, Barnoldswick, has received the following letter from an officer at the Front in reference to her husband, Private J. Bailey, South Staffordshire Regiment, who has been missing since 25th September:- "It is with deepest regret that I have to inform you that Private J. Bailey has been missing since 25th September, when his Company went into action. I am sorry to say also that nothing has been heard of him since that date despite all our efforts. I should have written before, but have waited in the hope of news. It would be unkind to hold out to you any hopes, though I am not justified in saying there are none. In conclusion, perhaps the best tribute I can pay him is that he was, whilst under my command, a soldier in the real sense of the word. ERNEST D. ROBERTS, 2nd Lt."
Private Bailey went to France in August. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. John Bailey, 1, North Avenue, and was formerly a weaver at Messrs. Dewhurst's Long Ing Shed.



Edited by - thomo on 01/11/2011 4:36:53 PM


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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 02/11/2011 : 09:22
Surname: BALDWIN

Forename(s): Alfred

Place of Birth: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Residence: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Service No: 20863

Rank: Private

Regiment/Corps/Service: East Lancashire Regiment

Battalion/Unit: 6th (Service) Battalion

Division: 13th (Western) Division

Age: 36

Date of Death: 1916-04-09

Awards: -----

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: Panel 19.

CWGC Cemetery: -----

CWGC Memorial: BASRA MEMORIAL

Non-CWGC Burial: -----

Comments:

Craven's Part in the Great War Entry:

PRIVATE ALFRED BALDWIN, East Lancs. Regt., son of Mrs. Baldwin, 3, Bessie Street, Barnoldswick, officially presumed killed in Mesopotamia 9th April, 1916. Aged 36 years.

 

West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record Entry:

BALDWIN, Alfred, East Lancs. Regiment, son of Mrs. Baldwin, 3, Bessie Street, [Barnoldswick], presumed killed, Mesopotamia, April 9, 1916.

MESOPOTAMIA, 1916
6th (Service) Bn. East Lancashire Regiment
The position had been assaulted on April 6th by the 7th Indian Division and this had failed.
Sannaiyat is on the southern edge of Suwaikaiya Marsh, 2 miles from the River Tigris.
The troops moved forward on the evening of the 8th April, deploying on the line of the British trenches 650 yards from the Turks. Every man carried 200 rounds of ammunition . . . all were confident of success.
It was a cold night and when all were in position the troops- lying motionless in the open, for all movement and noise were strictly prohibited- soon became benumbed, and the keen edge of their anticipation was blunted. At 4.20 a.m. [9th] the advance began, but collision with a Turkish patrol had already given warning to the enemy; when the leading line was still 250 yards

from the hostile trenches a red flare went up from a spot near the marsh. Almost at once the whole scene was lit by flares, and a devastating fire from artillery, and from machine-guns and rifles, opened up on the British. This did not check the front line in spite of the losses inflicted, but only groups of men were able to reach and enter the first Turkish trench where for a time they maintained an unequal struggle.. . . As dawn came and the British artillery opened, it was clear that the attack had failed. Turks and Arabs were seen to leave the hostile trenches and club the British wounded, until driven in by fire. Casualties were 9 officers and 137 other ranks of which 67 were reported as 'missing believed killed'.
[Alfred Baldwin was killed on the 9th April.

Article Date: 14 July 1916

BARNOLDSWICK CASUALTIES - KILLED, WOUNDED AND MISSING
Pte. Alfred Baldwin, East Lancs. Regiment, (Indian Expeditionary Force) has been missing in Mesopotamia since 9th April. His last letter to his mother, who resides in Bessie Street, Barnoldswick, was dated April 8th

Article Date: 30 November 1917
BARNOLDSWICK - MISSING TWENTY MONTHS
After a lapse of twenty months the Army Council have sent Mrs. Baldwin, 3 Bessie Street, Barnoldswick, an intimation presuming the death of her son, Private Alfred Baldwin, East Lancs. Regiment, who was first reported missing in Mesopotamia on the 9th April 1916. He left England in September 1915 for the Dardanelles, where he took part in the fighting for three months before going to Mesopotamia in the January following. Private Baldwin was 36 years of age, single, and lived with his mother at the above address. Prior to enlisting he was a weaver at Messrs. S. Pickles and Sons, Calf Hall Shed.

Private Robert Wilson (now a prisoner of war in Germany) is his brother-in-law

Edited by - thomo on 02/11/2011 09:29:12 AM


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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 02/11/2011 : 13:16
Surname: BALDWIN

Forename(s): Harry

Place of Birth: Blackburn, Lancashire

Residence: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Service No: 203502

Rank: Private

Regiment/Corps/Service: Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment)

Battalion/Unit: 1/4th Battalion

Division: 49th (West Riding) Division

Age: 29

Date of Death: 1918-04-29

Awards: -----

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: XV. I. 1.

CWGC Cemetery: DOZINGHEM MILITARY CEMETERY

CWGC Memorial: -----

Non-CWGC Burial: -----

Comments:

Craven's Part in the Great War Entry:

PRIVATE HARRY BALDWIN, Duke of Well.'s Regt., of 8, Colne Road, Barnoldswick, died of wounds 29th April, 1918. Aged 29 years.

Private Harry Baldwin, Duke of Wellington's Regiment, died of gunshot wounds in a French hospital on the 29th April. A native of Blackburn, he lived in Barnoldswick three years prior to enlistment in July, 1916, and worked for Messrs. J. Windle and Sons, Wellhouse Mill. Private Baldwin was 29 years of age, and leaves a wife and one child living at 8 Colne Road, Barnoldswick.
BALDWIN - In loving memory of Private Harry Baldwin, Duke of Wellington's Regiment, who was killed in action April 29th, aged 29 years (formerly of Blackburn).
A loving husband, a faithful friend,

One of the best that God could lend;

O God, how mysterious are Thy ways

To take my dear husband in the best of his days.
From his Wife and Child, 8 Colin Street, Barnoldswick.

Article Date: 24 May 1918


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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 02/11/2011 : 22:33
Image


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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 03/11/2011 : 10:46
I have already posted that some truly amazing stuff turns up in news items based on letters home, and interviews. This morning I have read a very graphic account of the sinking of the "Lusitania" by a Barlick man who survived it but lost his wife in the tradgedy, Look out for the name Hebden when it is posted.

Surname: BANKS

Forename(s): Alfred

Place of Birth: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Residence: Stockport, Cheshire

Service No: 266006

Rank: Private

Regiment/Corps/Service: Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment)

Battalion/Unit: 1/6th Battalion

Division: 49th (West Riding) Division

Age: 23

Date of Death: 1918-11-01

Awards: -----

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: C. 7.

CWGC Cemetery: MAING COMMUNAL CEMETERY EXTENSION

CWGC Memorial: -----

Non-CWGC Burial: -----

Comments:

1901 Barnoldswick Census: Alfred Banks, age 5 years, born Barnoldswick, son of John W. and Jane E. Banks.

Craven's Part in the Great War Entry:

PRIVATE A. BANKS, Duke of Well.'s Regt., late of Barnoldswick, killed in action 1st November, 1918. Aged 25 years.

 

West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record Entry:

BANKS, Alfred, aged 23, 1/6th Duke of Wellington's Regiment, 15, Arthur Street, Sough Bridge, [Earby], and son of Mr. and Mrs. J.W. Banks, 20, Louvain Street, Barnoldswick, killed in action Nov. 1, 1918. BANKS, Alfred, aged 23, West Riding Regiment, Louvain Street, [Barnoldswick], killed in action Nov. 1, 1918.



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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 03/11/2011 : 11:19
Sinking of the "Lusitania". I have cut this out of the full report to be posted later:-

HOW THE VESSEL WENT DOWN
In an interview with a 'Pioneer' representative on Tuesday, Mr. Hebden gave a graphic account of the sinking of the liner, and one which corroborates many of the stories that were published in the daily press. His experiences were similar to those of many others in the time of great anxiety and danger. Mr. Hebden stated that the 'Lusitania' made a splendid voyage until the time she was torpedoed. He was walking on the lower deck at the time, and saw nothing of what took place previous to the explosions. Mrs. Hebden was at the time with a lady friend in another part of the boat. Mr. Hebden said:-
"I heard the explosion right under me. It did not make a very loud noise, though the ship shook once or twice. Then the ship began to lean over on its side and started to sink. At once everything was put into confusion. I rushed to the second boat deck and tried to find my wife, but I could not see her. People were shouting and many women and children cried as the ship listed over more and more. One lifeboat was filled with people, and when about six feet from the water the davits broke and it fell."
Proceeding, Mr. Hebden described how he got into a lifeboat, in which evidently the plug was out of place, and it began to fill with water. The result was that the people in the boat were thrown into the sea, and as the lifeboat turned topsy-turvy in the water, they clung to the sides. They were in a precarious position for quite a long time, fearing that they would not be able to hold on, or that the boat would sink beneath them, as it threatened to do. The experience was a terrible one. Mr. Hebden related how he saw the liner list more and more then sink bows first. It was all over in 18 minutes, and very many lives were lost.
"All around were people, some swimming in the water, others clinging to lifebelts and very feeble wreckage supports. I saw people who were past aid sink, but I never saw a trace of the murderers who brought all this awful loss of life about."



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