Visit the historic Lancashire Textile Project with over 500 photos and 190 taped interviews|2|0
Go to Page
  First Page  Previous Page    5  6  7  [8]  9  10   Next Page  Last Page
Author Previous Topic Topic Next Topic  
Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted -  14/11/2010  :  06:41
New version to make loading easier'

Old topic is HERE


Stanley Challenger Graham




Barlick View
stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk
Replies
Author
Go to Page
  First Page  Previous Page    5  6  7  [8]  9  10   Next Page  Last Page
 
Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 23/01/2011 : 06:00
See continuation topic for 'Red Biddy'.


Stanley Challenger Graham




Barlick View
stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
Cathy
Senior Member


4249 Posts
Posted - 23/01/2011 : 09:20
Old Biddy.  I think it refers to an old woman who is seen to also be nosey and possibly critical / interfering.   Old depends on your own perception, some 20yr olds think 50 is old. 


All thru the fields and meadows gay  ....  Enjoy   
Take Care...Cathy Go to Top of Page
Bodger
Regular Member


892 Posts
Posted - 23/01/2011 : 10:10
red biddy to me was a glass of Ozzie red wine in Yates wine Lodge Ashton u lyne. you could get a glass and a bowl of tater hash for two bob


"You can only make as well as you can measure"
                           Joseph Whitworth
  Go to Top of Page
Tizer
VIP Member


5150 Posts
Posted - 23/01/2011 : 10:40
If biddy means hen does the Geordie hinny come from hen too?

Bodge, Yates Wine Lodge was far more sophisticated than these downmarket Wetherspoon places we have now!


Go to Top of Page
tripps
Senior Member


1404 Posts
Posted - 23/01/2011 : 12:33
Yates Wine Lodge.  Remarkably little info on wikipedia.   I believe there was a sort of Victorian missionary aniti drink element to the business. Thus cheap food was sold on the premises to accompany the refreshment..  They also sold rather good tins of sardines. There were two branches in Oldham Street, Manchester, and I recall the measure for the strong Australian wine was a "dock".   There was a branch in most Northern towns, though the Oldham one is now defunct.  Like Wetherspoons today, it attracted the cheap booze specialist customer, but they cleverly closed 30 minutes before other pubs so there was no problem getting them to vacate the premises, to get the last one elsewhere. .  Each year on Founder's Day they sold at cost "Founder's Port"  for which there was a strong demand. I recall they sold draught champagne in the Blackpool branch. There was a similar business whose name I can't remember in Wigan. 
It all seems a long time ago now........Smile


Go to Top of Page
Bodger
Regular Member


892 Posts
Posted - 23/01/2011 : 13:30
Maybe not dialect but where does the word clinker, as in fused lumps in fireholes,and is there a connection to clinker built boats

Another word dross as in rubbish in coal


"You can only make as well as you can measure"
                           Joseph Whitworth
  Go to Top of Page
belle
VIP Member


6502 Posts
Posted - 23/01/2011 : 13:35
Tizer...I don't think Biddy does come from hen, hinny does I would say. Biddy is much more likely to be from the scots "Bidey in" meaning common law wife.


Life is what you make itGo to Top of Page
belle
VIP Member


6502 Posts
Posted - 23/01/2011 : 13:41
Don't know about clinker but I bet someone on here will


Just want to record for posterity that my 76 year old relative was talking about a piece of land called "intake" the other day, interestingly she said her father (from Skipton)and all around pronounced that "intuk" a shortened form of in- took i would think..so words in historical records may not sound like they read, and conversly many things changed in spelling as a result of how they were pronounced.


Life is what you make itGo to Top of Page
belle
VIP Member


6502 Posts
Posted - 23/01/2011 : 18:29
Just reading a historical document about Leeds and it mentions two well known phrases "Going for a Burton" and the "full Monty" attributing both to the Leeds Clothier Montague Burton....the first being a reference to a de mob suit, so when you left the forces you "went for a Burton" and the second meaning a suit with all the trimmings?


Life is what you make itGo to Top of Page
Sunray10
Regular Member


557 Posts
Posted - 23/01/2011 : 19:12
So with regards to the film 'The Full Monty'does that means going completely starkers but with the trimmings left hanging out.


R.Spencer. Go to Top of Page
tripps
Senior Member


1404 Posts
Posted - 23/01/2011 : 20:36
Problem with "gone for a Burton" is that demob suits were distributed post 1945, but  the phrase was in wide use amongst aircrew throughout the war.  Besides - the suits came from the stores, and I don't recall any of my issued stuff having designer labels in, just a broad arrow, so you wouldn't know who had made the suit.
We've looked at Full Monty before, and I find this to be one of the less convincing explanations.
I may of course be wrong on both counts, but "believe nothing you read, and only half of what you see is a good guide.


Go to Top of Page
Bodger
Regular Member


892 Posts
Posted - 23/01/2011 : 21:01
Watching BBC Country File, there was a guy using hunting birds Kestrel etc. he said "Rule of thumb" came from when they hold the bird in their hand by holding the strap between the thumb and finger, also "Hoodwink" was when the bird was hooded ?


"You can only make as well as you can measure"
                           Joseph Whitworth
  Go to Top of Page
catgate
Senior Member


1764 Posts
Posted - 23/01/2011 : 23:02


quote:
Bodger wrote:
Watching BBC Country File, there was a guy using hunting birds Kestrel etc. he said "Rule of thumb" came from when they hold the bird in their hand by holding the strap between the thumb and finger, also "Hoodwink" was when the bird was hooded ?

That is typical BBC.

Everyone knows that Rule of Thumb  was invented by Silas Marner when he wrote Christmas Carol by Dick Inns, and Hoodwink was what Robin gave Marion (amongst other things).


Every silver lining has a cloud.


Go to Top of Page
Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 24/01/2011 : 05:32
Full Monty usually taken to mean a suit complete with waistcoat, you could get a two piece without it.

Cinker as fused ash: Webster says it was first noted in 1645 and came from a Dutch word beaing slag or brick. Clinker in boat-building first noted in 1750, thought to be a corruption of 'clich' or 'clench' the act of turning the nail ends over on the inside of the hull over an internal washer to make them immoveable.

More derivations for rule of thumb than you could poke a stick at. I favour the fact that the top joint of the thumb, being fairly consistent in adults was used as a basis of measurement way back in the mists of time. See origins of cubit as well, I think that was the length of the forearm.


Stanley Challenger Graham




Barlick View
stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
wendyf
Senior Member


1439 Posts
Posted - 24/01/2011 : 07:32
I watched Countryfile last night Bodger, and it was the term "under the thumb" he was talking about. The leather thingy (jess?) fastened to the bird's leg is placed under the thumb to keep tight control.


Go to Top of Page
Topic is 40 Pages Long:
Go to Page
  First Page  Previous Page    5  6  7  [8]  9  10   Next Page  Last Page
 


Set us as your default homepage Bookmark us Privacy   Copyright 2004-2011 www.oneguyfrombarlick.co.uk All Rights Reserved. Design by: Frost SkyPortal.net Go To Top Of Page

Page load time - 0.578