Visit the historic Lancashire Textile Project with over 500 photos and 190 taped interviews|2|0
Go to Page
  First Page  Previous Page    124  125  126  [127]  128  129   Next Page  Last Page
Author Previous Topic Topic Next Topic  
Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted -  14/11/2010  :  06:26
NEW VERSION TO MAKE IT EASIER FOR MEMBERS WITH SLOW CONNECTIONS TO CONNECT.

Follw this LINK for last version.


Stanley Challenger Graham




Barlick View
stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk
Replies
Author
Go to Page
  First Page  Previous Page    124  125  126  [127]  128  129   Next Page  Last Page
 
Tizer
VIP Member


5150 Posts
Posted - 01/08/2011 : 17:04
Stanley, in your 05.23 post I think you need to change `Afghanistan' to `Libya'.

News just out that HSBC is sacking 30,000 employees worlwide and giving up retail banking in Russia and Poland.The chief exec says: "The global economy appears to be losing momentum in its recovery. Financial markets globally will likely be volatile over the rest of this year and into 2012."

Investment banks are not doing so well now, partly due to the new banking regulations, but it hasn't brought down the astronomical salaries - they are sacking people and keeping the salaries high for the the survivors.


Go to Top of Page
Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 02/08/2011 : 05:15
Tiz, re post, thanks, you're right, I've changed it. Dyslexia kicking in?

I heard the HSBC news as well. I noted that all the cuts are outside UK and the forecast that other bank results might not be as good as HSBC. I think he's right about global economy, we are on a knife edge. Remember Harold? "Events dear boy". 

There was a good piece on World Service a couple of days ago about the dangers of opportunistic traders shifting their attention from financial instruments to commodities like food and energy. (draining money out of the world economy by taking opportunistic profits!) I reflected on another programme I had listened to describing Titus Salt and his attitudes to workers at Saltaire. What many people forget is that Titus made his money by combining with two other wealthy mill owners, one at Black Dyke at Queensbury and another I forget. Each year the three of them used their wealth to corner the market in Cashmere, Vicuna and Angora (I think I've got them right, memory fails me.) They each specialised in one fibre and made millions by controlling the market. Nothing new under the sun.

I watched the Panorama programme on cheap booze last night. Some very credible contributors who all agreed that the basic problems were price, availability and marketing. There was a lady from the government, (Ann Milton? PS for Public Health?) who didn't address any of these subjects, just kept saying it "was important to cooperate with everyone to make an improvement" I paraphrase but that was her line. There was a priceless moment when at oe point she told the interviewer that they seemed to be having a 'communication problem'. She was right! turned out that she didn't know there was a standing committee of representatives from the health sector, the drinks industry and civil servants examining the problem of excessive drinking. The question that threw her was when she was asked why 7 members of the 16 total on the committee (including the civil servants) were from the drinks industry. The health members of the committee said that as soon as price and availability came up for discussion debate died. Surprise surprise!


Stanley Challenger Graham




Barlick View
stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
wendyf
Senior Member


1439 Posts
Posted - 02/08/2011 : 08:55
I think it was alpaca that Titus Salt made his money from. It used to be used as ballast on ships, being considered too fine for weaving until Titus, having seen bales stacked on the docks in Liverpool, found a way of manufacturing fine cloth from it.


Go to Top of Page
Tizer
VIP Member


5150 Posts
Posted - 02/08/2011 : 09:21
quote:
Stanley wrote: They each specialised in one fibre and made millions by controlling the market. Nothing new under the sun.
These days, if you can't buy up all the commodities, machines or labour you use your money to flood the market with promotionial material to get the same result...Bill Gates and Microsoft through the1990s for example.

Edited by - Tizer on 02/08/2011 09:22:10


Go to Top of Page
Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 02/08/2011 : 12:42
Wendy, you're right, I think it was alpaca at Salts, and angora and vicuna at the other two. I once brought ten tons of raw Angora into Westfield when they were a wool scourer. This was in about 1960 and it was worth 3/6 an ounce in the raw dirty state I think. That made it over £6,000 a ton!

I came back on because I forgot to tell you I saw something on Letcliffe at weekend I haven't seen for years. Two lasses climbing trees like monkeys! Not a lot of it about!


Stanley Challenger Graham




Barlick View
stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
tripps
Senior Member


1404 Posts
Posted - 02/08/2011 : 21:10
I'm a bit of a fan of Titus and Saltaire.  Jim Greenhalf's book "Salt and Siver" tells the story of the restoration of his mill, and starts with this description of his funeral.  It  is inspirational.  I know it was decades later, but there is an interesting contrast between Saltaire, and Engel's Manchester. 


Go to Top of Page
catgate
Senior Member


1764 Posts
Posted - 02/08/2011 : 21:58


quote:
tripps wrote:
I'm a bit of a fan of Titus and Saltaire. 

So am I. 

I had a lifesaving anti-tetanus injection at Salts Hospital abot 1950 and my younger sister was educated at Salts Grammar school round about the same time.


Every silver lining has a cloud.


Go to Top of Page
Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 03/08/2011 : 05:10
Catty, lots of tetanus and other infections in the raw fibre in Bradford. The bales of fibre weren't usually sewn up, they were closed with big splinters of hardwood used like a safety pin and it was a given that if you got a scratch off one of them you got a septic wound, they were deadly!  I got one but I always had me anti-tet up to dateso it soon cleared up.

Interesting piece on WS this morning about Iceland. Despite allowing the banks to go bankrupt and defaulting they have just got a large low interest loan and because currency has dropped they are having a tourism boom. There may be life beyond bankruptcy.


Stanley Challenger Graham




Barlick View
stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
Tardis
Regular Member


453 Posts
Posted - 03/08/2011 : 17:29

At least 216 letters have been posted with security codes for door entry and key safe boxes printed on the front of the envelopes.

The confidential information is used by carers and nurses to gain entry to immobile patients’ homes.

But it was wrongly added to records on the Personal Demographic Service, part of the NHS “Spine” database that holds the contact details of every patient in England, and then put onto address labels when letters were sent out.


Good job those computer records have today been slammed as unworkable?

Human error?


Go to Top of Page
wendyf
Senior Member


1439 Posts
Posted - 03/08/2011 : 18:26
I have been talking to my insurance company today (the NFU) about a renewal for an elderly Citroen Saxo which has been insured for 3rd party fire & theft for a number of years. The premium had increased considerably. The nice young lady I spoke to came back with a quote which reduced the payment by £180. How? By insuring the car Fully Comp.!!


Go to Top of Page
catgate
Senior Member


1764 Posts
Posted - 03/08/2011 : 21:46
Two salient points emerge from the above

1) Titus Salt's daliance with ancient Etruscan labyrinths never seem to be mentioned in print.

2) During 1948 and 1949 Phillip Hockney (a much older brother of David Hockney) and I used to do "practical chemistry" together two mornings per week at grammar school.


Every silver lining has a cloud.


Go to Top of Page
Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 04/08/2011 : 05:14
I didn't know either of those facts Catty. I like his ideas on architecture.

Doc called in yesterday and we went up to Prospect to play out.  He looks well, hard to believe we nearly lost him. Prospect is looking tidy and he's getting the road planed this week. Work on the new platform is still going on, he's whittling the problems of file transfer down but at the moment he's having a problem with linked in pics. I never did like them. Far better if pics are posted on the site. I realised at tea-time I had enjoyed his visit so much I'd forgotten to have my lunch! Nice day.....


Stanley Challenger Graham




Barlick View
stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
Tardis
Regular Member


453 Posts
Posted - 04/08/2011 : 10:36

Richard Handl said that he had the radioactive elements radium, americium and uranium in his apartment in southern Sweden when police showed up and arrested him on charges of unauthorised possession of nuclear material.

Handl, 31, said he had tried for months to set up a nuclear reactor at home and kept a blog about his experiments, describing how he created a small meltdown on his stove.

Only later did he realise it might not be legal and sent a question to Sweden’s Radiation Authority, which answered by sending the police.

“I have always been interested in physics and chemistry,” Handl said, adding he just wanted to “see if it’s possible to split atoms at home”.


Not sure if this should go here or on the science topic

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/howaboutthat/8679630/Swedish-man-arrested-after-trying-to-split-atoms-in-his-kitchen.html

lolol


Go to Top of Page
Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 05/08/2011 : 07:44
I saw it. A lonely nutter who may have poisoned himself.

What grabbed me was how satisfying it was to send presents to two of my friends that they weren't expecting and how satisfying it was to be able to cut a casting in the workshop to a rational and useful shape. Try doing that with your bare hands! Ultimate control, not like the world outside the shed. That's our only defence in times like these, be nice to your friends and relax in whatever environment gives you control and suits you best. Life is too short to spend it worrying about things you have no control of.


Stanley Challenger Graham




Barlick View
stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 05/08/2011 : 09:12
Good news, Just seen Jack Batley as I went down to Broiwn's butchers and he has a dog! It's a bedraggled 12 month old Yorkie cross called Wisp that has been starved and beaten, it's frightened of its shadow. The worse thing that has happened to it in the last couple of days is that Jack had to cut the matted clumps out of its coat and it looks horrible!  It's so emaciated the vet couldn't chip it or inject it, it will have to gain some condition first. BUT! IU can't think of a better man than Jack to do the job, it still has a spark in it, it came to me to have a sniff and let me touch it and it wasn't phased by Jack's attentions so there is hope for it yet. I wish Jack all the best and forecast that in a few months it will have a shine on its muck and be getting into mischief! By the way, he loved the article and I have advised him to borrow a couple of Peacocks for a week or two. He had noted the heifer bawling at Jimmy Mole's, the same one I heard the other day. She was bulling and letting the world know. I wonder whether a complaint went in about that! I hope it drove the complainant potty, serves them right!


Stanley Challenger Graham




Barlick View
stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
Topic is 167 Pages Long:
Go to Page
  First Page  Previous Page    124  125  126  [127]  128  129   Next Page  Last Page
 


Set us as your default homepage Bookmark us Privacy   Copyright 2004-2011 www.oneguyfrombarlick.co.uk All Rights Reserved. Design by: Frost SkyPortal.net Go To Top Of Page

Page load time - 1.203