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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted -  22/06/2007  :  10:00
WE ARE WHAT WE EAT 2007

 I have shifted the intro to the body of the topic.


Stanley Challenger Graham




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stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk
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belle
VIP Member


6502 Posts
Posted - 23/06/2007 : 08:37
With you all thw way on this one, Stanley.


Life is what you make itGo to Top of Page
Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 23/06/2007 : 17:38
Thanks for commenting Belle.....


Stanley Challenger Graham




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stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
Invernahaille
Regular Member


669 Posts
Posted - 24/06/2007 : 22:17
Nice piece Stanley. Dr Magnus Pike (he of the flailing arms) worked with Jack Drummond during the war years. He became well known in a TV series in the seventies with Dr Miriam Stoppard.


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 25/06/2007 : 06:39
Drummond's original book is well worth seeking out, it's a gem and full of interesting facts, historical and current.  The sad fact is that the amount of malnourishment in our society is higher today than it has ever been, not due to shortage of food but because of deterioration in quality and intentional or unintentional additives.  I know I bang on about this but it all seems so obvious.......  We have lost touch with food, people know nothing about where it comes from.  I'm eating some beef this week from a Dexter heifer reared on grass in Barlick.  Lovely little cattle.  I enjoyed it that much I am going down to the butchers tomorrow to pick out the cuts from another beast from the same farm.  Stuart will bone and roll them and keep them in his freezer for me.  That's how much I care about what I eat.


Stanley Challenger Graham




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stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
Invernahaille
Regular Member


669 Posts
Posted - 25/06/2007 : 12:10
I know what you mean Stanley. Before I left the UK the bacon I bought was more water than bacon.


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 26/06/2007 : 07:03
Sad thing is that if you put proper bacon in the supermarket nobody would buy it, too expensive and full of fat........


Stanley Challenger Graham




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stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
Invernahaille
Regular Member


669 Posts
Posted - 26/06/2007 : 15:21

Same here Stan. The bacon is nearly all fat with a couple of streaks of meat through it. Hardly surprizing the Americans have obesity problems. I used to love the Danish shoulder bacon you bought at the local shops. Sliced off the roll in front of you so that you knew what you were getting, and cut to your desired thickness. Mowbrays (who owned Ellenrod Farm) used to sell their eggs and bacon to the local corner shops. (My brother was a farm boy for them, and I would drink milk staright from the udder). Really fresh straight from the farm taste, to the shopkeepers. These days their are so many health and hygiene regulations, I dont know how we survived all the scares.

Halcyon days.




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Callunna
Revolving Grey Blob


3044 Posts
Posted - 26/06/2007 : 16:54
"if you put proper bacon in the supermarket nobody would buy it, too expensive and full of fat"


I think you're right there, but when the penny drops that paying for fat and water isn't an economical thing to do, then maybe more people would go for the good stuff (and this from a veggie...)


We've already discussed buying meat from local butchers, but have I mentioned the farm shop at the Tebay Service Station on the M6? A surprising location but a delight to wander around.


E bought some bacon there and swears it's the only time she's ever cooked bacon and found it increased in size. That's value for money in anyone's book. No water, no excess fat, just good, organic, tasty bacon, probably how it used to taste in th'owden days (though I wouldn't know myself, obviously).
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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 26/06/2007 : 19:04
Stuart Brown sells good home cured bacon.  I got some Dexter beef off him last Friday, reared in Barlick and wonderful stuff.  It was so good I went down there this morning and bought half a cow.....  If you like beef and you've never tried it get in there, he has another carcass this week. 


Stanley Challenger Graham




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stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
karlelden
Regular Member


78 Posts
Posted - 27/06/2007 : 03:01

Stanley said: "I don’t trust anyone who is making profit from growing food or processing it for the mass market." 

Right-O!

But I believe that "profit motive" will unfortunately continue to rule (and kill) us all. For almost all people in a business of some kind, the more cheaply they can produce and sell more things regardless of consequences, the better they like it.

Love of money and all that...




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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 27/06/2007 : 05:56
Course it will but.....  If we stop buying it they stop making money.  It's down to the customers to get educated.


Stanley Challenger Graham




Barlick View
stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
Invernahaille
Regular Member


669 Posts
Posted - 27/06/2007 : 13:43
Power to the people.


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 27/06/2007 : 17:34
Quite.  That's the only thing that will reverse the worst effects of processed food.


Stanley Challenger Graham




Barlick View
stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 22/03/2008 : 07:54
Two things have triggered me off to bring this one back up.  I've just read a book; 'Swindled' by Bee Wilson which looks at food adulteration and additives from the Ind Revolution to the present day.  A good read and very informative.

The other is a news item yesterday about a person from Somali who is in hospital in Bradford with a very drug-resistant form of Tuberculosis.  This brings to mind and American friend of mine who is a GP and found that foreign workers doing low paid jobs in the local turkey packing plant had TB.  There was no health check in place for the casual workers.

It makes me wonder, who is responsible for health checks on workers who come into contact with food?  Many of these are contract workers and immigrants working on low wages.  Are they checked to see if they are carrying any diseases?

I am not attacking the immigrants and sympathise with anyone who is ill.  My target is the owners of the food processing plants or kitchens where humans come into contact with food.  It is their responsibility to make sure that their workers are in good health.  They should all be screened, no matter what their origin or job status, to make sure they are not a danger to the consumer.


Stanley Challenger Graham




Barlick View
stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
mporter
Regular Member


978 Posts
Posted - 22/03/2008 : 23:16
Why are they not tested for these illnesses BEFORE they enter the UK, to migrate to Australia we were tested for everything under the sun.  We had chest xrays, blood tests, urine tests and we were all examinied by a doctor in Preston.  They even checked between our fingers and toes for signs of needles incase we were drug addicts.


Margaret Porter
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