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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted -  14/11/2010  :  06:41
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Stanley Challenger Graham




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stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk
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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 27/11/2011 : 05:42
I agree Cathy but intriguing. There must be a common myth behind this image, it's so widespread. At the risk of offending someone, have a look at this LINK. This fear crops up in a lot of myths and legends and may have something to do with the images.

 Hare's one for Tripps. My dad used to have a saying: "Your kindness and consideration will never be obliterated from the annals of my future profundities" God knows what the origin was but there's a good word, profundities, for you to trot out as occasion demands!


Stanley Challenger Graham




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Bodger
Regular Member


892 Posts
Posted - 27/11/2011 : 10:10
"weird" i think the general thought is that they originate in the pagan past, and depict Mother Earth


"You can only make as well as you can measure"
                           Joseph Whitworth
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Tizer
VIP Member


5150 Posts
Posted - 27/11/2011 : 10:54
Maybe, Bodger, but the old stone masons had a sense of humour and perhaps the image is more analogous with `mooning'! The church is good at finding justifications for interesting images, e.g. a church near where I live (from Wikipedia): "St Peter and St Paul Parish Church, adjacent to Muchelney Abbey, has a ceiling enlivened with Jacobean paintings of bare-breasted angels, their nudity thought to symbolize innocent purity."

Edited by - Tizer on 27/11/2011 11:00:47


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belle
VIP Member


6502 Posts
Posted - 28/11/2011 : 10:26
It could of course be a warning re the prophetic Whore of Babylon mentioned in the book of  Revelation..or a ref to the inticements of loose women that deter those seeking wisdom and the knowledge of God..mentioned in the book of Proverbs.
I guess it depends on whether the stonemasons where carving to order .. and commissioned by those who knew such imagery was in the bible... I might go and read  some Chaucer..to see how much the public were aware of this imagery.

Edited by - belle on 28/11/2011 10:29:02 AM


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Bodger
Regular Member


892 Posts
Posted - 29/11/2011 : 09:39
A word in my mind, "sothered",not sure of area, maybe Cheshire ?

It's use, " by ek lad tha fair sothered that, tha must a bin reit clemmed wi t'unger" ie. to eat wolfishly


"You can only make as well as you can measure"
                           Joseph Whitworth
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Callunna
Revolving Grey Blob


3044 Posts
Posted - 29/11/2011 : 19:23
Can't remember if it was in this topic where we discussed how modern useage has altered many innocuous sayings and has rendered them off limits in polite conversation (eg 'dogging').

Well today I stumbled upon another one. I was shoving a bit of junk into the little room off the kitchen which is used for storing ironing boards, hoovers and other items which are rarely used in our house.

I said: "It's a good job we have a Glory Hole for all this stuff" and our 30-year-old almost choked on his cuppa. Go to Top of Page
Bodger
Regular Member


892 Posts
Posted - 29/11/2011 : 19:33
Ay we have a glory hole, and always had


"You can only make as well as you can measure"
                           Joseph Whitworth
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Julie in Norfolk
Senior Member


1632 Posts
Posted - 30/11/2011 : 03:00
Glory holes tended to be under the stairs in our house.


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 30/11/2011 : 05:00
Never heard it Bodge. My equivalent would probably be 'necked'.

I have a vague memory that Glory Hole has a naval root.


Stanley Challenger Graham




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belle
VIP Member


6502 Posts
Posted - 30/11/2011 : 08:34
Call we have discussed that but not sure if it was on this topic..

Like Stanley, Bodger ..it's a word I've not heard of.


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Callunna
Revolving Grey Blob


3044 Posts
Posted - 30/11/2011 : 09:47
I'm not sure if folks have cottoned on to the 'glory hole' problem phrase - yes it was/is a place, usually under the stairs or other such space, that is/was used to store all the things you had no other place for in the house ... but alas the phrase has come to have a, shall we say, less than pleasant connotation.

Modesty and decency prevents me from even adding a link on here, but go to the Urban Dictionary website and you'll see what I mean. 

I suppose what I'm warning people is: only refer to a 'glory hole' in this context with people over, say, the age of 50. And even then, make certain they know you're talking about the understairs cupboard. EmbarassedGo to Top of Page
Tizer
VIP Member


5150 Posts
Posted - 30/11/2011 : 10:08
Heather, thanks for the warning but if we don't carry on using the words in their proper context and meaning then we'll lose them all! I heard someone on the radio this morning refer to an old codex in a museum archive as being `the size of a blackberry' - as it was a kind of small book I suspect that he means something bigger than what I know as a blackberry!


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tripps
Senior Member


1404 Posts
Posted - 30/11/2011 : 12:05
I've just checked this phrase in my slang dictionary. They (wisely) split it into two sections. The first includes your understairs cupboard, and 19th century references to the Salvation Army and Irish prisons,  the second is best avoided.......


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 01/12/2011 : 04:55
I must lead a sheltered life. I shall ignore the modern usage.

Now then Dave, what about 'profundities'?


Stanley Challenger Graham




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stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
Tizer
VIP Member


5150 Posts
Posted - 01/12/2011 : 09:35
Are they your next Mystery Object?


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