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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted -  14/11/2010  :  06:26
NEW VERSION TO MAKE IT EASIER FOR MEMBERS WITH SLOW CONNECTIONS TO CONNECT.

Follw this LINK for last version.


Stanley Challenger Graham




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stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk
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catgate
Senior Member


1764 Posts
Posted - 28/12/2010 : 16:14


quote:
Bodger wrote:

As an aside here in Ireland parents have to supply text books & exercise books (copy books here) , in earlier days the text books were handed down or sold on, but with progress, sylybusses ? change every year so parents still have to fork out, and the best bit is that some of the books have spaces in to write the solution, so after use they are no good unless pencil and an eraser are used,  the annual cost per annum varies but in infants about £100 per child for books, the there are folders, writing/drwg tools , uniforms, bags, school transport, etc. this more than doubles the cost, and as the child grows so do the costs, at 15 yrs. books can cost £450/500, but it is called free education !!

You have brought up a thing that has long puzzled me.

If, in the UK, the state looks upon the education of a child as a matter for which it should take the  responsibility (financial and curricular) because the state will ultimately benefit from it, then why does it not take a similar view of the rest of the total cost and decision making concerning the upbringin, feeding and clothing of children.

I know it has tinkered and interfered over the years, but only in as far as the gathering of votes was concerned.

No I am not advocating it, just questioning the logic (if there is any).


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belle
VIP Member


6502 Posts
Posted - 28/12/2010 : 18:08
and why suddenly stop short when the child shows enough ability to go on to further education?


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catgate
Senior Member


1764 Posts
Posted - 28/12/2010 : 19:27


quote:
belle wrote:
and why suddenly stop short when the child shows enough ability to go on to further education?

Exactly!

I suspect it may be that "they" imagine that the "appropriate influence" has been inculcated by that time. 


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 29/12/2010 : 06:09
Belle and Catty, I agree with both of you. I suspect that politicians see only the bald costs as presented by the stitisticians in the Treasury. Like the Forensic Service they are going to abolish, if it costs (overruns the budget) £3million a month it has to go regardless of its value to us. Many studies have been done on primary education which show clearly that money invested in it returns many times over in lower crime figures. Take any of the major cuts in funding and apply proper cost/benefit analysis and you get an entirely different result. This is not economic literacy or logic, it is kene-jerk reaction to temporary political expediency. The question is always "Can we get away with it?"

The number crunchers announce this morning that 'Tax Freedom Day' (The day when the average taxpayer has earned enough to pay the annual tax bill) advances 3 days this year to May 10th. Talk about boiling the figures down to make them 'intelligble'! Give some thought to what this ctually tells us, remember it's an average. All it tells us is that (if the figures are right and average earnings keep up) the position is slightly worse than last year.

Still enjoying Campbell on Nye Bevan. Totally objective and lays bare his faults as well as his virtues.  With the benefit of hindsight and reliable figures it also makes some informed judgements about his achievements in office. His argument against imposing charges in the NHS to support rearmament was on the grounds that the massive increase in defence spending that triggered the cuts couldn't be sustained because the materials and machine tools weren't available. History shows he was right. I've always accepted the figures that the Macmillan housing record was better than Bevan's wonderful success after the war in terms of housing units. What I hadn't realised was that Bevan's definitions of essential quality in public housing were higher than both the later Labour standards and the Tory government's. On residual value and tenant satisfaction the Bevan housing wins hands down. Campbell is just as probing about Nye's eventual melt-down and the damage it did but points out that here also he was eventually proved right. His argument was that the 'Cold War' did more economic damage than a real war could have done because it diverted money away from support for those countries that needed it most, thus opening the door to discontent, Communist influence and the growth of fundamantalism based on anger against the treatment they received at the hands of the developed countries. Bevan's mistake was that he took it as a personal affront and lashed out at those he saw as the guilty men in the Labour Party which was selfish, vindictive and entirely non-productive. As I say Campbell is totally objective about this. However after all this one thing shines through, even though he went about it the wrong way his core values and principles were sound. It makes you wonder what the consequences would have been if he hadn't gone off the rails. Fascinating stuff.


Stanley Challenger Graham




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catgate
Senior Member


1764 Posts
Posted - 29/12/2010 : 11:05


quote:
Stanley wrote:
Belle and Catty, I agree with both of you.

I was infering that if all this child care was for the benefit of the state, then may be the state should take over the responsibility for conception too. The breeding stock could be kept in special tower blocks, after completion of their politicised education, and be let out at specific times to work for the state. Then after breeding age had passed they could be exported as outsourcing fodder.


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catgate
Senior Member


1764 Posts
Posted - 29/12/2010 : 13:01
I also notice that the number of children without a computers and/or access to the internet is causing major consternation in the quangocracy.  The e-Learning Foundation, one of Tony's quangos (set up for his friend "Bill" no doubt and stuffed with left leaning heavies) is going into apoplectic overload. 

" 3M children without home broadband and PCs claims report"

"More than a million British children have no access to computer at home."

There seems to be some difference in how many parents are not providing their offspring with these bare essentials  depending on where you read the report. Never the less, now that we have a change of government it is time to raise the matter whilst we have then on the run about the books business.

So who was it that started educating children in a manner that required using home computers before all children had access to them??????and why????

We did chemistry at school using fume cupboards and  distillation equipment but we did not have them at home.

 





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Sunray10
Regular Member


557 Posts
Posted - 29/12/2010 : 14:58
Er I think it was Sir Alan Sugar Catty. I remember having one of his Amstrad computers in the 70s/80s. The cassette games took ages to load. Anyway, as Sir Alan would say "You're Fired".


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catgate
Senior Member


1764 Posts
Posted - 29/12/2010 : 16:37


quote:
Sunray10 wrote:
Er I think it was Sir Alan Sugar Catty. I remember having one of his Amstrad computers in the 70s/80s. The cassette games took ages to load. Anyway, as Sir Alan would say "You're Fired".

Oh.  Er...What was Alan Sugar??

I too had one ofd his PC 1512 DD models when they first came out in about 1986/7. Prior to that one of Mr. Sinclair's ZX81 (I think it was). One had to have a portable B&W tele. into which to plug Mr Sinclairs master pieces, and a cassette recorder to store data upon. I found out how to write prgrammes in basic on that.


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Sunray10
Regular Member


557 Posts
Posted - 29/12/2010 : 16:55
Lord Sugar founder of the Amstrad Empire. You're Fired, etc. I remember the Spectrum ZX computers with their seperate tv monitors. Every person that owned one of these thought they were the bees knees. But the Amstrads were just as good, well I think so at any rate.


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catgate
Senior Member


1764 Posts
Posted - 29/12/2010 : 18:45


quote:
Sunray10 wrote:
Lord Sugar founder of the Amstrad Empire. You're Fired, etc. I remember the Spectrum ZX computers with their seperate tv monitors. Every person that owned one of these thought they were the bees knees. But the Amstrads were just as good, well I think so at any rate.

The Amstrads were vastly superior to Mr Sinclair's offering, but that gets us no nearer to the answer to my query regarding your saying... "Er I think it was Sir Alan Sugar Catty."

Should I shake a six and have another go??


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gearce
Regular Member


941 Posts
Posted - 30/12/2010 : 04:00
My OGFB skin has been changed to White Xmas ...... This happened last year as well ...... Will someone who has the power to do so please change it back to Frosty Sky

Thank you


LANG MEY YER LUM REEK

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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 30/12/2010 : 04:56
Catty. Any child who is not computer literate is handicapped in our modern society. Having a home computer reinforces this and enhances skills. If only the affluent can afford them we inroduce a handicap based on wealth. There are far too many of those about already so anything designed to make access to computers and services open to all gets my vote.No different than having books, pens and paper in the house.

Gearce, if you want to change the default skin go to the menus and chose what you like. The Xmas one will go away shortly.


Stanley Challenger Graham




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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 30/12/2010 : 05:35
I've just heard a phrase that encapsulates the New Year quite well. A forecast that it will be 'The year of consequences'. Very true, the pigeons will come home and end all the arguments as to whether the ConDem coalition has gone too far, to fast. I'm not optimistic!

Fascinating release from the Nat Archive of an 11 page memo Harold Macmillan gave Margaret Thatcher in 1980 arguing that her monetary policis, particularly the money supply theories of the Chicago School were wrong and in danger of triggering circumstances like the 1930s. She considered his arguments, made the decision (supported by the Treasury)  that he was wrong and made her famous "The lady's not for turning" speech. As it turned out Harold was largely correct in his assessment of the effects of the policy but of course he had the benefit of being in politics right through the inter-war period. These experiences lead him to write his book 'The Middle Way' and it would be good if the current policy-makers read, learned and inwardly digested his good advice. Harold didn't have all the answers of course and made many mistakes but he was basically a decent man who didn't see confrontation and destructive economic policies as being the way forward.


Stanley Challenger Graham




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frankwilk
Senior Member


3975 Posts
Posted - 30/12/2010 : 08:40
'The year of consequences'

Is that when you have been spending what you never had, comes home to roost ??
 
I watched Milliband this morning you would think this mess had nothing to do with him, was he not part of the Goverment that caused it ??



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frankwilk
Senior Member


3975 Posts
Posted - 30/12/2010 : 08:51
What caught my attention this morning was the News that many many more people (baby boomers) will live to be 100.
Last night I visited a friend in a Geriatric Hospital it is full of people who would, only 30 or 40 years ago have now been dead. We are sleep walking into what will be one of the biggest problems to confront us all sooner rather than later. What happens to the people who are breathing, but for all intents and purpose are already dead ??.
I have no idea of the answers, but as a politico  once said " We are all in this together " 



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