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YorkshireTyke
New Member


12 Posts
Posted -  24/11/2011  :  17:23
This may be obscure but I'm researching the hand knitting industry in Yorkshire in the 18thC and 19thC.

I'm wondering if anyone has come across any relevant sources? Either photos, or articles about, mentions of, mentions in parish records - absolutely anything.  If anyone has come across anything to do with hand-knitting, I'd love to know more.

 


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Julie in Norfolk
Senior Member


1632 Posts
Posted - 24/11/2011 : 17:32
Somewhere (and I can't remember where) I remember being told that the lead miners used to knit on their way to the mine. That'll be the chaps as well as the lasses. Must try to remember where I learned of this.


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wendyf
Senior Member


1439 Posts
Posted - 24/11/2011 : 18:36
The Terrible Knitters of Dent come to mind.


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Sunray10
Regular Member


557 Posts
Posted - 24/11/2011 : 22:19
Didn't the people of Wycoller used to do knitting in their homes, usually upstairs rooms on their own looms. Something like that ? 


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Julie in Norfolk
Senior Member


1632 Posts
Posted - 25/11/2011 : 05:47
www.johnhearfield.com/swale/who_did_what.htm tells of lead miners and shepherds knitting. There is a poem that says of someone knitting as they walk which was the way I had heard about. Sorry about the link, must go  back and relearn


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Julie in Norfolk
Senior Member


1632 Posts
Posted - 25/11/2011 : 05:51
just google lead mining and knitting


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 25/11/2011 : 05:58
Here's the LINK.

The mention of badgers being licenced is nothing to do with the animals. A 'Badger' was an itinerant corn dealer who was not affiliated to a trade association or guild and at one time they were made illegal. I'll post the article i wrote about them.


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Another
Traycle Mine Overseer


6250 Posts
Posted - 25/11/2011 : 07:14
Have a look at thios about the terrible knitters of Dent. Nolic

http://www.dentvillageheritagecentre.com/TerribleKnitters.htm 


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moh
Silver Surfer


6860 Posts
Posted - 25/11/2011 : 10:32
That was hand loom weaving Sunray.


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YorkshireTyke
New Member


12 Posts
Posted - 25/11/2011 : 23:36
Ah thanks for this so far. If anyone has owt else, keep it coming! The standard book is Marie Hartley and Joan Ingilby's 'Old Hand Knitters of the Dales' - they mention the lead miners' wives scurrying out of the houses "like mice" on payday, to buy more wool. I'm guessing some of this was for their own use but maybe most of it, for knitting commercially for mills.

Marie Hartley mentions sources like certain mill records for the early 19thC that she was shown in the late 1940s when researching her book, but which we can now find no trace of.  So any leads would be great. Or any references anyones' come across in journals or letters or obscure books!

Some of my dad's ancestors were lead miners/sheep farmers in Ravenstonedale, Westmorland (Stephensons). I have the accounts in the Hartley/Ingilby  book but was wondering if we could turn up something previously unpublished, or find more stuff? 

 In that book, they mention the Coates family as being well known as knitters and my grt grt grandma was a Coates from Wigglesworth. So I have a personal interest as well as a professional one, in trying to find out more!

Edited by - YorkshireTyke on 25/11/2011 23:36:51


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wendyf
Senior Member


1439 Posts
Posted - 06/12/2011 : 16:56
If you are still around Tyke...I have a book titled "The family records of Benjamin Shaw, mechanic of Dent, Dolphinholme & Preston, 1772 - 1841" edited by Alan G Crosby.
Benjamin Shaw wrote 2 volumes about his family history, which ended up in the Lancashire record office. Alan Crosby rediscovered them and has transcribed them with many notes and explanations.
 I just got it out to look for something and came across various references to hand knitting in the Dent area. Benjamin wrote about his childhood in the 1770's and how the village school existed to teach children how to knit, with reading being of secondary importance. He talks about the different items that were commonly made.



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