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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted -  14/11/2010  :  06:41
New version to make loading easier'

Old topic is HERE


Stanley Challenger Graham




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stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk
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panbiker
Senior Member


2300 Posts
Posted - 14/02/2011 : 10:34
I think we have done "cheese at fourpence" for hanging around more than once. It's in the Lancashire Sayings article and I think we have covered it in this topic and it's archived 90 odd page predecessor.


Ian Go to Top of Page
Bradders
Senior Member


1880 Posts
Posted - 14/02/2011 : 11:30
Thanks Ian .....I should've checked ...Ha!


BRADDERS BLUESINGER Go to Top of Page
Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 15/02/2011 : 05:26
No harm in revisiting things occasionally. None of us can remember all the interesting phrases we have furtled.

I remembered something from my army days yesterday. We all had our personal knife, fork and spoon and called them 'Connor irons'. Anyone come across that one?


Stanley Challenger Graham




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Sunray10
Regular Member


557 Posts
Posted - 15/02/2011 : 21:53
What about this one then "I'm mad as a butcher's hat". Something to do with the funny hats butchers wear ?


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catgate
Senior Member


1764 Posts
Posted - 16/02/2011 : 19:42
"As throng as Throp's wife" was one I used to hear in my childhood.


Every silver lining has a cloud.


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 17/02/2011 : 05:52
I've heard that used Catty but many years ago. Watched Nell Oliver TV prog on Neolithic Man last night. It was suggested that the phrase 'daily grind' orininated in the fact that to grind enough grain for a family someone had to spend at least an hour every day on their knees using a quern, a hand grinding stone.


Stanley Challenger Graham




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belle
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6502 Posts
Posted - 17/02/2011 : 10:48
That sounds about right to me Stanley...Sunray are you mixing up "mad as a hatter" with "as fit as a butchers dog?"


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 18/02/2011 : 05:14
Got another possible 'taking the biscuit' reference yesterday. I was talking to my old mate Steve and he happened to have the OED up on his screen so he looked it up. Evidently the army at one time used sectional mattresses, three squares made up a full mattress. The lads called them 'biscuits' because they looked like a large version of hard tack.


Stanley Challenger Graham




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Tizer
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5150 Posts
Posted - 18/02/2011 : 09:34
Like a palliasse?


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 19/02/2011 : 05:54
That was in one piece I think.


Stanley Challenger Graham




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Another
Traycle Mine Overseer


6250 Posts
Posted - 19/02/2011 : 07:49
I havn't followed this thread in detail so apologies if this has come before. 

Out with Misty this morning I recalled the word we used as youngsters to describe starlings as "shebbies". Was this commonplace? Nolic 


" I'm a self made man who worships his creator" Go to Top of Page
panbiker
Senior Member


2300 Posts
Posted - 19/02/2011 : 10:18
Same with me Nolic, shebbies. Did you see the bit on the TV the other night where a couple of bird trainers had trained 6 starlings to study their flocking instinct, fascinating stuff, they would fly alongside the car when they were driving following "mum & dad". did'nt know they could mimic as well but that was demonstrated as well. Clever little shebbies.

Forgot.. I think we have done it before in this thread or the one before.

Edited by - panbiker on 19/02/2011 10:18:57


Ian Go to Top of Page
Bradders
Senior Member


1880 Posts
Posted - 19/02/2011 : 11:14
Went on a Cadet camp once to Boureley ?(Aldershot , anyway ) and was issued with a Palliasse......I seem to remember it was slightly mummy shaped and I am sure it was filled with straw....In fact I think we had to fill our own !


BRADDERS BLUESINGER Go to Top of Page
Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 20/02/2011 : 04:39
That's the beast Brad. Shebbies, I think I've heard that one before but never used it.


Stanley Challenger Graham




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stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 22/02/2011 : 04:58
Came across a word root yesterday that has often puzzled me. Ever heard the mechanism that drove a spit automatically called a 'jack'? Daniel Boorstin is talking about the origins of clocks and measurement of time in the book I am reading at the moment, 'The Discoverers'. On page 45 he says that when the early clockmakers made figures with hammers to ring a bell from the outside, as opposed to an internal clapper, they called the figures 'Jacks'. This originated in Jacquemart, a contraction of Jacques and Marteau (hammer). This word 'jack' came to be used for any tool that saved labour so we got the spit-jack, the car-jack etc.


Stanley Challenger Graham




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