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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted -  14/11/2010  :  06:41
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Stanley Challenger Graham




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stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk
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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 04/11/2011 : 09:08
Saw a shop lady having a quick drag outside this morning and nipping off the end as a customer went in the shop. We used to call fag ends 'dimps'. Was that just Stockport?


Stanley Challenger Graham




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Bradders
Senior Member


1880 Posts
Posted - 04/11/2011 : 11:07
"Strapping "...for lads and lasses

(stoppit !...)


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 05/11/2011 : 06:14
Don't understand that one Brad.....


Stanley Challenger Graham




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Bradders
Senior Member


1880 Posts
Posted - 05/11/2011 : 16:11
I was refering to sturdyness , not flagellation.....
( "by 'eck 'e were a strapping lad"....etc)


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Tizer
VIP Member


5150 Posts
Posted - 05/11/2011 : 16:24
Perhaps Bradders is harking back to `bonny' on the previous page...? That's the trouble with forums, posts leapfrog each other.


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Bradders
Senior Member


1880 Posts
Posted - 05/11/2011 : 22:47
Yes Peter, I was .... and the one from Belle just before it ...!


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 06/11/2011 : 04:48
Got it! How about 'strapping' for putting something on the slate?


Stanley Challenger Graham




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belle
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6502 Posts
Posted - 14/11/2011 : 10:50
I watched a perilous activity at the weekend and foudn myself saying "he could have come a right cropper!" so where does cropper come from in this context and is this phrase confined to northern counties?


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 15/11/2011 : 05:20
Belle, That's a complicated one! Webster has more definitions of 'crop' than you can poke a stick at. Apart from the connections with cutting, 'cropping hair', most likely from harvesting growing crops, there is the 'crop' or 'craw' in a birds neck where food is ground up by retained grit. Brewer says that it is connected with 'neck and crop' meaning altogether and that 'coming a cropper' is falling 'neck and crop'. The allusion being that you are in danger of breaking your neck. There is also the suggestion in my mind of a cropper being cut off short, that is stopped in your tracks. I think you can take your pick!


Stanley Challenger Graham




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belle
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6502 Posts
Posted - 15/11/2011 : 14:13
Yes I actaully began to think it might have some vague link to the grim reaper..in other words you are in peril of death..after all a scythe is definietly a "cropper"!


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Bradders
Senior Member


1880 Posts
Posted - 16/11/2011 : 19:30
Mum tells me that the coming Sunday is  known as  "Stir Sunday "..
She told me why ....

So a bit of a quiz .....Who else knows why ?

First to post a correct answer (according to Mum), gets a silver threppenny bit ...

Honest !

Edited by - Bradders on 16/11/2011 7:33:45 PM


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tripps
Senior Member


1404 Posts
Posted - 16/11/2011 : 20:29
Would that be anything to do with Christmas puddins?


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catgate
Senior Member


1764 Posts
Posted - 16/11/2011 : 20:53


quote:
belle wrote:
I watched a perilous activity at the weekend and foudn myself saying "he could have come a right cropper!" so where does cropper come from in this context and is this phrase confined to northern counties?

It is a derivative of the "hunting fraternity". The "crop" is the stick with which they beat the horse in order to force it over a fence it does not fancy. If they come unstuck from the exercise they might "break their neck and crop".


Every silver lining has a cloud.


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 17/11/2011 : 04:22
Had a furtle. I have always associated it with making the Christmas puddings but there may be an older derivation. In Anglican church the last Sunday before Advent was known as Stir Sunday because of the Collect for the day. "Stir up, we beseech thee, O Lord, the wills of thy faithful people; that they, plenteously bringing forth the fruit of good works, may of thee be plenteously rewarded; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen."


Stanley Challenger Graham




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marilyn
VIP Member


5007 Posts
Posted - 17/11/2011 : 05:55
I was out for a walk the other day, and passed an elderly gent watering his garden. As soon as I said Hello and heard his accent, aye by gum, I knew he had to be from somewhere near where I was born. Turns out he was from Barnsley. When I said I was from Barlick, he smiled and said..
"Aye, I know Barlick well. Used to push barrow up there often."
(push barrow? Is that physically pushing a barrow from Barnsley to Barlick? Or is that code for doing a pub crawl and getting stonking drunk? I daren't ask!)
The other interesting thing he said is that he spent many years singing in a pub in Bridlington. He is 'getting on' now, and would dearly love to sell his house, move back to Bridlington and live out his days on the money he gets from the house. Poor old love wants to die on English soil. Unfortunately, he doesn't think his health is good enough to make the flight! He sounded so darn homesick as he was talking.
I told him to follow his dream...
Why not? You only live once...
(some folk save all their lives for a rainy day, but fail to notice when it is raining)

Edited by - marilyn on 17/11/2011 05:57:14 AM


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