Visit the historic Lancashire Textile Project with over 500 photos and 190 taped interviews|2|0
Go to Page
  First Page  Previous Page    19  20  21  [22]  23  24   Next Page  Last Page
Author Previous Topic Topic Next Topic  
Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted -  14/11/2010  :  06:41
New version to make loading easier'

Old topic is HERE


Stanley Challenger Graham




Barlick View
stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk
Replies
Author
Go to Page
  First Page  Previous Page    19  20  21  [22]  23  24   Next Page  Last Page
 
tripps
Senior Member


1404 Posts
Posted - 11/07/2011 : 12:11
Sorry - should have said it means bad tempered or in a bad mood.  I think we have justs shown it is a N. of England word.


Go to Top of Page
Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 12/07/2011 : 05:34
Never heard 'powslap'. My mother also used "You're worse than dirtdown" and my dad's version of that (Aussie) was "Worse than the flies". Dirtdown is of course the cotton 'dawn' (down)  that flew about in the mills.


Stanley Challenger Graham




Barlick View
stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
Another
Traycle Mine Overseer


6250 Posts
Posted - 12/07/2011 : 19:53
Dan's just getting ready to go out then went back upstairs to put some "yacum" on his hair. This was an expression by dad used for Brylcreme or hair grease and one that stuck with me and Dan's now picked up.

One this just one of my dad's odd words or has anyone else come across it? Nolic 


" I'm a self made man who worships his creator" Go to Top of Page
panbiker
Senior Member


2300 Posts
Posted - 12/07/2011 : 22:12
Familiar to me also Nolic. Dad used it as did my brother and myself.


Ian Go to Top of Page
Bradders
Senior Member


1880 Posts
Posted - 12/07/2011 : 23:21
Well here we go again, folks....All those memories of what we used to daube on our otherwise clean hair ....Brilliant !

...or should I say Brilliantine ?

There is also plenty of room for discussion about  the art of the Anti-Macasa  , and ......

Sylverkrine (how do you spell it?) springs  to mind too.

The Yanks call them  "Hair Products " now ....haha.


BRADDERS BLUESINGER Go to Top of Page
belle
VIP Member


6502 Posts
Posted - 12/07/2011 : 23:58
Linco beer shampoo...i was just discussing it with my hairdresser the other day, she said some of her older clients still use it!


Life is what you make itGo to Top of Page
Bradders
Senior Member


1880 Posts
Posted - 13/07/2011 : 00:55
Belle ...Honestly , what are you like?

There's me wanting to further a serious  discussion about Greasy Hair, and what happens ?......

It's all sham-bloody-poo from now on !...Ha X


BRADDERS BLUESINGER Go to Top of Page
Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 13/07/2011 : 04:53
'Yacum' or however we spell it. Used for evrything that's pasty and can be smeared on. I think I've used it all my life. Certainly common usage in Barlick.

Here's one for the oldies. "What we want is bigger and better bottles of Brylcreem to bash on the bald bonces of the boys" Remember the Charlie Chester Show?


Stanley Challenger Graham




Barlick View
stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
tripps
Senior Member


1404 Posts
Posted - 14/07/2011 : 11:10
"Never heard 'powslap'"   Well it looks they have in Boston Massachusets!
Try this link.  Interesting site.
pow = haircut
pow slap = a short sharp blow given to the back of the neck of someone who has just had a pow.

Nowt = nought (pronounced nowt) = nothing.
However 'naughty' is pronounced nowty (and meaning angry or ratty).

I've never heard of  'yacum' though.  Any ideas on the derivation?





Go to Top of Page
Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 15/07/2011 : 05:45
'Pow' makes sense, comes from poll? I wouldn't have spelt yacum like that, but that's no criticism because I've no better ideas. One of the synonyms for ointment is 'jack'. I think we've all come across Fiery Jack. 'J' is very often pronounced as 'Y'. Are we looking at a derivation or forerunner of 'jack'?


Stanley Challenger Graham




Barlick View
stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
belle
VIP Member


6502 Posts
Posted - 15/07/2011 : 17:25
I'm enjoying trawling through the 1911 census for Barrowford, some wonderfull names, which I wish I'd written down..Starkey Clark I think was one of them, but what I loved most of all is that people filled in this census themselves...one poor guy obviously had no time at all for this sort of thing, he wrote down the name section (where the household names are meant to be listed under each other) in pencil "Cotton weaver, working, live by myself, borne ear". and that was all there was on his form! Love it!


Life is what you make itGo to Top of Page
Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 16/07/2011 : 05:38
Belle, those are the snippets that give a genuine insight into society, not the lists of Kings and Prime Ministers. The whole reason behind the LTP!

There's been something very small nattering me lately. The latest Loreal advertisement is for something they call 'Age Re-perfect'. My problem is that they are pronouncing it like an adjective with the stress on the first syllable  when surely they are using it as a verb, 'To Perfect again' in which case accepted usage is to put the stress on the second syllable. I've been trying to recall other words where the stress changes the meaning but can't think of any. Perhaps I should get out more......


Stanley Challenger Graham




Barlick View
stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
Cathy
Senior Member


4249 Posts
Posted - 16/07/2011 : 12:05
Stanley I doubt that these type of companies think along those lines in their advertising.  I think one of their previous products was re-juvenate, or something close to that.  They try to put a scientific approach across, hoping to sell to the gullible.     


All thru the fields and meadows gay  ....  Enjoy   
Take Care...Cathy Go to Top of Page
belle
VIP Member


6502 Posts
Posted - 16/07/2011 : 13:33
I have always laughed at the difffering pronounciation between American and British one exapmle which doesn't change the meaning but the emphasis is "happy NEW year" (American) and "happy new YEAR" (British).


Life is what you make itGo to Top of Page
Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 17/07/2011 : 06:19
Cath, they do very well out of it as well. They still natter me!

Belle, N American English is basically 18th century English and that produces many of the different usages. Bernard Shaw commented that we were two nations divided by a common language. Very close to the truth.  I can still see the look of horror on American student's faces when I explained the 'knocker up' to them! Spotted Dick was another one, it took them a while to get their heads round that one. I arranged with the kitchen at Keele University for them to be served Spotted Dick as pudding, didn't go down well I'm afraid but at least I tried!


Stanley Challenger Graham




Barlick View
stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
Topic is 40 Pages Long:
Go to Page
  First Page  Previous Page    19  20  21  [22]  23  24   Next Page  Last Page
 


Set us as your default homepage Bookmark us Privacy   Copyright 2004-2011 www.oneguyfrombarlick.co.uk All Rights Reserved. Design by: Frost SkyPortal.net Go To Top Of Page

Page load time - 0.594