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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted -  22/06/2007  :  10:00
WE ARE WHAT WE EAT 2007

 I have shifted the intro to the body of the topic.


Stanley Challenger Graham




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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 30/03/2009 : 17:09
Lots of interest in the balance between Omega 3 and 6 fats. I've ordered a book, 'The Queen of Fats' and will be coming back to this when I have had a furtle. I knew it was important but the researchers are beginning to suspect that it is this imbalance that could be causing the rise in mental problems.


Stanley Challenger Graham




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Tizer
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Posted - 31/03/2009 : 11:05
I'll be interested to hear your views on the book and its author, Susan Allport. Scientists have been trying to get over the message about the importance of the ratio of omega-3 to omega-6 in the diet for 10-20 years now (and about omega-3 itself for about 30 years) but it's been an uphill struggle. Allport is a writer, not a scientist, and perhaps she will be able to do a better job of publicising the issue. But watch out if she tells you that you can get all the omega-3 you need from vegetable sources instead of fish - there are different types of omega-3 (nothing is ever simple!) and the veg type is much less effective.


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 31/03/2009 : 13:12
I had a look at her PR website and she does mention long-chain Omega 3 which is a good start. I shall report back......


Stanley Challenger Graham




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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 31/03/2009 : 13:13
PS. What triggered me was the last two episodes of the Food Programme. Try the last one on Listen Again on BBC.co.uk.


Stanley Challenger Graham




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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 20/06/2009 : 07:34
I was alerted to this. Probably worth a look if you are into diet pills.

http://www.lawyersandsettlements.com/features/hydroxycut-recall-iovate-health-sciences.html


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Cathy
Senior Member


4249 Posts
Posted - 20/06/2009 : 09:44
A few years ago a friend of mine had been taking F**d Diet Pills for a short period of time, and developed pains in her chest.  She took herself off to see her doctor and he informed her that if she had taken 1 more pill, she would have had a heart attack.  Nasty. 


All thru the fields and meadows gay  ....  Enjoy   
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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 21/06/2009 : 09:44
Cathy, glad your friend found out in time. The bottom line is that there is no easy way of losing weight. Ask Nolic!


Stanley Challenger Graham




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Posted - 18/01/2010 : 20:15
The concerns that saturated fat in the diet may cause coronary heart disease (the `Lipid Hypothesis') seem to have distracted from studies which suggest that the fat may protect us against stroke. A new journal article written by the highly respected nutrition scientist Dr John Stanley (Oxford University) now examines the five studies done on the association between saturated fat in the diet and stroke and finds that four implied a protective effect and the fifth showed no association. He says that the implication that total fat and saturated fat protect against stroke blows a very large hole in the Lipid Hypothesis and raises the possibility that coronary heart disease risk and stroke risk might respond differently to diet.

Also, "There is no sign of any supporters of the Lipid Hypothesis even acknowledging the existence of this evidence let alone trying to account for it. Given the impact of stroke on public health, particularly women's health, this seems very short sighted". He also draws attention to the failure of most studies to distinguish between strokes due to clotting and those due to bleeding, and between stroke risk in men and risk in women (Lipid Technology, 2009, Vol.21, No.11/12, pages 266-268).

This could be another case of throwing the baby out with the bath water. The claims about saturated fat and heart disease which started many years ago caused a dramatic reduction in the amount of milk consumed and a switch to skimmed milk but this removed beneficial components of milk fat from many people's diets. There is no doubt that consuming very large quantities of fat, and especially saturated fat, is likely to increase risk of heart disease but that does not mean that people should be encouraged to remove such fats from their meals completely.


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 19/01/2010 : 06:12
Exactly the conclusion that Susan Allport reached in 'Queen of Fats'. Further, she found evidence that seemed to suggest that one of the main drivers behind the substitution of processed vegetable fats for natural saturated fats was the food technology industry who wanted the advantages of longer shelf life in their products plus the fact that the saturated fat market was sewn up and they couldn't get any more profit out of it. The switch to modified vegetable oils opened up a whole new industry and enhanced profits. Look in any supermarket at the range of artificial spreads versus brands of butter and you can see one the results.

I think there is also the modern syndrome of using fear in advertising, the ultimate negative advertising is to tell you that the competitors product will kill you. That's what they did in effect for the natural fats, frightened people to death, literally, because there is a strong suspicion that the 'Western disease' phenomenon is directly linked to increased consuption of  modified vegetable fats. There is also the massive mistake made by government in the 1950s when instead of pursuing the wartime strategy of encouraging diversity and purity in food which gave us 'the last healthy generation' they went for quantity to get rid of rationing. Government food policy for the next thirty years was to encourage agriculture and the food processors to go for quantity. With hindsight this was a terrible mistake and only now are we beginning to realise the damage to the food chain this caused.  End of lecture!


Stanley Challenger Graham




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belle
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6502 Posts
Posted - 19/01/2010 : 10:31
What seems to be a contributory factor to all this nutrition confusion is the way medecine goes about things, when I had my last child there were all sorts of complications through the pregnancy and they were keen for me not to go overdue, but as this was my fourth and I had cooked them all for a least a week longer than the recommended time and they had turned out fine, i was not in any hurry to put my baby or myself through the trauma of an induced labour, so we came to an agreement that my baby would have it's heartbeat monitored every day, and if it showed the least sign of distress, i would aquiesce. They had just brought out a new super duper monitor for just this purpose and I went up to the hospital every day and was strapped on for an hour...there was only one problem ..they didn't really understand what the readouts were telling them so every day I had to go through the rigmarole of the doctors showing alarm, whilst the midwives just thought  the baby might be asleep, being strapped on for another hour, then a senior doctor called who agreed with the midwives and on it went...i managed to avoid all their hysteria and had the baby a week later quite happily and normally with no fuss.
The point I am making is that I am an overweight, sedentry female, who eats all sorts of wrong foods like chocolate etc and my cholesterol is and has been whenever it was tested, perfectly normal, and others I know are skinny fat free exercise freaks and their cholesterol shows up as a problem on the same tests.... could it just be we are born with a cholesterol type? The more we know the more ridiculous some of our assumptions are.


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Tizer
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5150 Posts
Posted - 19/01/2010 : 12:28
Very high blood cholesterol is genetically determined, at lower levels it is a balance between intake in the diet, synthesis in the liver and elimination from the body as bile salts. But even that is a simplification because it is also influenced by the relative activities of the lipoproteins which carry it about in the blood (HDL, LDL, VLDL - high, low, and very-low density lipoproteins). Very high blood cholesterol is undoubtedly a serious factor in heart disease risk but the evidence for it's effects at lower levels is less convincing.

All the interest in fats, cholesterol and heart disease arose 40 or more years ago when heart disease was such a great problem especially in men who were dying young. I sometimes wonder whether the real reason for many of those heart disease deaths was the lack of vitamin D due to the smog that was so common until end of the 1950s. Vitamin D is now known to be involved in protecting against heart disease, but we didn't know then - we thought it was just `good for bones'.


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5150 Posts
Posted - 07/02/2010 : 11:31
Seeing details of a conference in London later this year on omega-3 oils brought back memories of attending a lecture in the 1970s by Professor Hugh Sinclair who played a major role in raising our awareness of the importance in the diet of these and other polyunsaturated fatty acids. Born on 4th February one hundred years ago, Sinclair was an interesting character as well as a prominent scientist. For instance, the British Atherosclerosis Society (BAS) says: "He enjoyed fine wines, fast cars, and was an astute collector of rare and historical medical texts. He never achieved his ambition of a Chair at the University of Oxford, not because of lack of talent, but because of his inability to bow to authority. He was a scientific prophet before his time, but his wayward manner and driving ambition made him difficult to work with."

He is probably best known for embarking on an Eskimo diet of seal, fish and shellfish to proved the effects of omega-3 oils on the human body. The BAS says: "Having first examined the diet of Eskimos in the early 1950s and noted their remarkably low incidence of ischaemic heart disease despite a diet consisting almost entirely of fish and seal meat, he visited Greenland in 1976 (at the age of 66) to confirm their plasma lipid profile, and in 1979 embarked on the most notorious of several nutrional self-experiments, eating only seal and fish for 100 days, measuring changes in his plasma lipids and recording the extreme prolongation of his bleeding time."

I've put a couple of links below where you can find out more about him and his research. The Wikipedia page gets a bit deep in science and I suggest you skip that and read the more interesting bits!

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1279687/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hugh_Macdonald_Sinclair


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 07/02/2010 : 16:32
He figures largly in 'Queen of Fats' by Susan Allport. Mind you, she did her research well, there aren't many lipid men and women who don't get a mention!


Stanley Challenger Graham




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Posted - 08/02/2010 : 12:41
That London conference has interesting aims:

"...to open up the full potential for prevention and therapeutic applications of marine omega-3 fatty acids. With brain disorders having already overtaken all other burdens of ill health combined, the threat posed is possibly greater and definitely more imminent than the longer term threat of global climate change. Indeed the two are related. Proper cleaning and management of rivers, estuaries and coastal waters could restore and enhance CO2 and nitrogen fixation and simultaneously provide more DHA and omega-3 rich foods to help address the present, sinister climb in brain disorders and mental-ill health."

The conference is also a celebration of Professor Michael Crawford (remember his article I sent you Stanley?). One of the big concerns is that brain development is very much affected by the mother's diet during pregnancy and even before conception and not enough attention is paid to this.


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 08/02/2010 : 17:07
Yup, I remember. It seems to me that momentum is building up here, Allport mentions the danger and one wonders whether this could be as serious as some suggest. I bought another bottle of CLO today....


Stanley Challenger Graham




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