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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted -  22/06/2007  :  10:00
WE ARE WHAT WE EAT 2007

 I have shifted the intro to the body of the topic.


Stanley Challenger Graham




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stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk
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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 17/02/2011 : 06:04
Plans for the mega-dairy at Nocton Farm withdrawn due to environmental problems of contamination of the public water supply. I'm glad because I hate the concept but I'm realistic enough to recognise that the idea hasn't gone away.


Stanley Challenger Graham




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Posted - 17/02/2011 : 10:33
The sources for the saturated fats advice are organisations like the British Heart Foundation and American Heart Association. They have well paid executives who don't want to see an end to the gravy train.

The Nocton farmer fell into the `Monsato trap'. Trying to introduce something without researching what the local people and authorities might think, or even simply `trying it on' (think of Monsato assuming arrogantly that it could introduce GM crops and foods into Europe without checking what Europeans might feel about it).


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Posted - 04/03/2011 : 10:31
In the USA the Kellogg company has done a survey on consumer's understanding of fibre in food and found that many are confused and have completely wrong ideas about which foods contribute fibre to their diet. Nearly 20% of Americans incorrectly believe that meats, seafood, and dairy foods are a good source of fibre and nearly one in 10 even thinks water provides the fibre. Four out of five Americans surveyed say they make a conscious effort to include fibre in their diet and 80% believe they get enough. Yet, less than 10% actually get the recommended daily intake of fibre. I wonder if the British public understands fibre in food any better than the American?


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 05/03/2011 : 05:01
Doubtful Peter. Never, ever, understimate the public's capacity for making the assumption that if it's on the shelf it's good food. I firmly believe that we let our kids down when we educate them. Far more important to understand the basic facts of good diet than the dates of events in history or the role of the media....  But there you are, I'm peculiar and hopelessly out of touch!

The fact that it's Kellogg's who are promoting this information is significant. The food processors latch onto any 'health' issue that can help their sales. A big part of the problem.


Stanley Challenger Graham




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Posted - 05/03/2011 : 12:35
Yes. I'm normally more sceptical about `information' put out by the manufacturers and retailers but in this case I suspect it is close to the truth and it won't do any harm to prompt people to eat more fibre.


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 11/03/2011 : 05:36
I heard a report this morning on R4 that'researchers' have announced that people with fat round the midriff are no more prone to heart problems than the generally obese. Phew, what a relief!


Stanley Challenger Graham




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moh
Silver Surfer


6860 Posts
Posted - 11/03/2011 : 13:33
It is !!


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 15/05/2011 : 04:43
Heard a report on World Service about the use of Donkey's milk for babies. I think it was in Pakistan. Evidently a very good substitute and better than cow's milk. It reminded me of Moorside Dairy at Bradford where I used to deliver tanker milk. It was a farm as well and one thing I had noted was that there was always a donkey grazing with the milk herd. This was reckoned to be a protection against Contagious Abortion, commonly called Pick and later known as Brucellosis. One day when I went in I saw his donkey was dead, I told the owner and when I delivered the following day he had a fresh donkey!

I first saw cottage cheese made at Moorside and I was shocked. All they did was pour acid into a vat of skim milk from the separator, this curdled it, they drained the liquid off, washed the curd with water and that was it!


Stanley Challenger Graham




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Posted - 16/05/2011 : 10:37
Donkey's milk has been picked up by commercial interests who are promoting it like mad.


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Posted - 17/05/2011 : 10:15
UK national newspapers found to be unsatisfactory
(From the European Food Information Council, EUFIC, web site)

Dietary health claims made by UK newspapers are founded on insufficient evidence according to research published in the journal Public Understanding of Science.
 
Newspapers are an important part of the media in developed and developing countries and a source of information about nutrition and health for the public. They may therefore impact on the dietary choices and food-related health beliefs of their readers. Their dual objective is to entertain and inform. Media coverage of food and health is often determined by its novelty, controversy and consumer interest.
 
Cooper et al from King’s College and the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine analysed the top ten selling UK-wide newspapers for one, randomly selected week to identify the level of scientific quality of their claims. Two evidence grading scales, developed by the World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF) and the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN), were used to categorise the claims identified.
 
According to these two scales the study found 72% and 68% of 111 dietary health claims (assessed by WCRF and SIGN criteria respectively) did not meet the recommended levels of evidence for their substantiation. As most dietary health claims analysed had an insufficient evidence base, the study concludes there is widespread misreporting of dietary health advice by UK newspapers. This inaccurate reporting may contribute to public misconceptions about food and health.
 
The authors provide some recommendations for future research; using experts to assess the evidence base for each claim while blinded to their source, increasing the duration of the sampling period and investigating annual fluctuation, trends over time, the impact of major news items and systematic distortions in newspaper claims. Their approach could also be applied to non-dietary health claims and other media outlets.
 
Reference: Cooper B, Lee W, Goldacre B, Sanders, T. The quality of the evidence for dietary advice given in UK national newspapers. `Public Understanding of Science', 11 April 2011.


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 18/05/2011 : 06:38
All true. I wonder if the papers are listening?

News item this morning about 65,000 cases of campylobacter infection mostly from eating the 85million chickens we slaughtered last year. Looking at the figures the miracle is that there weren't more! Wouldn't 'overcooking' eliminate most of these cases?


Stanley Challenger Graham




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Posted - 18/05/2011 : 10:20
The FSA's own web page says: "Campylobacter is the most common cause of food poisoning in the UK and it was responsible for an estimated 321,000 cases in England and Wales alone in 2008, resulting in more than 15,000 hospitalisations, 76 deaths and an estimated cost to the economy of more than £583m. It is found mainly in poultry but also in red meat, unpasteurised milk and untreated water."

Adequate cooking will prevent many cases but there is also a danger from handling uncooked poultry and then cross-contaminating other foods (especially salads or already cooked foods) or directly infecting oneself or other people. It may not have been present in the poultry eaten by our ancestors and its prevalence now could be a result of the farming techniques used now. Handle chicken carefully - Campylobacter is not a a `mild tummy bug' that you can shrug off in a day or so. It's very nasty (I caught it in Indonesia in the 1980s and I was ill for weeks and stll have a weak stomach) and it can cause dangerous side-effects such as Guillan-Barre syndrome (paralysis creeps up your body from your legs into your chest and kills you in hours by paralysing the lungs if you don't get good hospital treatment immediately).


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 19/05/2011 : 05:59
A cheerful post! Why do I think of Edwina Currie? (Alright, that was salmonella but the same type of problem.)


Stanley Challenger Graham




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belle
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6502 Posts
Posted - 19/05/2011 : 10:03
Right that's the chicken crosed off the list...in my atempts to stay alive and less than unhealthy, wheat and oats have gone by the board...oh yes the digestive system likes this, due to my "thousands" of gall stones cheese, cream, chocolate are kept to a minimum..butter has had to go completely, but I think it won't be long till the others follow, due to my disc slipping in my jaw crunchy or chewy foods must be eaten sparingly, no bouts of toffee, nuts , chewing gum, or even excessive fruit eating...milk, ice cream etc blocks my nose and gives me sinus problems.. as we have read above my life is in danger with chicken and red meat...I can't eat cooked cabbage as it does something incredibly painfull to my lower intestine.... thinking wine needs to go as i have had probs with candida recently...though this could be the onslaught of diabetes which they are always trying to saddle me with , so will lay off sugar for a while....so that leaves me with...ah it's a good job I love the stuff...rice!

Edited by - belle on 19/05/2011 10:04:20 AM


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 20/05/2011 : 05:49
Porridge Belle. Only way to go!


Stanley Challenger Graham




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