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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted -  14/11/2010  :  06:37
New topic to make loading easier for slow connections.

Steeplejacks corner part four

Click on this link for the last section of the topic.


Stanley Challenger Graham




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stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk
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Tizer
VIP Member


5150 Posts
Posted - 23/07/2011 : 12:10
Thanks for that Stanley. You say "..any water entrained with the steam collected in the bottom from where it was piped away through a standard steam trap." I suppose there could have been a hole at the bottom of the sphere but it would have been hidden by the way it's sitting on the ground, and more light would have been needed to see inside.


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 23/07/2011 : 17:03
There will be one there, 3/4" BSP I should think.


Stanley Challenger Graham




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Invernahaille
Regular Member


669 Posts
Posted - 23/07/2011 : 20:35
No problem Stanley, Steam trap, Condensator Trap. Steam Seperator, Same difference to me.
There used to be several of these devices although smaller throughout a ships steamlines.

Edited by - Invernahaille on 23/07/2011 8:38:08 PM


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 24/07/2011 : 06:02
Thanks for that Robert, I didn't want to sound as though I was arguing!  Did you ever come across the Hopkinson condensate recovery system in your travels. There was one at Bancroft but it hadn't been used for years. Mounted above boiler level, it collected condensate from the heating system and had a big vessel that held about ten gallons. When the level reached a float inside it it shut the inlet and opened the vessel to boiler pressure and the collected water drained by gravity into the boiler. I always thought it was a wonderful system but there must have been some flaw in the design because it hadn't been connected for years.


Stanley Challenger Graham




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Invernahaille
Regular Member


669 Posts
Posted - 24/07/2011 : 17:51
Stanley,
             I didnt take it that way. You do have a lot of input on these matters through your mill engine experiences. Yes I have seen them, on ships I think the problem with them is that they collected debris which sank to the bottom of the vessel, thus feeding the debris contaminants into the boiler. On ships the condensate was fed to a double bottom tank and was pumped up to the boiler feed system by a steam donkey pump.


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James Powell
New Member


22 Posts
Posted - 24/07/2011 : 19:22
Ours go: Sampson Loop-Steam Trap-Drains System- Aux. Drains Tank-ME Condenser.  Aux Drains is nitrated before pumping to Condenser, and is about once daily.  (back before it all rusted into nothing)

James


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Invernahaille
Regular Member


669 Posts
Posted - 24/07/2011 : 20:45
We could be diverting from this threads main topic of steeplejacking, I do understand the connection "no boilers no stacks" I hope we havnt monopoloised the jackies here. LOL.


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Bradders
Senior Member


1880 Posts
Posted - 24/07/2011 : 22:20
You'd know if you had .....!


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Invernahaille
Regular Member


669 Posts
Posted - 25/07/2011 : 00:41
LOL


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 25/07/2011 : 06:41
The topic has always covered associated matters like demolition and mechanical matters. I shouldn't lose any sleep. The steeplejck input isn't as big as it was but that's perfectly normal. Don't worry! Bob will pop up with an intriguing pic for us to comment on before long and Youg Tom is always watching us.


Stanley Challenger Graham




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Tizer
VIP Member


5150 Posts
Posted - 25/07/2011 : 16:58
I put the Coldharbour photo on this thread for want of somewhere to post the question. I knew I would get answers here!


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 26/07/2011 : 05:58
Weird lot on SC...... It's always been an 'alternative' topic.


Stanley Challenger Graham




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Asquith
New Member


23 Posts
Posted - 30/07/2011 : 20:17
The thing at Coldharbour that looks like a Victorian SpaceHopper is a Hotchkiss Circulator.

I spotted one above a Lancashire boiler at the excellent Abbey Pumping Station in Leicester, and volunteer Fred Crammond told me what it was.

All is revealed in this article (if the link works):-

http://www.alwynvintcent.co.za/AVtech/AVtech_files/Page523.htm


Edited by - Asquith on 30/07/2011 20:25:09


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 31/07/2011 : 06:36
You're right Askers and I was wrong. (I thought it was a bit small for a seperator). Never worked with one and never found the need, I suspect they would go out of use as better feed water treatment became available post WW2. There are far easier ways of looking after water quality, and more effective as well because they address the chemical action of the dissolved solids. All this would do is remove insoluble sediment and scum and perhaps have a marginal effect on circulation in the boiler.

The early pioneers used to agonise about water circulation, this was why they soon changed the flue system in Cornish boilers to take the flame directly from the downtake under the boiler to the front and then into the side flues.  Previous to that the flame went direct into the side flues from the downtake and then under the boiler to the flue which meant the bottom of the boiler was exposed to a hotter gas flow. The improved system of flues had another benefit, if a mid-feather was made in the downtake to keep the two streams of gas separate, any explosions when they met were in the sole flue where they could do no damage, far stronger than the side walls. That's why the downtake on a boiler like Ellenroad has loose cast iron lids to allow any shock to escape, a lot of people called the downtake the 'explosion box'. If you want to look at the genesis of the new flue arrangements seek out William Pole. 'Treatise on the Cornish Pumping Engine', 1844. A fascinating and authorative account of the early engines and the efforts to make them more efficient.


Stanley Challenger Graham




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stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
Tizer
VIP Member


5150 Posts
Posted - 31/07/2011 : 17:04
Thanks for that clarification Asquith, and for the informative link with its entertaining advertisements too. I like the `All British' Siderosthen ad - very patriotic! (I seem to recall sideros is Latin or Greek for iron.)


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