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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted -  21/12/2004  :  15:37
Here's a mystery for you. There isn't an answer yet because I don't know what it is. Here are two pics:


It's some sort of a gauge, made by A G Parker of 69 Icknield Street, Birmingham and on the front is engraved what I believe is the owner's name; Captain J H Square of Kingsbridge. I've put one or two enquiries out and am waiting to hear from them. I think it might be something to do with Guns because I have an idea that A G Parker was one of the founders of Parker-Hale, a company that specialised in gun sights and accessories. Has anyone ever seen anything like it?


Stanley Challenger Graham




Barlick View
stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk
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catgate
Senior Member


1764 Posts
Posted - 05/12/2011 : 22:53


quote:
Bodger wrote:
http://www.google.ie/search?q=%22Roy%20Castle%22%20in%20the%20box&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&aq=t&rls=org.mozilla:en-GB:official&client=firefox-a&source=hp&channel=np

Wonderful, isn't it?

I first saw this at Bradford Alhambra in the 40s. Jimmy James was much funnier than his son, even though they used the same script.


Every silver lining has a cloud.


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Bradders
Senior Member


1880 Posts
Posted - 05/12/2011 : 22:55
Brilliant routine Bodge ....done by a few , but Roy Castle was a real trooper ....

Thanks for the reminder....  !
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VGcRynUHOt0


BRADDERS BLUESINGER Go to Top of Page
Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 06/12/2011 : 05:14
Wendy got there first and of course bradders has it exactly.



Here's the interior, full set of springs, scale rules and original tools. Beautiful mahogany box, all the slots in the heads of the brass screws are in line. Superb caftsmanship before you even get to the indicator. Thing that strikes me is that if this was in an auction it would be worth happen £150. Reckon up what it would cost to make the box alone today. I used this and its mate regularly on Bancroft engine.

 More? Plenty left in the museum which is my house!


Stanley Challenger Graham




Barlick View
stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 10/12/2011 : 06:29


 

 


Stanley Challenger Graham




Barlick View
stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
Bradders
Senior Member


1880 Posts
Posted - 10/12/2011 : 10:58
Road lamps ?


BRADDERS BLUESINGER Go to Top of Page
panbiker
Senior Member


2300 Posts
Posted - 10/12/2011 : 11:13
Is the top one a carbide lamp for a bike or car. I would agree with Brad on the bottom one, road works lamp.


Ian Go to Top of Page
belle
VIP Member


6502 Posts
Posted - 10/12/2011 : 11:38
carriage lamp? Can't see how the bottom pic is a lamp unless it has a naked flame..looks more like a steamer of some sort to me.


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Tizer
VIP Member


5150 Posts
Posted - 10/12/2011 : 11:57
I'll back Bradders and Panny with carbide lamp for a road vehicle and road lamp for marking out road works.


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 11/12/2011 : 06:09
Brass lamp is a caver's acetylene lamp with reserve bowl of carbide. All it needs is a fresh charge of water. Flint and steel mounted in bowl for re-lighting. I still have a tin of carbide....  Used it on my hat for investigating Ellenroad tunnels 30 years ago.

Cast iron artefact isn't a road lamp. Belle, it should have a rope wick.


Stanley Challenger Graham




Barlick View
stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 11/12/2011 : 06:17


Here's a Wells No 180 oil road flare. The lamp I posted is a Wells No 16 stink lamp. So called becuase it was used in confined spaces and oil fired flame was very sooty and smelly. It's sold cast iron and described as 'unbreakable combination lamp'. It's a very clever design....

 

Here's the reason why it is described as 'combination'. The handle unfolds and it could be hung from a projection. Clever stuff eh?

More?


Stanley Challenger Graham




Barlick View
stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
catgate
Senior Member


1764 Posts
Posted - 11/12/2011 : 09:42
I used to know a girl who wore unbreakable combinations.


Every silver lining has a cloud.


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 14/12/2011 : 07:39


Here's a puzzle for you. (Non technical!)  It's made of lead and quite heavy.


Stanley Challenger Graham




Barlick View
stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
catgate
Senior Member


1764 Posts
Posted - 14/12/2011 : 09:09
It's a flag carriers belt supported pole socket.


Every silver lining has a cloud.


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belle
VIP Member


6502 Posts
Posted - 14/12/2011 : 09:23
why the side slit?


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catgate
Senior Member


1764 Posts
Posted - 14/12/2011 : 19:51


quote:
belle wrote:
why the side slit?

It's to prevent hydraulic build up when cornering at high speed.


Every silver lining has a cloud.


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