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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted -  11/10/2011  :  15:24
Khaki in colour and sombre in content. "Cravens Part in the Great War", there will not have been many households in Barlick and what was then a much larger Craven Area, that did not have at least one copy of this book. In my immediate Family there would have been at least four and I still have two of them, albeit that one is with my son on Anglesey. Over the years I have seen them at jumble sales, in second hand shops and in piles of rubbish for disposal, even left behind when a house has been vacated. They will have turned up all over the place, I have come across them in Wales, the Isle of Wight and Hampshire, the two that I have belonged to my Father and Maternal Grandfather.
Many years ago I went through one of them from cover to cover noting those from Barlick who had given their lives in the service of King and Country, my notes are long gone so I am going to do it again, a few pages at a time, but this time I will include other local places within an approximate seven mile radius, Gisburn, Foulridge, Earby and so on. I will post my findings on here with the name, address and a precis of other details, as some are quite extensive, each name is to have the page number for my reference so that if anyone wants further information, I can soon find it. In a good number of cases there is a photograph, these I will copy and post in groups of ten at suitable intervals. In the book there are 391 pages so I will use a few abreviations hopefully all self explanatory, ie, KIA:- Killed in Action. MPD:- Missing presumed Dead. DOW:- Died as a result of Wounds, and one that is all too frequent, DFD:- Died from Disease or Illness.
One Man was responsible for the existance of these books and that was Mr, Walter Morrison Esq, JP of Malham Tarn who put forward the idea of the book and defrayed the entire cost.
There is quite a bit about the war itself up to page 50, including the Rohilla Tradgedy, then comes the dreadful list of those who did not come home, and so it is that on page 57 we find the first of Barlicks Sons, and is as follows:-

2nd Lieut Harry Thornton Pickles, 3rd Bn Duke of Wellington's (West Riding) Regiment (SR) second son of Mr Stephen Pickles JP, CC, Of Raysgill Barnoldswick KIA 26th April 1916 aged 26. P57.

In these first ten pages the extent of family loss is made very clear for it was in the Village of Carleton nr Skipton that this comes up:-

P53,  Lieut. Anthony E.K. Slingsby, 1/6th Duke of Wellington's (WR) Regiment, Son of Mr and Mrs J A Slingsby Carla Beck Carleton. KIA France 14th July 1915. Aged 26.
P57,  Captain Arthur Morris Slingsby, MC 56th Punjabi Rifles,  2nd son of Mr and Mrs J A Slingsby KIA 8th March 1916 in Mesopotamia. Aged 30.
P58.  Lieut. Stephen Slingsby of HMS Defence, 4th son of Mr and Mrs J A Slingsby. KIA in North Sea June 1916. Aged 24.
This out of a total of five sons all serving.
 
Lothersdale is the next local Village with on P62.  Lieut Alec Wilson, 1st Herefordshire Regiment, Son of Mr and Mrs F J Wilson JP of Lothersdale. KIA 26th March 1917 in Egypt.
P54, Lieut. The Hon, C. A. Lister Royal Marines, Hood Battalion, Only surviving son and heir of Lord Ribblesdale of Gisburne Park DOW 28th August 1915. Elder Brother killed in 1904 in Somaliland.
Greystones, Gisburn.  Lieut. George Proctor, Lancs Fusiliers, only son of Mr and Mrs Thomas Proctor. KIA 7th April 1918 aged 24. P70.
Marton is on P73, Which Marton is not clear,  2nd Lieut, Joseph Bryan Bushby South Staffs Regiment, son of Mr and Mrs Joseph Bushby, Schoolhouse Farm Marton, DOW, 4th October 1918 aged 26.



Ed

Edited by - thomo on 11/10/2011 4:05:43 PM


thomo
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panbiker
Senior Member


2301 Posts
Posted - 07/11/2011 : 20:12
Here we have the two lads I found today:

Pte Lewis Hartley - Duke of Wellingtons Regiment - 31st August 1918 Age 21

Sapper Stanley Derbyshire - Royal Engineers - 26th April 1915

Both were found in an area where I'm fairly sure three or four of us checked yesterday. You see something new everytime you look.

Having done this for a few years now and each year continue to find more of our fallen. It just makes you realise what a daunting job transcribing entire churchyards and cemeteries must be when taken on by local history societies and the like. I take my hat off to anyone or any organisation who untertakes such a task.


Ian Go to Top of Page
thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 07/11/2011 : 21:06
Good work Ian. I both of those names on my data files. Now for the last of the "W"s.


thomo Go to Top of Page
Chris CPGW
New Member


41 Posts
Posted - 08/11/2011 : 12:05
I've been doing a bit of research on the marriage of Wlfred  & Edith Anker. They were married in Skipton  between the months of Oct, Nov, Dec 1917  Edith's maiden name was O'conner. Is Edith buried at Ghyll ? and if so as anybody a photo of her headstone

Regards
Chris


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Callunna
Revolving Grey Blob


3044 Posts
Posted - 08/11/2011 : 13:24
And is she a relative of our glorious leader Doc?Go to Top of Page
thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 08/11/2011 : 15:12
There, that's the end of the second scan of the CPGW data, so that's once through the book and twice through the database, but, there is a lot to do yet, editing, cross referencing,  and formatting. As you see some of what is recorded several things become more clear. The letters home, sometimes appear rather more cheerful than one might expect, no doubt for the benefit of the recipient, stop them worrying perhaps. The letters written by the Officers to the bereaved are more gentile than those written by mates of the deceased, ie, " Poor Johny never felt a thing, took his head clean off"! It is also safe to asume that when reporters were putting together an article for the papers promoting the sympathy shown by families and friends , they had a list of suitable sentiments, which when you see them all published frequently repeat. News from the smaller communities tends to be lengthier than that from larger places and any religious sentiments indicate that the writers went to Church frequently.. Looking through all that is written is very moving and when undertaken in alphabetical order you see the impact on individual families where the losses appear one after the other. Back to work now, but I doubt wether I will have the next phase completed by the coming Sunday.


thomo Go to Top of Page
panbiker
Senior Member


2301 Posts
Posted - 08/11/2011 : 20:23


quote:
Chris CPGW wrote:
I've been doing a bit of research on the marriage of Wlfred  & Edith Anker. They were married in Skipton  between the months of Oct, Nov, Dec 1917  Edith's maiden name was O'conner. Is Edith buried at Ghyll ? and if so as anybody a photo of her headstone

Regards
Chris


Of course this is not definitive by any means but I have never seen a headstone at Ghyll with the name Anker. Various searches over the last few years have involved reading (albeit briefly) just about every headstone in the Churchyard and Cemetery. Could it be that Edith remarried? In which case she may be at Ghyll under her new married name or indeed may well have moved out of the district.

 


Ian Go to Top of Page
thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 08/11/2011 : 23:12
 I asume that she does not share Wilfreds plot then. But was there not some speculation about Him being in a shared plot?


thomo Go to Top of Page
panbiker
Senior Member


2301 Posts
Posted - 09/11/2011 : 00:38
The council record does not indicate a shared plot.

Assuming Edith was roughly the same age as Wilfred she was only a relatively young woman when widowed. With Chris's research into the marriage they had only been wed for less than a year. No children according to the newspaper report on Wilfreds death. I suppose if we could find the headstone, if the plot ever had one, and assuming it has been removed, that may reveal some further information.

I did speculate earlier, before we found him, about which family plot could he have been buried in. Wilfred and his family were originally from Bacup and at least his father survived him as well as his wife, according to the West Yorkshire Pioneer article. Of course his mother could be down at Ghyll but I have never come across a headstone.


Ian Go to Top of Page
Chris CPGW
New Member


41 Posts
Posted - 09/11/2011 : 01:14
From the Ancestry  marriage index records  1916-2005. I found a Edith Anker marrying  one Peter Morgan in Skipton  Oct-Nov-Dec 1919 I wonder if she is "our" Edith ?  Anker is not a common name and given the location of her marriage to Peter perhaps she is one in the same person.

Regards
Chris


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Callunna
Revolving Grey Blob


3044 Posts
Posted - 09/11/2011 : 01:19
Do the records indicate whether she was a spinster or widow?Go to Top of Page
Chris CPGW
New Member


41 Posts
Posted - 09/11/2011 : 01:54
Heather sadly not.. The register is  made up in this order. Names of person's married . District . Vol . Page

So in this case it would read

(Heading ) Marriages Registered in Oct Nov Dec 1919

Names of persons married .   District       Vol     Page

Anker
-Edith A       Morgan                  Skipton         9a      104

Regards

Chris





Edited by - Chris CPGW on 09/11/2011 8:26:35 PM


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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 09/11/2011 : 11:54
Surname: BRIDGE

Forename(s): Thomas Edward George

Place of Birth: Blackburn, Lancashire

Residence: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Service No: 31166

Rank: Private

Regiment/Corps/Service: East Lancashire Regiment

Battalion/Unit: 1st Battalion

Division: 34th Division

Age: 19

Date of Death: 1918-04-16

Awards: -----

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: Sp. Mem. B. 4.

CWGC Cemetery: BAILLEUL COMMUNAL CEMETERY EXTENSION (NORD)

CWGC Memorial: -----

Non-CWGC Burial: -----

Comments:

British Army WW1 Medal Rolls Index Cards: Pte Thomas E. G. Bridge, 31166, East Lancashire Regiment.

Brother of Ratcliffe Bridge (15511).

Craven's Part in the Great War Entry:

PRIVATE THOMAS BRIDGE, East Lancs. Regt., of 18, Lower West Street, Barnoldswick, killed in action 16th April, 1918.

 

West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record Entry:

BRIDGE, Thomas, aged 19 years, E. Lancs. Regt., 18, Lower West Avenue, [Barnoldswick], killed in action April 16, 1918.
Article Date: 17 May 1918
Private Thomas Bridge, Barnoldswick
Mr. and Mrs. William Bridge, 18 Lower West Avenue, Barnoldswick have lost a second son in the war by the death of Private Thos. Bridge East Lancs. Regiment who was killed on April 16th, five weeks after his arrival in France. He was only 19 years of age, and formerly employed by Messrs. Wm. Bailey Ltd., Wellhouse Mill. His brother, Private Ratcliffe Bridge, was killed on March 17th, while another brother has had three years service in France

On the evening of April 15th the Battalion were in support trenches on the Mont Noir- Bailleul Road... However, the troops in front retired and they became the front line. Exceptionally heavy bombardments of the 1st Battalion's positions took place on the 16th and 17th April.
[Thomas Edward George Bridge was killed on the 16th April 1918.]


thomo Go to Top of Page
thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 09/11/2011 : 11:56
Main CPGW Record

Surname: BROOKS

Forename(s): Harry Slater

Place of Birth: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Residence: -----

Service No: J/58684

Rank: Able-Seaman

Regiment/Corps/Service: Royal Navy

Battalion/Unit: H.M.S. 'Armadale Castle'

Division: not applicable - Royal Navy

Age: 23

Date of Death: 1918-10-21

Awards: -----

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: 28.

CWGC Cemetery: -----

CWGC Memorial: CHATHAM NAVAL MEMORIAL

Non-CWGC Burial: -----

Comments:

No entry in SD - Navy.

1901 Barnoldswick Census: Harry S. Brooks, aged 5 years, born Barnoldswick, Yorkshire, son of Robinson and Eliz. Brooks.

Craven's Part in the Great War Entry:

ABLE SEAMAN HARRY BROOKS, R.N., son of Mr. and Mrs. Robinson Brooks, Westfield, Barnoldswick, died at sea from influenza 21st Oct., 1918. Aged 23 years.

West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record Entry:

BROOK, Harry Slater, aged 23, A.B., R.N., Westfield, [Barnoldswick], died from influenza Oct. 21, 1918

Article Date: 01 November 1918
BARNOLDSWICK - THE WAR'S TOLL: Seaman's Death from Influenza
Mr. and Mrs. Robinson Brooks, Westfield, Barnoldswick, received official news last weekend that their second son, Able-Seaman Harry Slater Brooks, R.N., had died at sea from influenza on October 21st. For some time past he had been serving aboard an auxiliary cruiser engaged in escorting American troops, and at the time of his death was on a voyage to West Africa. He was 23 years of age, and prior to joining the Navy in March 1916, was associated with his father in the manufacturing business at Westfield Mill.


thomo Go to Top of Page
thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 09/11/2011 : 12:01
Main CPGW Record

Surname: BROOKS

Forename(s): Robert

Place of Birth: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Residence: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Service No: 12445

Rank: Private

Regiment/Corps/Service: Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment)

Battalion/Unit: 8th (Service) Battalion

Division: 11th (Northern) Division

Age: 18

Date of Death: 1915-08-02

Awards: -----

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: Panel 117 to 119.

CWGC Cemetery: -----

CWGC Memorial: HELLES MEMORIAL

Non-CWGC Burial: -----

Comments:

-----

 

 

Craven's Part in the Great War Entry:

PRIVATE ROBERT BROOKS, Duke of Well.'s Regt., son of Mr. & Mrs. Thomas Brooks, Lane Bottom, Barnoldswick, officially reported killed 2nd August, 1915, in Gallipoli. Aged 18 years.

 

West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record Entry:

BROOKS, Robert, aged 18 years, Duke of Wellington's Regiment, son of Mr. and Mrs. Brooks, Lane Bottom, [Barnoldswick], presumed dead, Gallipoli, Aug. 2, 1915.

Article Date: 29 October 1915
BARNOLDSWICK MEN WOUNDED AND MISSING
Considerable anxiety is felt as to the fate of two Barnoldswick men belonging to the 8th Battalion Duke of Wellington's in the Dardanelles. Pte. Thos. Hargreaves, son of Mr. and Mrs. Hargreaves, Gisburn Road, and Pte. Robt. Brooks, Lane Bottom. The former was first reported wounded about a month ago, and now missing, all efforts to trace him having proved futile, though it is possible that owing to discrepancy of regimental numbers in replies received by his parents from the York Record Office that some mistake has arisen. In the case of Pte. Brooks no official notice has been received from the War Office, though the fact that nothing has been heard of him for over three months is regarded as significant. The last letter sent to him was returned (Oct. 15) endorsed 'Wounded, present location uncertain'. In both cases several parcels sent from home have not as yet been acknowledged. Mr. and Mrs. Brook's two elder sons are serving with the army in France, one in the firing line and other in the A.S.C

Information was received on Sunday that Pte. Darby Kirrane, King's Own Royal Lancaster Regiment, whose home is at 27, Colin Street, Barnoldswick, had been wounded in France and is now in hospital at Cambridge. He has been severely crushed through being buried in a broken trench blown in by a shell, and was not rescued until an hour and a half afterwards. Kirrane, who is 19 years of age, is a brother-in-law of Pte. Thomas E. Heyworth, of the same regiment, who recently had his arm amputated. His mother and sister went to Cambridge to see him on Tuesday

Mr. and Mrs. Brooks' two elder sons are serving with the army in France, one in the firing line and the other in the A.S.C.

Article Date: 28 July 1916
BARNOLDSWICK CASUALTY LIST
Private Thos. Brooks, 2nd Duke of Wellington's, is in hospital at Fazackerley, Liverpool, with a serious shell wound in the knee. He is one of three soldier sons of Mrs. Thos. Brooks, Lane Bottom. His mother visited him last week and found him progressing favourably. Pte. Brooks related how, when his company were lying down to rest, a shell exploded amongst them, killing two officers and seven men, and wounding most of the others. Using his rifle as a crutch he managed to walk back to the dressing station, a distance of two miles. Pte. Robert Brooks, 8th Duke's, was wounded in the Dardanelles last August, and nothing has been heard of him since. It is thought he is a prisoner in Turkey. Another son (Willie) is in France.

Article Date: 08 June 1917
BARNOLDSWICK - AFTER NEARLY TWO YEARS
Private Robert Brooks, Duke of Wellington's, has just been reported missing since August 3rd, 1915 in Gallipoli, this being the first intimation. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Thos. Brooks, Lane Bottom, Barnoldswick, who have another son recently discharged from the Army owing to wounds received in France.

Article Date: 14 September 1917
BARNOLDSWICK
AFTER TWO YEARS - Missing Soldier's Death Presumed
The War Council have sent to Mr. and Mrs. Thos. Brooks, Lane Bottom, Barnoldswick, an official intimation presuming the death of their youngest son, Pte. Robert Brooks, Duke of Wellington's Regiment, who has been missing since August 2, 1915, in Gallipoli. Though nothing had been heard of him since that date, when several other Barnoldswick and Earby lads were last seen, Pte. Brooks was not officially reported missing until about three months ago. He enlisted at the age of 17, and was only one year older at the time of his supposed death. One of his brothers has been discharged from the army with a bullet wound in the knee received during the battle of the Somme last year, and another is still serving in France with the Motor Transport


thomo Go to Top of Page
thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 09/11/2011 : 13:15
Is nothing sacred? Once again that band of overpaid posturing self indulgent pratts (football) are headline grabbing for their own ends, and this time it involves that symbol of remembrance that flourishes at this time of the year, The Poppy. "We cannot wear it as it may upset the Germans" is what I have just read, "Well stuff my tall hat"!!! Down at Ghyll on Sunday last an observance was made about certain groups who do not subscribe to this annual event either, but they at least do not go public about it. Ah well there's nowt like a good rant I suppose, I feel better now! Wearing a poppy or showing that you appreciate the sacrifice given is not compulsory,  Its just another of those things that we do because thats how we are, anyone who does otherwise or does not agree with it could at least have the decency to keep quiet about it.


thomo Go to Top of Page
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