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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted -  14/11/2010  :  06:41
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Stanley Challenger Graham




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stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk
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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 29/11/2010 : 06:54
Cathy Webster says it derives from Middle French 'gargouille', throat and used as a verb for gargling. Same root gives us 'gargoyles' on buildings because the water issues from their throats.


Stanley Challenger Graham




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belle
VIP Member


6502 Posts
Posted - 01/12/2010 : 23:20
I love the idea of "gargoyling" with water, now i know why they have that grimace on their faces!

Watching "I'm a celeb" (say nowt!) Ant got a splinter in his finger which Dec referred to as something like a skilt, know as a skelf in lowland Scots, what's the north of england equivalent?


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TOM PHILLIPS
Steeplejerk


4164 Posts
Posted - 01/12/2010 : 23:34
My g/mother called splinters "spells",and the irritating splits at the side of the finger nails she called "spep-mothers blessings".

The Gargoyle origins are interesting.


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Bradders
Senior Member


1880 Posts
Posted - 02/12/2010 : 00:32
TOM.....You're psychic, Mister, (or is that side-kick..! ?)

I was talking about "step-mother blessings" TODAY with a friend of mine in Bodmin.....(well it beats Politics !)

Spells were always (and still are) slivers  of wood that stab you and break off....

But Step-mother blessings are what I used to call those nasty  ,very thin stringy little bits of skin  that appear on the top of your fingures , just behind your fingure nails  . They are not sore to start with , but you know that they WILL BE , once you start to try and get rid of them..

But seeing as how you're a Steeplejack , I'll bow to your superior knowledge on the subject of Nailcare ....eh ! 



 

 


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 02/12/2010 : 06:48
Tom, spells with me as well. I have a 'Step-Mother's Blessing. on my right thumb, it's permanent and to stup it splitting I cut the thick skin back and put grease on it. The infection down the side of the finger in the bed is known to me as a 'Whitlow'.

http://hcd2.bupa.co.uk/fact_sheets/html/herpetic_whitlow.html


Stanley Challenger Graham




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stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
wendyf
Senior Member


1439 Posts
Posted - 03/12/2010 : 14:05
I've just got a copy from the LRO of an original list of tolls to be charged at the "Howshay Bar" Turnpike at Black Lane Ends. It is dated from 1773 and describes in great detail the different charges for wagons, carriages etc. The larger the size of your wheels, the cheaper the toll, presumably because with a narrow wheel you damaged the road and with a wide wheel you literally rolled it. There is much mention of parts of the wheel called  "fellies". Can anyone tell me what they are?
The wheel sizes mentioned go up to 16 inches, and if you had a cart with that size of wheel you got through free for the first few months of the turnpikes operation. There is also a category of carts with 9 inch wheels "rolling 16 inches". I wonder how that worked?


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catgate
Senior Member


1764 Posts
Posted - 03/12/2010 : 17:39
"fellies" are the curved sections of timber that are used to make up the rim of the wheel (into which the spokes are fixed) and on to which the iron rim is shrunk.


Every silver lining has a cloud.


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Bodger
Regular Member


892 Posts
Posted - 03/12/2010 : 20:11
I knew them as felloes ?


"You can only make as well as you can measure"
                           Joseph Whitworth
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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 04/12/2010 : 06:13
Catty and Bodge are both right Wendy. Felloes (or variants) spokes and the hub (always made of beech wood if they could get it) was called the nave. The 9" wheels running on 16" are most likely carrying stone, very broad wheels to spread the weight. Almost certainly solid wheels and quite often cast iron even in those days. I'd love to see a copy of the tolls. You're quite right about the narrow wheels. There was also often a prohibition against 'cogged' wheels, studs round the tyre to stop the wagon sliding sideways on steep cambers. Many early prints of medieval wagons show them having these wheels.


Stanley Challenger Graham




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stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
wendyf
Senior Member


1439 Posts
Posted - 04/12/2010 : 08:35
Thanks to you all, I understand now.
Stanley, it is quite a dark & mucky document, so I'm not sure how well it would photograph, if I can I'll put it on the site if the LRO are OK with that.
You are right about the bit about flat wheels. This notice covers the period from September 1773 to September 1776, after that the tolls were to double, and from Michaelmas 1776, "The tire of all carriages shall be countersunk, in placing the same upon the fellies in such a manner, that the nails shall not rise above the surface, and that the sole or surface of the wheels shall be quite flat."
Once I get a bit more info together I will put it all up on the site.


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belle
VIP Member


6502 Posts
Posted - 04/12/2010 : 08:38
Were they called "fellows" oringinally, I wonder?as in all going beside each other. like bed fellows?


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Cathy
Senior Member


4249 Posts
Posted - 04/12/2010 : 08:59

Step-mother blessings, haven't suffered from them, only from Step-mothers 'curse'  where the finger-tip skin splits (and can bleed) in winter, often needing plasters. 


All thru the fields and meadows gay  ....  Enjoy   
Take Care...Cathy Go to Top of Page
Bodger
Regular Member


892 Posts
Posted - 04/12/2010 : 09:26
Talking of cold weather, we used the word, nesh,(spelling ?) , to describe someone who compained about the cold, " goo on ya nesh b-gger"


"You can only make as well as you can measure"
                           Joseph Whitworth
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catgate
Senior Member


1764 Posts
Posted - 04/12/2010 : 14:03


quote:
Stanley wrote:
Catty and Bodge are both right Wendy. ......

...and please do we get a prize for that, sir?


Every silver lining has a cloud.


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 05/12/2010 : 05:16
One siver star apiece!  Felloe: Old English 'felge' no obvious connection Belle.

Fascinate. From Latin 'fascinum', evil spell or bwitchment. It caught my attention yesterday....


Stanley Challenger Graham




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