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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted -  14/11/2010  :  06:26
NEW VERSION TO MAKE IT EASIER FOR MEMBERS WITH SLOW CONNECTIONS TO CONNECT.

Follw this LINK for last version.


Stanley Challenger Graham




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stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk
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Bodger
Regular Member


892 Posts
Posted - 15/09/2011 : 08:16
I know we are not on recycling here but i never throw anything away before i strip all nuts , bolts, screws etc. i have boxes ranging from 30,mm to 4mm,  bsw& af, plus a box of assorted, these are from old bikes, cars, toys etc, the neighbours use me when the local hardware fails to deliver, The first job my children were taught, like me , how to sraighten nails , there were'nt many new ones around in the 1940s


"You can only make as well as you can measure"
                           Joseph Whitworth
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Tizer
VIP Member


5150 Posts
Posted - 15/09/2011 : 09:52
I've got a box full of empty jam jars, and lots of jars full of nails, screws etc. My father-in-law goes a step further - he has so many jars of screws etc on shelves that he also keeps them under shelves. He fastens the jar lid to the underside of the shelf above so that he can screw the jar on and off the lid with one hand.


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Tardis
Regular Member


453 Posts
Posted - 15/09/2011 : 14:49
The UK government is apparently taking the ECB to court because  of a restrictive practice that it appears the Eurozone wants to bring in:

The Treasury is unhappy with an ECB move to limit the kind of euro-denominated products that can pass through UK clearing houses, suspecting it’s a bid to shift financial activity from London to Paris/Berlin


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handlamp
Senior Member


1100 Posts
Posted - 15/09/2011 : 15:43
The Treasury is very likely right, if Adolf is allowed any respite from his shovelling he must be pleased at the trouble his countrymen are taking to make his dreams come true, but disappointed at their failure to bring the  `defulters' into line as he would certainly have done.


TedGo to Top of Page
Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 16/09/2011 : 05:59
Bodge and Tiz, I pick nuts and bolts up if I see them in the street. Funny how pewople consider things to be litter but if asked to make one wouldn't have a clue. I have the equivalent of your dad's jars and every now and again it provides just what I was looking for.

Ted, quite, and one of the best reasons for having the EU, I would rather have them cooperating than fighting!

 From the HeraldScotland: " Workers were hopeful and optimistic Philip Hill, 45, Charles Bresnan, 62, David Powell, 50, and Garry Jenkins, 39, would be freed alive from Gleision Colliery in Pontardawe after they were trapped by rising water. See this LINK for the four miners. The price of coal. This is a small independent drift mine working a 30" seam. I hope they get them out... Looks as though they may have broken into old workings full of water which in days gone by would be de-watered by neighbouring mines.


Stanley Challenger Graham




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stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
Tizer
VIP Member


5150 Posts
Posted - 16/09/2011 : 10:40
Late news this morning...Sadly they've found one body in the mine, but they are still hopeful for the others. The BBC said they were pumping in oxygen...I hope they mean air, I would have thought pure oxygen was dangerous in a coal mine (many substances, let alone coal, spontaneously ignite in oxygen).

Shocking news about the one-third of doctors in Britain who are foreigners...many of them have poor English. And worst of all, EU regulations prevent us from making those from EU countries learn English.

Ted, Germany seems to do something right. They still manufacture a lot of their own goods. How do they manage it and we don't?


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Tardis
Regular Member


453 Posts
Posted - 16/09/2011 : 10:50


quote:
Tizer wrote:
Shocking news about the one-third of doctors in Britain who are foreigners...many of them have poor English. And worst of all, EU regulations prevent us from making those from EU countries learn English.


The greater shock to me, is that our education system is not geared up to address this obvious anomaly.

There is room for approx 36 more students to complete their medical studies, for every 64 that do complete at UK institutions.

Why import something that we know the UK can already produce. Are those institutions saying that the UK education standards are too poor, or the restrictive practice ensures that salaries are always high?

The worst part, is that we then use these doctors from elsewhere so that the UK can provide "aid" to other countries.


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Bruff
Regular Member


479 Posts
Posted - 16/09/2011 : 13:33
Also education related, a survey today suggests almost half of parents would welcome the return of the cane in schools.  I suspect many of these assume it's not their little angel(s) that'll feel the rod but nevertheless I always find this view interesting.  I would like to ask these 50% if they would welcome the caning of dogs and other beasts for trangressions.  There's many an unruly dog I'd like to grab by the scruff and whip with a cane.  No doubt some of these parents would welcome both the caning of children and the whipping of dogs, but again I suspect many would view the whipping of a dog as a less than edifying spectacle whilst out on the school run.

 
That's a bit flippant I know but for the life of me, if I caned an adult I'd be in right trouble..... and they're as big as me.  Why on earth would anyone want to beat a child with a stick?  They must be poorly.

 
Just for clarity, I don't understand what that statistic on medical students is illustrating?  Is it something to do with the ratio of UK to foreign national medical students?  And sorry, I don't understand the aid issue either ( I am particularly dopey Fridays).  Is it about our Drs going to work for Medecines Sans Frontieres or some such?  Well, we can't stop them doing that and personally I find something rather life affirming in those medics who decide stopping some person's life dripping out of their backside is worth more than any name plate for the Ferrari at the Private Clinic.

 
Richard Broughton 



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Tardis
Regular Member


453 Posts
Posted - 16/09/2011 : 15:14


quote:
Bruff wrote:
Just for clarity, I don't understand what that statistic on medical students is illustrating?  Is it something to do with the ratio of UK to foreign national medical students?  And sorry, I don't understand the aid issue either ( I am particularly dopey Fridays).  Is it about our Drs going to work for Medecines Sans Frontieres or some such?  Well, we can't stop them doing that and personally I find something rather life affirming in those medics who decide stopping some person's life dripping out of their backside is worth more than any name plate for the Ferrari at the Private Clinic.

 
Richard Broughton 

The statistic may demonstrate a failing in the UK education system, but more dramatically goes to prove that the UK is able to pull well trained and very expensive resources from other countries, who might well actually need those resources themselves.

I have no desire to denigrate those who give up their time, one of brothers-in-law has done much work for the Optical Charity, and another has done much voluntary work on children with disfigured facial features, and I welcome their ability to do so in their own time. I know that they both got much personal satisfaction from their volunteering.

The greater issue is, that without these resources taken from other countries there wouldn't be sufficient cover within the NHS to actually allow these doctors to indulge in this kind of activity because the public furore would be one of "why are you helping them, and not providing the service here?".

On top of which; it may be possible that the doctors removed from these overseas states would actually be present in these countries, where the doctors go freely to volunteer, and thus enable the other country to more ably look after its own people.

"give a man a fish, and he will feed himself for a day,
give a man the means to catch the fish and he will feed himself,
give a man the training to make the equipment that will enable him to catch the fish from local sources and he will have skills to pass on, won't need expensive materials from donor countries, and be able to feed himself
"


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handlamp
Senior Member


1100 Posts
Posted - 16/09/2011 : 15:53
Tiz, Germany has always had an affinity with us as we're both from the same aryan stock. They have generally retained the efficiency mentality whilst ours has been somewhat watered down. Our idea that manufacturing could be allowed to slide in the 70/80's was our big mistake - that's the political class quick fix again, of course. 


TedGo to Top of Page
Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 17/09/2011 : 06:03
Gersion colliery. Now clear that all four were killed on Thursday morning when there was an inrush, most likely from abandoned workings. My heart goes out to the families and the community. Interesting that the radio and TV commentators immediately questioned Health and Safety. They don't realise that the UK, largely through union pressure, has always led the world in Mine Regulation and still does. The last EU revision was based on our regs and the H&S staff at Bootle in the Mines Inspectorate were heavily involved. I went down the drift into the Arley Seam at the Cliviger Coal Company in 1982 and the regs were just as strict as in a large mine.

Coal getting will always be dangerous, remember that next Thursday is the 77th anniversary of the Gresford  disaster, 256 miners killed, 200 widows, 800 fatherless children and 254 of the bodies are still down there.

By the way, the Gersion drift was mining anthracite, now running at an all-time high of £200 per ton at the pit head. This was the incentive. Only five workers and I suspect it was a private mine.

Ted and Tiz, another factor is that Germany has, since the early twentieth century, always held engineers and manufacturing industry in high regard. During the Thatcher era these fields of endeavour were held in contempt. Smokestack industry was seen as dirty and redundant.  What a mistake.....


Stanley Challenger Graham




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stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
Tardis
Regular Member


453 Posts
Posted - 17/09/2011 : 11:04
Germany retained high skilled, high valued manufacturing industries. They always ensured that the products they produced had a high reputation, and by keeping production limited made sure that these sought after products reached the highest price which then gave money for re-investment to keep the cycle going.

It has always ensured that the country's educational resources produce the people that are needed for these types of industry.

In the UK, we followed a course of the lowest common denominator, we made tat that nobody...not even people in the UK would buy because some people thought it was better to have some jobs rather than face the prospect of wholesale closures, then we made it far more expensive to actually make these goods here. Self fulfilling legacy left to the banks to pull the rugs. If there is no profit, there is no money left over for re-investment, and if industry does not innovatate then it will be overtaken by it's competition and die.

All the good niche manufacturing (Hornby etc) have only survived bacause they have off shored their operations after many "administrations", and they were encouraged to do so.

Our political masters followed a service sector economy, but failed to address this within the educational establishments. They failed to recognise that people would still want brickies, plasterers, electricians and plumbers, and once upon a time these careers were alternatives to "going to University". Except some Universities are the old polys and establishments of higher education where you could get HND's

After the last 13 years, I think the analogy of building your house upon the sand is apt. The sand has moved, the building has gone and now the country needs to recognise that the economy needs to be rebalanced. Meanwhile, the public finances need to also rebalance themselves or put up tax rates to keep the revenues as near the same as possible. Tax rises will be anti-competitive.


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Tizer
VIP Member


5150 Posts
Posted - 17/09/2011 : 11:38
Germany established `technical schools' in the 1800s and got well ahead of Britain in this form of education. When Britain began to see Germany as a possible aggressor rather than ally it came as a shock to find they were so much better at engineering and it was difficult to catch up - perhaps we never caught up.


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 18/09/2011 : 05:08
Not quite as black and white as that Michael. Still innovation and world class manufacturing in the UK but very bad at advertising itself.

 Quite right Tiz and one of the areas where they excelled was in chemical industries. It was the realisation that IG Farben in Germany and Du Pont in America were so dominant that led to the amalgamations that eventually resulted in the formation of ICI in 1926. The Kahki dye for the British Army's uniforms in 1914 was a German product and the K series fuses used by Vickers and other armament companies right through the war were a Krupps patent and after the war we had to pay a fee for using them!


Stanley Challenger Graham




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stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
Tardis
Regular Member


453 Posts
Posted - 19/09/2011 : 10:42
You only need to look at the FTSE, once a company reaches a certain size it appears to be snapped up by a foreign company.

The UK may be very good at start ups but it isn't very good at actually holding on to them.

It must be remembered that a company who HQ's abroad does not then pay the taxation to the Treasury that it once did.


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