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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted -  14/10/2004  :  09:57
Jack is making a lot of friends in Barlick. I don't know why, maybe it's his face markings but people on the street feel the need to stroke him. Women in particular fall for him.

As you know, I had a bad experience with Joe, the lurcher from Irlam. I was very wary about taking another feral dog on but I'm beginning to think that Jack will make it as a member of the team. He's good at coming to hand when off the lead but I'm not saying he'd take any notice if he was distracted.

He's fast and very agile and seems to have lungs as big as a bucket, I haven't heard him pant as though he's out of breath even after a hard run. As for jumping, he's like a cat. Here he is on his favourite perch. Someone asked me the other day why I don't stop him doing it. It's easier to clean the drainer twice a day!


[This topic started as Jack's blog but in Jan 2008 I had to put him down because he started attacking strange dogs.  His successor is Black Jack. a Patterdale pup, no point erasing Jack the Lurcher from history....  he was a good dog and what happened wasn't his fault.  He had too bad a start.....]


Stanley Challenger Graham




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stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk
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Tizer
VIP Member


5150 Posts
Posted - 25/06/2011 : 11:24
Penwith, the very end bit of Cornwall west of a line drawn south from Hayle, is certainly near to being an island. The line of the river runs south from the estuary at Hayle towards the south coast then back north again. The railway follows the low ground from Hayle and south to Penzance too. At the south end of the low ground are the Marazion marshes. Back in geological history, with rises in sea level, the Penwith area has been an island, but at times of lower sea level even the Scilly Isles were joined to the Cornish mainland.


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 26/06/2011 : 05:59
I often wonder what the effect on Scottish history would have been if the Great Glen had managed to separate completely. Mind you, it may still be moving apart! (Don't hold your breath)


Stanley Challenger Graham




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stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
Tizer
VIP Member


5150 Posts
Posted - 26/06/2011 : 10:47
The Mid-Atlantic Ridge runs through Iceland and the island is getting bigger as new land is formed continuously at the ridge by magma welling up from below. You can stand there with the American continental plate on one side of you and the European on the other.


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 27/06/2011 : 06:44
Tectonic Plate Theory fascinates me. I think largely because the processes are so incredibly slow when compared with our life span or even the length of time there has been human life on earth. Puts us firmly in our place!


Stanley Challenger Graham




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stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
Bradders
Senior Member


1880 Posts
Posted - 14/08/2011 : 00:02
Today I returned to Cornwall from an eventful visit to England...(Derby)

Last Thursday , poor Dexter had some sort of (unseen ) accident , and was in great discomfort (he wouldn't let anyone near his muzzle , without snarling , but then came looking for comforting cuddles .....very hang-dog and whimpering)....

I took him to my old Vet's , and after much caoxing without result , he had to have  a General Anesthetic....(dog , not Vet !)

Verdict : He'd fractured a front upper  incisor.......OUCH !

Result : Extraction , pain relief medication , one wobbly dog and a bill for £237.47. !.......OUCH ! 

....but Dexter did get a full clean and polish , and is now VERY Proud of his Gleaming Smile .

....even if he does look a bit like Terry Thomas..eh ! 


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 14/08/2011 : 06:56
Bloddy Hell Brad!! Commiserations to both of you! Poor lad, I wonder how he did it? I've never seen a dog break a tooth before, must have been something violent.

Black Jack is just four years old (Aug 7 2007 birthdate) and is now at that nice stage where common sense has kicked in and routine is embedded. His attention demands are synchronised to my working day, half an hour at morning walk (any minute now!), 11-12 for Letcliffe. 15:40 to about 16:39 teatime and the rest of the day no demands at all except for the occasional request for evidence I know he is there. Very civilised and easy to live with. Even when quiet, he is focussed 100% on me and any diversion from routine triggers off interaction. Smart Kiddy! (I shall have a word with him about care of his teeth!)


Stanley Challenger Graham




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Another
Traycle Mine Overseer


6250 Posts
Posted - 14/08/2011 : 07:40
That's tough Bradders. 

I'm disgusteed at the way in which the insurance companies and vets seem to be in league over fees. £237 for less that an hours work is an outrage - but we have to pay it.

A frind of Cath's son recently ran into a small deer on his way to work in Skipton. He contacted the police and reported it and asked them to send out a vet as the animal was in great discomfort. Whilst waiting for the vet the deer died in his arms so he left the body at the side of the road and carried on to work. 

Within a week the vet had got his details from the police and sent him a bill for the call out fee and disposal of the body!!  Nolic 


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Tizer
VIP Member


5150 Posts
Posted - 14/08/2011 : 11:12
quote:
Another wrote:
£237 for less that an hours work is an outrage - but we have to pay it.
I can understand why you feel that Nolic but I suppose the vet would say it's not simply £237 for his labour, it's also all the high costs of staff, veterinary drugs, sophisticated equipment,  and the like. Some of the kit that vets and doctors use these days is phenomenally expensive.


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Another
Traycle Mine Overseer


6250 Posts
Posted - 14/08/2011 : 12:02
Tize, how much would it cost for a human to have an incisor removed ? I paid £15 per month on my dental plan and such work would have been free. I have to pay  + £16 month insurance for Misty as she has a shoulder problem and has a propensity to go for cats- hence potetial for legal costs.  Nolic 


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Tizer
VIP Member


5150 Posts
Posted - 14/08/2011 : 16:35
Nolic, my sister-in-law has just had the dentist remove a bit of outgrown skin from inside her cheek that had been getting caught between her teeth. A very simple, quick job - but cost her £120. I'm not defending vets, but just wondering what might be involved in the costing. I'm sure vets can charge high prices because we all love our pets so much and perhaps there are fewer vets than doctors and dentists, so greater demand for their services?


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Bradders
Senior Member


1880 Posts
Posted - 15/08/2011 : 00:51
Sorry folks , I've been telling fibs ! ......I've just had a look at the bill again........ (at the time I just wanted to get Dexter home  , and numbers were not really registering .....they were just BIG )

The actual amount was ONLY £223.74.    ! 

....but here's how it was made up :

Consultation                                         29.41

Hospitalise dog 0-9 kg                       16.04

metacam inj (5mg/ml) x jul                   9.67

op gen anaethetic dog  10-24 kg       88.82

op dentistry dog minor                         67.94

metacam oral susp  x 10ml                11.86

 

Goods                                                   186.46

VAT                                                           37.28

Total                                                     £223.74 

 

The Vet's bill is bad enough  , but I'm even more unhappy that I have had to fund the government the thick end of  Forty Quid on top  !

(next time Dave comes to St Endellion...3 miles away from here....he'd better not meet Dexter and me on the beach.....Words will be had !) 

   

 


BRADDERS BLUESINGER Go to Top of Page
Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 15/08/2011 : 07:19
Small animal practice is a goldmine for vets. I suppose they have all sorts of costs, insurance will be a biggie. But look at the cars they are driving round in, not many bangers!

Fifty years ago a farmer in Thronton was driving his cattle in for milking and one of the cars he held up was the Skipton vet. In conversation the farmer pointed to one beast and said what do you think about that one? The vet said it looked poorly. At the end of the month the farmer got a bill for 5 guineas 'To Professional Consultation'. He never paid it! Nothing new under the sun. In about 1970 John Clarke charged me 10guineas for meding Fly's broken leg and that included a fortnight in the Vet School at Edinburgh University, an operation to put a pin in and another at Colne to take it out. The dog was OK afterwards. Those were the days!


Stanley Challenger Graham




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stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
wendyf
Senior Member


1439 Posts
Posted - 15/08/2011 : 08:11
I'm not looking forward to getting the bill for Tinky's amputation (apologies for bringing a cat into Jack's topic!). I already have a £250bill  for a couple of visits from the vet to treat one of the ponies.
Tinky is doing extremely well on three legs, back to the vets for a check up today.


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 16/08/2011 : 06:58
Wendy, Jack has no aversion to cats. He just treats them with respect. The local cats know this and are quite happy when he walks past within striking distance, they just ignore him. Glad Tinky is progressing, she'll be OK. Cats are very reilient.


Stanley Challenger Graham




Barlick View
stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 22/11/2011 : 07:32
How's Tinky doing? I thought about her when a kitten trotted up to Jack near the Dog pub and reckoned to bat his muzzle with a front paw. Jack never budged but just looked on mystified. He hasn't quite worked out what cats are yet but displays no aggression. It happened yesterday as well.

What struck me this morning is how complicated dog's perception of the world is. Bear with me. Jack will always follow me into the back yard, even if he is hard and fast asleep. I get my milk in six pint bottles and empty one in about  six days. This is usually first thing in the morning when he is asleep in my rocking chair waiting for me to finish the site and get ready for the first walk of the day. Now here's the interesting bit. He is triggered into activity by me up-ending the milk bottle over my coffee. As soon as he sees me do that he knows I am going to wash it out and put it in the brown wheelie bin in the yard. He is off the chair and behind me before I've finished pouring the milk! It never fails to amaze me how he reads my movements so accurately as to know that a trip into the yard is imminent.

Bottom line is that they study us so closely and our body language is crystal clear to them. Their intelligence may be different than ours but it is equally complicated and perhaps much more accurate.


Stanley Challenger Graham




Barlick View
stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
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