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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted -  11/10/2011  :  15:24
Khaki in colour and sombre in content. "Cravens Part in the Great War", there will not have been many households in Barlick and what was then a much larger Craven Area, that did not have at least one copy of this book. In my immediate Family there would have been at least four and I still have two of them, albeit that one is with my son on Anglesey. Over the years I have seen them at jumble sales, in second hand shops and in piles of rubbish for disposal, even left behind when a house has been vacated. They will have turned up all over the place, I have come across them in Wales, the Isle of Wight and Hampshire, the two that I have belonged to my Father and Maternal Grandfather.
Many years ago I went through one of them from cover to cover noting those from Barlick who had given their lives in the service of King and Country, my notes are long gone so I am going to do it again, a few pages at a time, but this time I will include other local places within an approximate seven mile radius, Gisburn, Foulridge, Earby and so on. I will post my findings on here with the name, address and a precis of other details, as some are quite extensive, each name is to have the page number for my reference so that if anyone wants further information, I can soon find it. In a good number of cases there is a photograph, these I will copy and post in groups of ten at suitable intervals. In the book there are 391 pages so I will use a few abreviations hopefully all self explanatory, ie, KIA:- Killed in Action. MPD:- Missing presumed Dead. DOW:- Died as a result of Wounds, and one that is all too frequent, DFD:- Died from Disease or Illness.
One Man was responsible for the existance of these books and that was Mr, Walter Morrison Esq, JP of Malham Tarn who put forward the idea of the book and defrayed the entire cost.
There is quite a bit about the war itself up to page 50, including the Rohilla Tradgedy, then comes the dreadful list of those who did not come home, and so it is that on page 57 we find the first of Barlicks Sons, and is as follows:-

2nd Lieut Harry Thornton Pickles, 3rd Bn Duke of Wellington's (West Riding) Regiment (SR) second son of Mr Stephen Pickles JP, CC, Of Raysgill Barnoldswick KIA 26th April 1916 aged 26. P57.

In these first ten pages the extent of family loss is made very clear for it was in the Village of Carleton nr Skipton that this comes up:-

P53,  Lieut. Anthony E.K. Slingsby, 1/6th Duke of Wellington's (WR) Regiment, Son of Mr and Mrs J A Slingsby Carla Beck Carleton. KIA France 14th July 1915. Aged 26.
P57,  Captain Arthur Morris Slingsby, MC 56th Punjabi Rifles,  2nd son of Mr and Mrs J A Slingsby KIA 8th March 1916 in Mesopotamia. Aged 30.
P58.  Lieut. Stephen Slingsby of HMS Defence, 4th son of Mr and Mrs J A Slingsby. KIA in North Sea June 1916. Aged 24.
This out of a total of five sons all serving.
 
Lothersdale is the next local Village with on P62.  Lieut Alec Wilson, 1st Herefordshire Regiment, Son of Mr and Mrs F J Wilson JP of Lothersdale. KIA 26th March 1917 in Egypt.
P54, Lieut. The Hon, C. A. Lister Royal Marines, Hood Battalion, Only surviving son and heir of Lord Ribblesdale of Gisburne Park DOW 28th August 1915. Elder Brother killed in 1904 in Somaliland.
Greystones, Gisburn.  Lieut. George Proctor, Lancs Fusiliers, only son of Mr and Mrs Thomas Proctor. KIA 7th April 1918 aged 24. P70.
Marton is on P73, Which Marton is not clear,  2nd Lieut, Joseph Bryan Bushby South Staffs Regiment, son of Mr and Mrs Joseph Bushby, Schoolhouse Farm Marton, DOW, 4th October 1918 aged 26.



Ed

Edited by - thomo on 11/10/2011 4:05:43 PM


thomo
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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 14/11/2011 : 12:46
Iv'e just checked the book Heather and it has Alfred in there as well. I will do some other checks and see  if we can find out.


thomo Go to Top of Page
thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 14/11/2011 : 12:56
It is F. Dunkley, but all the evidence including CWGC has him down as Frank. This first pass of editing is just removing duplicated info other corrections will be made on the second pass. I had an e/mail from Canada again this morning with an offer of help when we reach the final analysis.


thomo Go to Top of Page
tripps
Senior Member


1404 Posts
Posted - 14/11/2011 : 13:06
"Does it say "Alfred" Elsworth in the text? Because he was actually called "Albert" ... unless I've got it wrong all these years. Will have to re-record our song if he actually was called Alfred!

The 1911 census gives him as "Alfred"  and i've looked at the original.  Interestingly - his father was Albert, and the first son was often named after the father, so there is a possibility that the name was entered  wrongly?  Back to the studio!


PS
The 1901 census shows the family in Cobden Street, and he is still Alfred, so that would probably rule out the wrongly entered theory?

Edited by - tripps on 14/11/2011 1:31:41 PM


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Callunna
Revolving Grey Blob


3044 Posts
Posted - 14/11/2011 : 13:44
Looks like "Alfred" is correct! I just checked on the Rohilla website.

I have it as Albert from somewhere ... perhaps Ken Wilson's book? I used that as my reference when I wrote the song ... but I'm glad to have it cleared up now. Thanks.

And yes ... it was Frank, not Fred, Dunkley. I'm having a bad Monday! 

Edited by - Callunna on 14/11/2011 1:45:34 PMGo to Top of Page
Callunna
Revolving Grey Blob


3044 Posts
Posted - 14/11/2011 : 13:51


quote:
thomo wrote:
... Afterwards, I asked a friend to join me for a "Wet" and so it was that I visited the Cellar Bar for the first time, and finished up in the wonderful company of other locals that I respect and admire.

Amazing! That happened to me too!  ;–)Go to Top of Page
panbiker
Senior Member


2301 Posts
Posted - 14/11/2011 : 14:25
And me!

Just been doing a bit of catch up on the thread.

I noticed James Crowther the Drill Instructor that you posted on the previous page is buried somewher at Ghyll. I have just cross checked my lists and he is not on there so I will add him as another quest to be found.


Ian Go to Top of Page
gus
Regular Member


704 Posts
Posted - 14/11/2011 : 20:05
Would you believe it Me too !!!

quote:
Callunna wrote:


quote:
thomo wrote:
... Afterwards, I asked a friend to join me for a "Wet" and so it was that I visited the Cellar Bar for the first time, and finished up in the wonderful company of other locals that I respect and admire.

Amazing! That happened to me too!  ;–)




Gus

http://www.flickr.com/photos/angusbrennan/
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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 14/11/2011 : 22:43
Chaka, Chaka, Chaka!!!!!!!!!!!!!


thomo Go to Top of Page
thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 15/11/2011 : 11:47
Surname: DARBYSHIRE

Forename(s): Stanley

Place of Birth: Oldham, Lancashire

Residence: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Service No: 253286

Rank: Sapper

Regiment/Corps/Service: Royal Engineers

Battalion/Unit: 19th Division Signal Coy

Division: 19th (Western) Division

Age: --

Date of Death: 1918-04-25

Awards: -----

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: Panel 8 and 162.

CWGC Cemetery: -----

CWGC Memorial: TYNE COT MEMORIAL

Non-CWGC Burial: -----

Comments:

1901 Barnoldswick Census: 3, Robert Street - Stanley Derbyshire, aged 10 years, born Oldham, Lancashire, son of Bannister and Elizabeth Derbyshire.

Craven's Part in the Great War Entry:

SAPPER STANLEY DERBYSHIRE, Royal Engineers, of 3 Park Road, Barnoldswick, killed in action 26th April, 1918.

 

West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record Entry:

DARBYSHIRE, Sapper Stanley, aged 29 years, R.E., 3, Park Road, [Barnoldswick], killed April 26, 1918.

Article Date: 10 May 1918

Sapper S. Darbyshire, Barnoldswick
Sapper Stanley Darbyshire, R.E., was killed on April 26th, five weeks after returning from home leave. He was 27 years of age, and leaves a wife and one child living at 3 Park Road, Barnoldswick. Before joining up he was employed by Messrs. Holden Bros., Moss Shed. He had been at the Front 16 months. In a letter of sympathy to Mrs. Darbyshire a comrade writes:- "Our section was ordered up the line to lay communications for the batteries. We were together until we arrived there, when we separated, so I was not actually with him when it happened. Shortly afterwards Stanley was on his way down the line with part of the Section when a shell burst quite close to them hitting him and another. The other poor fellow was killed instantly, but Stanley lived a short time. He was unconscious until he died, so it will be some comfort to you to know that he did not suffer. The officer and sergeant did all they possibly could for him and remained with him till the end... I myself feel the loss of him very keenly as he and I came out and have been together ever since. We exchanged many confidences and were the best of chums. He was a great favourite with all his comrades, and the officers always spoke well of him, for he was always cool and very resourceful in the face of danger." A. CASSERLEY.

Article Date: 10 May 1918
DERBYSHIRE - In loving memory of Sapper Stanley Derbyshire, R.E., killed in action April 26th, 1918.
Oh! for the touch of a vanished hand,

And the sound of a voice that is still.
From his loving brother and sister, Corporal Jack Derbyshire and Cissie.

Article Date: 10 May 1918
DERBYSHIRE - In loving memory of Sapper Stanley Derbyshire, R.E., killed in action April 26th, 1918.
Just when his hopes were brightest,

Just when his thoughts were best,

He was called from this world of sorrow

To a home of eternal rest.
From his Sister, Brother, Aunt and Uncle, Albert Hill, Settle.

Article Date: 25 April 1919
DERBYSHIRE - In loving memory of Sapper Stanley Derbyshire, R.E., killed in action April 26th, 1918.
Oh! for the touch of a vanished hand,

And the sound of a voice that is still.
From his loving brother and sister, Corporal Jack Derbyshire and Cissie.
DERBYSHIRE - In loving memory of Sapper Stanley Derbyshire, R.E., killed in action April 26th, 1918.
Just when his hopes were brightest,

Just when his thoughts were best,

He was called from this world of sorrow

To a home of eternal rest.

From his Sister, Brother, Aunt and Uncle, Albert Hill, Settle

Article Date: 23 April 1920
DERBYSHIRE - In loving memory of Sapper Stanley Derbyshire, killed in action April 26th, 1918.
Time does not change our thoughts of him -

Love and dear memories linger still.
From Auntie, Uncle, Sister and Brother, Albert Hill, Settle.

Article Date: 23 April 1920
DERBYSHIRE - In loving memory of Sapper Stanley Derbyshire, killed in action April 26th, 1918.
Time does not change our thoughts of him -

Love and dear memories linger still.
From Auntie, Uncle, Sister and Brother, Albert Hill, Settle.


thomo Go to Top of Page
thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 15/11/2011 : 11:50
Surname: DAVIS

Forename(s): Thomas William

Place of Birth: Gargrave, Yorkshire

Residence: Gargrave, Yorkshire

Service No: 41551

Rank: Private

Regiment/Corps/Service: Prince of Wales's Own (West Yorkshire Regiment)

Battalion/Unit: 17th (Service) Battalion. (2nd Leeds)

Division: 35th Division

Age: 34

Date of Death: 1917-03-07

Awards: -----

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: Pier and Face 2 A 2 C and 2 D.

CWGC Cemetery: -----

CWGC Memorial: THIEPVAL MEMORIAL

Non-CWGC Burial: -----

Comments:

1911 Gargrave Census: South Street - Thomas William Davis, aged 26, born Gargrave, son of Mary Hannah Black, widow.

Craven's Part in the Great War Entry:

PRIVATE WILLIAM THOMAS DAVIS, West Yorks. Regt., son of Mrs. Davis, 8, Railway Street, Barnoldswick, killed in action 7th March, 1917. Aged 34 years.

 

West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record Entry:

DAVIS, Thomas William, [Gargrave], aged 34, West Yorkshire Regiment, killed in action March 7, 1917.

Article Date: 23 March 1917
DAVIS - Killed in action in France, March 7th, 1917, Pte. W. T. Davis, West Yorkshire Regiment, son of Mrs. Davis, 8, Railway Street, Barnoldswick, aged 34 years.

rticle Date: 23 March 1917
GARGRAVE SOLDIER KILLED IN DUG-OUT - Private Thomas William Davis
News came to hand on Sunday of the death in France of Pte. Wm. Thos. Davis, West Yorkshire Regiment, who was killed by a shell on the 7th inst. Deceased, who was 34 years of age and unmarried, was for many years employed by the Midland Railway Company as a member of the permanent way staff at Gargrave. He joined the Army about six month ago and had only been in France eight weeks. In a letter announcing the sad event to deceased's mother (who now resides at 8,Railway Street, Barnoldswick) Second-Lieutenant Jno. Marshall, of the same regiment, writes:- "He was standing at the door of his dug-out during a heavy bombardment by the enemy when a shell dropped on top of the dug-out, killing and burying him in a moment. His death is a distinct loss to my platoon. He formed one of a cheery section of whom I had great hopes, despite the fact that they had only been in France a short time."
Pte. Rd. Black, 1st Surrey Rifles, a half-brother of the above, who has been twice wounded, is now at Winchester awaiting a return to the Front. Both are on the Gargrave Parish Church Roll of Honour.

rticle Date: 08 March 1918
DAVIES - In loving memory of our dear son and brother, Private T. W. Davies, 7th West Yorks. Regiment, killed in action, March 7th, 1917. (Late Gargrave).
Somewhere in France, in a lonely grave,

Beside his comrades he is laid;

A loving son, a brother dear,

None at his grave to shed a tear.

No one who knew him need ever be told

A warmer heart death never made cold:

But an unknown grave is the bitterest blow

None but aching hearts can know.
From his loving Mother and Sisters (Barnoldswick) and brother in Egypt


thomo Go to Top of Page
thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 15/11/2011 : 11:51
Surname: DAWSON

Forename(s): William

Place of Birth: Goole, Yorkshire

Residence: Goole, Yorkshire

Service No: 12513

Rank: Private

Regiment/Corps/Service: Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment)

Battalion/Unit: 8th (Service) Battalion

Division: 11th (Northern) Division

Age: --

Date of Death: 1916-09-29

Awards: -----

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: Pier and Face 6A and 6B.

CWGC Cemetery: -----

CWGC Memorial: THIEPVAL MEMORIAL

Non-CWGC Burial: -----

Comments:

Not proven to be the W. Dawson on Barnoldswick (Conservative Club) War Memorial.

Craven's Part in the Great War Entry:

(Not in CPGW - on Barnoldswick Memorial)

 

Article Date: 17 September 1915
LINES FROM A DUG-OUT IN GALLIPOLI
Barnoldswick Soldiers' Graphic Stories of the Landing
How the 8th Duke of Wellington's Was Shattered
Writing to the Editor of this journal from 'Sunnyside Dug-out,' on the Gallipoli Peninsula, John Wm. Smith and Wm. Dawson, of the 8th Duke of Wellington's West Riding Regiment, say:-
While reading lines in your paper each week we thought we would like to drop a few lines of our experience on our landing on the Gallipoli Peninsula. We landed on the 7th of August to effect a new landing about 15 miles up the coast from Achi Baba. We had a hearty reception from the Turks in the way of shrapnel, machine gun and rifle shot. After landing we formed up and commenced our advance about11-30 p.m. We advanced something like 2,000 yards over uneven ground, when we were faced with a hail of bullets. From whence they came we did not know. But after going across the open in short rushes we came to a small hill which was evidently occupied by the Turks. We made a charge upon it, and got them cleared out after losing many men, both killed and wounded. We then made our attack further inland towards the hills, which proved also to be well set with the enemy. We again had to suffer somewhat owing to the conditions of the ground under which we were advancing. However, we got through a good deal of rifle fire over there, but our only cause for grumble was that we could not see where those Turks were, nor could we get at them. Well, we were all very hungry, so we were relieved to go back for the night to the beach.
Early next morning after a night's rest, we set out again to face the Turks. We got to our position on Sunday night, ready for an attack early on the Monday morning. When the day was breaking we all got orders to stand to. Then we started our move towards the enemy's position, which was about 700 yards from our own. We got on about 200 yards fairly well, and then had to make the 300 yards in rushes under a heavy shower of lead. We rushed up to cover about 200 yards from the Turks, after having a few losses. We then started to give them a taste of English lead, and all at once there came an order to retire from some other regiment, which put a little panic amongst some of the men. However, we had to retire on a small farm, which was held by a few of us who were left behind after the retreat.
The retreat would not have happened at all if we could have got reinforcements up in time. However, we held our ground till reinforcements arrived, then advanced again, and after very hard and fierce fighting took hold of a lot of ground. This is where we had heavy losses, and where our colonel and several more officers fell. After this hard fighting we were relieved and went into reserve trenches for a brief and well-earned rest. The next great attack of importance was on Saturday, August 20th, when

after a big bombardment we again attacked another great Turkish position. Our regiment was then composed of about 470 men and officers. We advanced in artillery formation for a while, and we were steadily losing men until we extended and made a rush for the front line of trenches. Out of these again into the open we advanced in short rushes, trying to get at the Turks with the bayonet, but they kept retreating until they got a strong position on the hills. Then we got the lead from their machine guns and rifles, which cost us a lot of men. Our brigade was called in at night after we had forced our way over more ground and driven them further back. After this big attack we had another awful roll call, and are deeply touched by the loss of so many comrades. It was in this last general attack that Hartley Dent, one of our stretcher-bearers, who also comes from Barnoldswick, lost his life. The Barnoldswick lads out here have done their share well with the rest, and all we have seen seem to be keeping up a high spirit of hope to get back to a good dinner at Christmas with the folks at home.
We are two lads from Barnoldswick, and thought we might be able to give a little account as to how the 8th Battalion lost nearly all her men in twenty-one days' fighting. We have about 300 men left out of what I think was 1,100 strong when we set out, so you will fully agree that our time has not been spent in a sort of 'picnic' style of fighting... We hope you will use this letter as you wish, as it is our first opportunity of dropping a line to the local paper which we receive regular from home. We are all short of cigarettes out here, and matches as well; any sort would do us chaps. We have to make cigarettes out of tea leaves and letters we receive from home. Well, here is "good luck" to all our friends at home and every good wish for your valuable paper, from which we get our news of home. We conclude in the best of health, and hope to hear of an early peace.
[We thank our correspondents for their letter which, we feel sure, will be read with interest by their friends at home. It may interest them to learn that our former representative at Barnoldswick, Mr. A.L. Bawden, to whom this letter was addressed, is 'doing his bit' with the Y.M.C.A. at the Front, - Editor, 'Pioneer.']


thomo Go to Top of Page
thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 15/11/2011 : 15:38
Surname: DEAN

Forename(s): Hartley

Place of Birth: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Residence: -----

Service No: Mersey Z/1553

Rank: Able-Seaman

Regiment/Corps/Service: Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve

Battalion/Unit: S.S. 'Calliope'

Division: not applicable - Royal Navy

Age: 20

Date of Death: 1917-07-09

Awards: -----

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: 24.

CWGC Cemetery: -----

CWGC Memorial: PLYMOUTH NAVAL MEMORIAL

Non-CWGC Burial: -----

Comments:

No entry in SD - Navy.

1911 Barnoldswick Census: 3, Hartley Street - Hartley Dean, aged 13 years, born Barnoldswick, son of John and Nancy Dean.

Craven's Part in the Great War Entry:

SEAMAN GUNNER HARTLEY DEAN, R.N., son of Mr. & Mrs. John Dean, 2, Harper Street, Barnoldswick, presumed drowned in the Mediterranean Sea 29th June, 1917.

 

Article Date: 23 May 1919
BARNOLDSWICK - DEATH PRESUMED
Seaman Gunner Hartley Dean, whose death is also presumed, was the son of Mr. and Mrs. John Dean, 2 Harper Street, Barnoldswick. He joined the R.N.V.R. in 1916, on reaching the age of 18, and received his training at Crystal Palace and Whale Island Gunnery School. From the latter place he went to Cardiff to take up the position of gunner on the 'Calliope', a collier transport, and made two voyages to the Mediterranean. Returning from one of these, his last letter home was dated from Seville (Spain), June 20th 1917, since when there is no further news of his vessel or crew. Gunner Dean was formerly employed by Messrs. S. Pickles and Sons, Calf Hall Shed. He was a talented musician, having passed A.L.C.M. (Associate), London College of Music in 1915, and licentiate of the same college.

Article Date: 06 August 1915
BARNOLDSWICK
Hartley Dean, of Barnoldswick, pupil of Mr. Benj. Wilkinson, of Colne, has been successful in taking the Diploma of Associate (A.L.C.M.) in connection with the London College of Music examination held at Manchester early in July (pianoforte playing).


thomo Go to Top of Page
thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 15/11/2011 : 15:42
Main CPGW Record

Surname: DENT

Forename(s): Hartley

Place of Birth: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Residence: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Service No: 11310

Rank: Private

Regiment/Corps/Service: Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment)

Battalion/Unit: 8th (Service) Battalion

Division: 11th (Northern) Division

Age: 23

Date of Death: 1915-08-21

Awards: -----

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: Panel 117 to 119.

CWGC Cemetery: -----

CWGC Memorial: HELLES MEMORIAL

Non-CWGC Burial: -----

Comments:

Soldiers Died gives his Theatre of War (erroneously) as 'France & Flanders'.

1911 Barnoldswick Census: 17, Park Road - Hartley Dent, aged 20 years, born Banoldswick, grandson of Thomas and Elizabeth Dent. [Also living at the same address was Annie Dent, single, aged 40 years, daughter of Thomas and Elizabeth Dent.]

Craven's Part in the Great War Entry:

PRIVATE HARTLEY DENT, Duke of Well.'s Regt., of Barnoldswick, killed in action in Gallipoli 21st August, 1915. Aged 24 years.

 

West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record Entry:

DENT, Hartley, of Barnoldswick, died from wounds received in the DARDANELLES, 1915.

 

A report of the death of a Barnoldswick soldier named Hartley Dent has been received in the town, but no confirmation has been received up to last night. He is 24 years of age, and his home is at 17, Park Road, Barnoldswick.

Article Date: 17 September 1915
DENT - August 21st, killed while acting as stretcher-bearer in the Dardanelles, Pte. Hartley Dent, formerly of Barnoldswick

Article Date: 17 September 1915
BARNOLDSWICK STRETCHER BEARER KILLED IN THE DARDANELLES
The news of the death of Private Hartley Dent (unofficially reported last week) was confirmed by the receipt of an intimation from the War Office on Sunday morning as having taken place on August 21st in Gallipoli. Private Dent, who was 24 years of age, belonged to a well-known Barnoldswick family, being the grandson of the late Mr. Thos. Dent, 17, Park Road, where he resided up to joining the Army last September. He was a stretcher bearer in the 'X' Company, 8th Battalion, Duke of Wellington's Regiment, and left England for the Mediterranean on July 8th.
The circumstances of his death are narrated in the following letter (received on Tuesday) from Private Herbert Scott, a stretcher bearer attached to the 'W' Company of the same regiment:- "We were making an advance on Saturday and were following in the rear of our Battalion with the stretchers. I was carrying the stretcher along with your son, and we were moving under heavy rifle fire from the enemy. We had taken about a dozen poor fellows back wounded and were going to the aid of another poor fellow who had been shot through the eye, when all at once the stretcher dropped. When I looked round I found Hartley had been shot through the head. I shouted "Hartley! Hartley!" but he never uttered a word. I feel very much upset, as he was a good lad and we all got on well together. All our stretcher bearers, along with myself, send our deepest sympathy to you in your sad bereavement. It is awful the way the enemy fire upon the Red Cross."

Article Date: 17 September 1915
BARNOLDSWICK CASUALTIES IN GALLIPOLI
In a letter to his mother, Mrs. Holmes, 20, Wellington Street, Barnoldswick, Private Wilfred Holmes, 'Z' Company, Duke of Wellington's Regiment, writes:- "Just a few lines hoping you are in the best of health, as it leaves me at present. Excuse writing paper, as we cannot get any more here. We have now been out here in this hell for nearly three weeks, and are just longing for a good rest out of reach of shells and bullets. Our division have lost terribly heavy. There are only about 800 of our regiment left now all told, and one officer. I am not going to tell you anything of what I have seen, but I have seen what I never wish to see again. I saw Harry Hayes go down the trench the other day. (Hayes lived at 41, Wellington Street). He had been hit in the thigh by the look of him. He said "It has nearly broken me in two." Eddie Bottomley got wounded on the jaw, and Hartley Dent, another Barlicker, got killed. He was a stretcher bearer, I think. A parcel would be a treat. I have not received a letter or anything yet, and home is our whole study."

rticle Date: 17 September 1915
LINES FROM A DUG-OUT IN GALLIPOLI
Barnoldswick Soldiers' Graphic Stories of the Landing
How the 8th Duke of Wellington's Was Shattered
Writing to the Editor of this journal from 'Sunnyside Dug-out,' on the Gallipoli Peninsula, John Wm. Smith and Wm. Dawson, of the 8th Duke of Wellington's West Riding Regiment, say:-
While reading lines in your paper each week we thought we would like to drop a few lines of our experience on our landing on the Gallipoli Peninsula. We landed on the 7th of August to effect a new landing about 15 miles up the coast from Achi Baba. We had a hearty reception from the Turks in the way of shrapnel, machine gun and rifle shot. After landing we formed up and commenced our advance about11-30 p.m. We advanced something like 2,000 yards over uneven ground, when we were faced with a hail of bullets. From whence they came we did not know. But after going across the open in short rushes we came to a small hill which was evidently occupied by the Turks. We made a charge upon it, and got them cleared out after losing many men, both killed and wounded. We then made our attack further inland towards the hills, which proved also to be well set with the enemy. We again had to suffer somewhat owing to the conditions of the ground under which we were advancing. However, we got through a good deal of rifle fire over there, but our only cause for grumble was that we could not see where those Turks were, nor could we get at them. Well, we were all very hungry, so we were relieved to go back for the night to the beach.
Early next morning after a night's rest, we set out again to face the Turks. We got to our position on Sunday night, ready for an attack early on the Monday morning. When the day was breaking we all got orders to stand to. Then we started our move towards the enemy's position, which was about 700 yards from our own. We got on about 200 yards fairly well, and then had to make the 300 yards in rushes under a heavy shower of lead. We rushed up to cover about 200 yards from the Turks, after having a few losses. We then started to give them a taste of English lead, and all at once there came an order to retire from some other regiment, which put a little panic amongst some of the men. However, we had to retire on a small farm, which was held by a few of us who were left behind after the retreat.
The retreat would not have happened at all if we could have got reinforcements up in time. However, we held our ground till reinforcements arrived, then advanced again, and after very hard and fierce fighting took hold of a lot of ground. This is where we had heavy losses, and where our colonel and several more officers fell. After this hard fighting we were relieved and went into reserve trenches for a brief and well-earned rest. The next great attack of importance was on Saturday, August 20th, when after a big bombardment we again attacked another great Turkish position. Our regiment was then composed of about 470 men and officers. We advanced in artillery formation for a while, and we were steadily losing men until we extended and made a rush for the front line of trenches. Out of these again into the open we advanced in short rushes, trying to get at the Turks with the bayonet, but they kept retreating until they got a strong position on the hills. Then we got the lead from their machine guns and rifles, which cost us a lot of men. Our brigade was called in at night after we had forced our way over more ground and driven them further back. After this big attack we had another awful roll call, and are deeply touched by the loss of so many comrades. It was in this last general attack that Hartley Dent, one of our stretcher-bearers, who also comes from Barnoldswick, lost his life. The Barnoldswick lads out here have done their share well with the rest, and all we have seen seem to be keeping up a high spirit of hope to get back to a good dinner at Christmas with the folks at home.
We are two lads from Barnoldswick, and thought we might be able to give a little account as to how the 8th Battalion lost nearly all her men in twenty-one days' fighting. We have about 300 men left out of what I think was 1,100 strong when we set out, so you will fully agree that our time has not been spent in a sort of 'picnic' style of fighting... We hope you will use this letter as you wish, as it is our first opportunity of dropping a line to the local paper which we receive regular from home. We are all short of cigarettes out here, and matches as well; any sort would do us chaps. We have to make cigarettes out of tea leaves and letters we receive from home. Well, here is "good luck" to all our friends at home and every good wish for your valuable paper, from which we get our news of home. We conclude in the best of health, and hope to hear of an early peace.
[We thank our correspondents for their letter which, we feel sure, will be read with interest by their friends at home. It may interest them to learn that our former representative at Barnoldswick, Mr. A.L. Bawden, to whom this letter was addressed, is 'doing his bit' with the Y.M.C.A. at the Front, - Editor, 'Pioneer.']

BARLICKER'S' DEATH IN THE DARDANELLES
The War Office intimation has been received of the death from wounds in the Dardanelles of Private Hartley Dent, a Barnoldswick soldier, news of whose death appeared in the 'Pioneer' columns last week. A member of a well known Barnoldswick family, Private Dent was extremely popular amongst his comrades at the Front, as is testified by the following letter from Private H. Scott, a comrade in the same regiment, who was with Private Dent when he was shot. The letter is dated August 24th, and is addressed to Mrs. Dent. It says:- "Just a few lines in sympathy with you, and to let you know that you dear son, Hartley, has passed away, having been shot through the heart. We were making an advance on Saturday last, and were following in the rear of our battalion with the stretchers. I was carrying the stretcher along with your Hartley, and we were moving along under heavy fire from the enemy. We had taken about a dozen poor fellows back wounded, and were then going to the aid of another poor fellow who had been shot through the eye, when all at once the stretcher dropped. When I looked round I saw that Hartley had been wounded. I shouted "Hartley! Hartley!" but he never uttered a word. I feel very much upset, as he was a good lad, and we all got on well together. All our stretcher bearers, along with myself, send our deepest sympathy to you in your sad bereavement. It is awful the way in which the enemy fire upon the Red Cross. I must close now. Hoping you will try to bear the sad news which will come as a great shock, but you will be able to say that he died fighting for his King and country, and fighting well. If I am spared to come back safe and sound I will tell you all about him. - From his chums on the battlefield. - H. Scott."
Private Dent had only been out at the Dardanelles a few weeks when he was killed.

8th (Service) Bn. Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment)
AUGUST 1915
Attack on Ismail Oglu Tepe (21st). Official History of the Gallipoli Campaign records that the Battalion, with 9th West Yorkshire, were hurried forward to capture first objective, but they swung left-handed. Ending up in position north of Hetman Chair. An attempt was then made to assault a communication trench, but this turned out to be a heavily defended fire trench. 'The enemy's resistance could not be overcome; and the troops fell back towards the southern slopes of Green Hill.' War Diary records 'high casualties.'

[Hartley Dent was killed in this attack.]


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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 15/11/2011 : 15:43
Surname: DEWHURST

Forename(s): Thomas

Place of Birth: Portsmouth, Hampshire

Residence: -----

Service No: 270379

Rank: Private

Regiment/Corps/Service: Royal Scots (Lothian Regiment)

Battalion/Unit: 16th (Service) Battalion. (2nd Edinburgh)

Division: 34th Division

Age: 42

Date of Death: 1917-08-28

Awards: -----

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: Pier and Face 6 D and 7 D.

CWGC Cemetery: -----

CWGC Memorial: THIEPVAL MEMORIAL

Non-CWGC Burial: -----

Comments:

Brother of William Dewhurst (67733). His sister Clara, wife of Robert Hebden (29/618) died in the sinking of the 'Lusitania' on May 7, 1915 (see William Dewhurst's CH article from 1919-07-04).

Craven's Part in the Great War Entry:

PRIVATE TOM DEWHURST, Royal Scots, of 16, Far East View, Barnoldswick, killed in action 28th August, 1917. Aged 41 years.

 

West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record Entry:

DEWHURST, Thomas, aged 41 years, Royal Scots, 18, Far East View, [Barnoldswick], killed in action Aug. 28, 1917.

Article Date: 07 September 1917
DEWHURST - August 28th 1917, killed in action in France, Private Thomas Dewhurst, Royal Scots, husband of Mrs. Dewhurst, 16, Far East View, Barnoldswick, aged 41 years.

Article Date: 07 September 1917
BARNOLDSWICK - KILLED IN ACTION
Mrs. T. Dewhurst, 18, Far East View, Barnoldswick, received on Tuesday night the following letter from an officer in France:- "Dear Madam, - It is with great regret that I have to tell you that your husband, Private Thomas Dewhurst (Royal Scots) was killed in action on the 28th August. The Battalion took part in a very successful action in which we captured one part of the German lines, and it was during this action that your husband was killed. He was buried where he fell, and you will no doubt receive notification from the War Office later. Please accept my sincere sympathy in the great loss you have sustained."

Private Dewhurst was 41 years of age and leaves two children. He joined up in October last, but did not go to France until June this year. He was formerly a weaver at Aldersley's, Butts Mill.

Article Date: 07 September 1917
MORE BARNOLDSWICK CASUALTIES
Killed in Action

Mrs. T. Dewhurst, 16, Far East View, Barnoldswick, received on Tuesday night the following letters from an officer in France:- "Dear Madam, - It is with great regret that I have to tell you that your husband, Pte. Thos. Dewhurst, (Royal Scots), was killed in action on the 13th August. The battalion took part in a very successful action in which we captured one part of the German lines, and it was during this action that your husband was killed. He was buried where he fell, and you will no doubt receive notification from the War Office later. Please accept my sincere sympathy in the great loss you have sustained."

Pte. Dewhurst was 41 years of age, and leaves two children. He joined up in October last, but did not go out to France until June this year. He was formerly a weaver at Aldersley's, Butts Mill.

The Royal Scots 1914-1918. Major J. Ewing M.C. Oliver and Boyd 1925
16th (Service) Bn. Royal Scots (Lothian Regiment) (2nd Edinburgh)

1917
The Battalion moved into front line trenches at Hargicourt in July 1917. Following a successful attack on the 26th August, and the new gains had been consolidated and protected by wire. The chief trials of the 16th Royal Scots on the 27th August were due to the enemy's artillery fire and sniping, for the German infantry made no attempt to attack. The same conditions prevailed on the 28th, on the evening of which date two small parties of Boches approached our trenches but were easily driven off by rifle and lewis gun fire.

[Thomas Dewhurst was killed on the 28th August 1917.]

Article Date: 04 July 1919
BARNOLDSWICK FAMILY'S THIRD BEREAVEMENT
The official intimation from the War Office presuming the death of Lance Corporal Wm. Dewhurst, Machine Gun Corps, represents the third loss during the war suffered by Mrs. Thos. Dewhurst, a widow residing at 3 Federation Street, Barnoldswick. Lance Corporal Dewhurst, who was 35 years of age and unmarried, had been missing since November 30th 1917, having arrived in France on the 17th March previous.
His elder brother, Pte. Thos. Dewhurst, was killed in August of the same year, while his only sister (Mrs. Robert Hebden) was lost on the Lusitania. Mrs. Dewhurst would be grateful for any more detailed information as to the fate of her son.


thomo Go to Top of Page
thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 15/11/2011 : 15:44
Surname: DEWHURST

Forename(s): William

Place of Birth: Helmshore, Lancashire

Residence: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Service No: 67733

Rank: L/Corporal

Regiment/Corps/Service: Machine Gun Corps (Infantry)

Battalion/Unit: 217th Coy

Division: 20th (Light) Division

Age: 32

Date of Death: 1917-11-30

Awards: -----

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: Panel 12 and 13.

CWGC Cemetery: -----

CWGC Memorial: CAMBRAI MEMORIAL, LOUVERVAL

Non-CWGC Burial: -----

Comments:

1901 Barnoldswick Census: William Dewhurst, aged 15 years, born Helmshore, Lancashire, son of Thomas and Ann Dewhurst.

Brother of Thomas Dewhurst (270379). His sister Clara, wife of Robert Hebden (29/618), died in the sinking of the 'Lusitania' on May 7, 1915.

Craven's Part in the Great War Entry:

LANCE-CORPORAL WILLIAM DEWHURST, Machine Gun Corps, of 3, Federation Street, Barnoldswick, reported missing since 30th November, 1917. Aged 35 years.Article Date: 18 January 1918

BARNOLDSWICK - WOUNDED AND MISSING
Private William Dewhurst, West Yorks. Regiment, son of Mrs. Dewhurst, Federation Street, Barnoldswick, has been posted as missing in France since November 27th.

Article Date: 04 July 1919
BARNOLDSWICK FAMILY'S THIRD BEREAVEMENT
The official intimation from the War Office presuming the death of Lance Corporal Wm. Dewhurst, Machine Gun Corps, represents the third loss during the war suffered by Mrs. Thos. Dewhurst, a widow residing at 3 Federation Street, Barnoldswick. Lance Corporal Dewhurst, who was 35 years of age and unmarried, had been missing since November 30th 1917, having arrived in France on the 17th March previous.
His elder brother, Pte. Thos. Dewhurst, was killed in August of the same year, while his only sister (Mrs. Robert Hebden) was lost on the Lusitania. Mrs. Dewhurst would be grateful for any more detailed information as to the fate of her son.


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