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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted -  11/10/2011  :  15:24
Khaki in colour and sombre in content. "Cravens Part in the Great War", there will not have been many households in Barlick and what was then a much larger Craven Area, that did not have at least one copy of this book. In my immediate Family there would have been at least four and I still have two of them, albeit that one is with my son on Anglesey. Over the years I have seen them at jumble sales, in second hand shops and in piles of rubbish for disposal, even left behind when a house has been vacated. They will have turned up all over the place, I have come across them in Wales, the Isle of Wight and Hampshire, the two that I have belonged to my Father and Maternal Grandfather.
Many years ago I went through one of them from cover to cover noting those from Barlick who had given their lives in the service of King and Country, my notes are long gone so I am going to do it again, a few pages at a time, but this time I will include other local places within an approximate seven mile radius, Gisburn, Foulridge, Earby and so on. I will post my findings on here with the name, address and a precis of other details, as some are quite extensive, each name is to have the page number for my reference so that if anyone wants further information, I can soon find it. In a good number of cases there is a photograph, these I will copy and post in groups of ten at suitable intervals. In the book there are 391 pages so I will use a few abreviations hopefully all self explanatory, ie, KIA:- Killed in Action. MPD:- Missing presumed Dead. DOW:- Died as a result of Wounds, and one that is all too frequent, DFD:- Died from Disease or Illness.
One Man was responsible for the existance of these books and that was Mr, Walter Morrison Esq, JP of Malham Tarn who put forward the idea of the book and defrayed the entire cost.
There is quite a bit about the war itself up to page 50, including the Rohilla Tradgedy, then comes the dreadful list of those who did not come home, and so it is that on page 57 we find the first of Barlicks Sons, and is as follows:-

2nd Lieut Harry Thornton Pickles, 3rd Bn Duke of Wellington's (West Riding) Regiment (SR) second son of Mr Stephen Pickles JP, CC, Of Raysgill Barnoldswick KIA 26th April 1916 aged 26. P57.

In these first ten pages the extent of family loss is made very clear for it was in the Village of Carleton nr Skipton that this comes up:-

P53,  Lieut. Anthony E.K. Slingsby, 1/6th Duke of Wellington's (WR) Regiment, Son of Mr and Mrs J A Slingsby Carla Beck Carleton. KIA France 14th July 1915. Aged 26.
P57,  Captain Arthur Morris Slingsby, MC 56th Punjabi Rifles,  2nd son of Mr and Mrs J A Slingsby KIA 8th March 1916 in Mesopotamia. Aged 30.
P58.  Lieut. Stephen Slingsby of HMS Defence, 4th son of Mr and Mrs J A Slingsby. KIA in North Sea June 1916. Aged 24.
This out of a total of five sons all serving.
 
Lothersdale is the next local Village with on P62.  Lieut Alec Wilson, 1st Herefordshire Regiment, Son of Mr and Mrs F J Wilson JP of Lothersdale. KIA 26th March 1917 in Egypt.
P54, Lieut. The Hon, C. A. Lister Royal Marines, Hood Battalion, Only surviving son and heir of Lord Ribblesdale of Gisburne Park DOW 28th August 1915. Elder Brother killed in 1904 in Somaliland.
Greystones, Gisburn.  Lieut. George Proctor, Lancs Fusiliers, only son of Mr and Mrs Thomas Proctor. KIA 7th April 1918 aged 24. P70.
Marton is on P73, Which Marton is not clear,  2nd Lieut, Joseph Bryan Bushby South Staffs Regiment, son of Mr and Mrs Joseph Bushby, Schoolhouse Farm Marton, DOW, 4th October 1918 aged 26.



Ed

Edited by - thomo on 11/10/2011 4:05:43 PM


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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 20/12/2011 : 09:30
Surname: PICKLES

Forename(s): Harry Thornton

Place of Birth: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Residence: -----

Service No: -----

Rank: T/2nd Lieutenant

Regiment/Corps/Service: Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment)

Battalion/Unit: 9th (Service) Battalion

Division: 17th (Northern) Division

Age: 26

Date of Death: 1916-04-26

Awards: -----

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: IX. G. 28.

CWGC Cemetery: CITE BONJEAN MILITARY CEMETERY, ARMENTIERES

CWGC Memorial: -----

Non-CWGC Burial: -----

Comments:

1901 Barnoldswick Census: Colne Road - Harry T. Pickles, aged 11 years, born Barnoldswick, son of Stephen and Sarah C. Pickles.

 

Craven's Part in the Great War Entry:

2ND LIEUT. HARRY THORNTON PICKLES, 3rd Bn, Duke of Wellington's (West Riding) Regiment (S.R.). second son of Mr. Stephen Pickles, J.P., C.C., of Raysgill, Barnoldswick, was killed in action on April 26th, 1916. He was 26 years of age. Lieut. Pickles joined the army in September, 1914, enlisting as a private in the 10th Duke of Wellington's Regt. After a period of training at Frensham Camp, he was promoted to the rank of 2nd Lieut. and transferred to the 3rd Res. Bn. at North Shields. He was drafted out to France in January, 1916. Educated at Silcoates School, near Wakefield, where he spent five years, leaving at the age of 17, he went to Victoria University, Manchester, taking his B.A. degree with honours before the age of 20. The M.A. degree was conferred upon him the following year. He was married at Lewisham the week before leaving England, his bride being Miss Ada Heuf, of New Eltham, Kent.

 

West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record Entry:

PICKLES, Second Lieutenant Harry Thornton, aged 26 years, Duke of Wellington's Regiment, second son of Mr. Stephen Pickles, J.P., C.C., Raygill, [Barnoldswick], killed in action in France, April 26, 1916.

rticle Date: 05 May 1916
BARNOLDSWICK OFFICER KILLED IN ACTION
The sad news was received on Sunday morning, in a telegram from the War Office, of the death of Second Lieut Harry Thornton Pickles, second son of Mr. Stephen Pickles, J.P., C.C., cotton manufacturer of Raygill, Barnoldswick, who was killed in action on April 26th. He was 26 years of age. A young man of exceptional talents, with every prospect of a brilliant future, he responded to the call of his country by joining the Army in September, 1914, enlisting as a private in the 10th Battalion Duke of Wellington's West Riding Regiment. After a period of training at Frensham Camp he was promoted to the rank of Second Lieutenant and transferred to the 3rd Reserve Battalion at North Shields, where he was given a position of responsibility in training and organising the despatch of troops to the Front. He was drafted out to France in January and after a brief training in grenade throwing was given charge of a Battalion. He was married at Lewisham the week before leaving England. The bride being Miss Ada Heuf, of New Eltham, Kent. On Saturday last his parents received from him a cheerful letter dated April 25th, one day before his death, saying he was quite well and feeling very fit.
Second-Lieut. Pickles was educated at Silcoates School, near Wakefield, where he spent five years, leaving at the age of 17 with all the scholarships the school had to confer. He then went to Victoria University, Manchester, where, during his six years' stay, due to diligent study he carried all before him, taking his B.A. degree with honours before the age of 20. The M.A. degree was conferred upon him the following year. Six years ago he began to study for the law, and was articled to Messrs. Goulty and Goodfellow, solicitors, Manchester. Early in 1914 he obtained the University degree of LL.B. While at Manchester Mr. Pickles maintained a keen interest in sport, playing with the Varsity Soccer team, of which he was captain in 1911-12. In his final examination as a solicitor he topped the list, being the only competitor who passed with first-class honours, and secured the "Stephen Heelis prize for Manchester and Salford Students" in the form of a large gold medal awarded by the Manchester Law Society.
An estimate of his intellectual attainments may be formed from the fact that shortly after leaving the University the authorities selected him from amongst a large number of applicants for a vacant lectureship in English Law and Jurisprudence, which he was to have commenced with the winter term of 1914, but which he was destined never to occupy owing to the outbreak of war and the more insistent call of patriotism.
A letter received on Wednesday morning from Pte. James Mudd, another Barnoldswick man in the same Battalion, states that Lieut. Pickles was killed by concussion from a bursting shell whilst going through the trenches to see that his men were all right. A bombardment from the enemy's heavy guns, lasting nearly three hours, was in progress at the time. Pte. Mudd adds that Lieut. Pickles was not struck by the projectile nor disfigured in any way, and that had he stuck to his dugout he would doubtless have come through scathless.

Article Date: 05 May 1916
PICKLES - April 26th, killed in action in France, Second Lieutenant Harry Thornton Pickles, 10th West Ridings, son of Mr. S. Pickles, Raygill House, Barnoldswick, aged 26.

Article Date: 12 May 1916
SKIPTON PETTY SESSIONS - THE LATE LIEUTENANT PICKLES
Prior to the commencement of business, the Chairman said once again he had to stand there to offer the condolence of the Bench to one of its members on the death of a gallant son - Mr. Stephen Pickles having lost his son in action. He was a young man of very great promise who had already had a brilliant career at the University, and whose life appeared to offer very great prospects of success. The Bench sincerely sympathised with the parents in the loss they had sustained.

Article Date: 04 July 1919
PEACE SUPPLEMENT TO THE 'CRAVEN HERALD' - CRAVEN'S FALLEN OFFICERS: SECOND-LIEUTENANT H. T. PICKLES
3rd Reserve Battalion Duke of Wellington's Regiment, son of Mr. Stephen Pickles, J.P., C.C., Raysgill, Barnoldswick. Killed in action April 26th, 1916, aged 26 years.

 

 

Article Date: 19 March 1915
BARNOLDSWICK NEWS
Friends of Mr. Harry Thornton Pickles, M.A., L.L.B., son of Mr. Stephen Pickles, C.C., and formerly lecturer in English law and jurisprudence at Manchester University, who joined Kitchener's Army as a private soon after the outbreak of war, will be pleased to learn that on March 18th he was gazetted a Second Lieutenant and was posted to the 'D' Company, 10th Battalion Duke of Wellington's West Riding Regiment. Up to that date he remained in the same regiment as a private. He is now reported to Bedford for two or three week's training.

Article Date: 12 May 1916
AN EARBY SOLDIER KILLED
A letter received from an Earby comrade last weekend conveyed the sad news that another Earby soldier, belonging the 9th Battalion Duke of Wellington's Regiment, had been killed in action. The letter ran as follows:-
May 4th, 1916.
"You must excuse me not writing before. We have been having a rough time of it lately. We lost about 100 last week. No doubt you will have heard about J. Walsh getting killed, and Lieut. Pickles (son of Mr. S. Pickles of Barnoldswick, whose death was reported last week) who used to be with our Allan. Well, dear mother, we went to see the graves of the boys we had lost last night. We are now out for a rest. It is a grand place where they are buried; Walsh and Lieut. Pickles are laid side by side. You must tell Mrs. Walsh I am getting some flowers to put on their graves, and shall see they are all right every time I come out of the trenches. Jim had not been with us long, but he was liked by all the Company. It was a blow to me when I got to know."
Private James Walsh (9th Duke of Wellington's), official notification of whose death has since been received, was the eldest son of Mr. Thos. Walsh, 79, Colne Road, Earby. He was 25 years of age, and unmarried. Originally attached to the Dardanelles Expedition, he was wounded at the Suvla Bay landing last summer, and after recovering spent four weeks at home before going to France two months ago. He was for several years a member of the Earby Brass Band.


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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 20/12/2011 : 09:31
Surname: PICKLES

Forename(s): John Thomas

Place of Birth: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Residence: -----

Service No: M/10089

Rank: Senior Reserve Attendant

Regiment/Corps/Service: Royal Naval Auxiliary Sick Berth Reserve

Battalion/Unit: H.M.H.S. 'Rohilla'

Division: not applicable - Royal Navy

Age: 34

Date of Death: 1914-10-30

Awards: -----

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: 8.

CWGC Cemetery: -----

CWGC Memorial: CHATHAM NAVAL MEMORIAL

Non-CWGC Burial: -----

Comments:

No entry in SD - Navy.

1911 Barnoldswick Census: 3, Clifford Street - John Thomas Pickles, aged 30 years, born Barnoldswick, husband of Ann Elizabeth Pickles.
Brother of George Pickles (11596).

Craven's Part in the Great War Entry:

PTE. J.T. PICKLES, Federation St., Barnoldswick, married, one child.

West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record Entry:

PICKLES, J.T., Federation Street, [Barnoldswick], married, one child. The above resided at Barnoldswick, being a member of the local branch of the St. John Ambulance Association, who were drowned when the 'Rohilla', a hospital ship on which they were serving as members of the Naval Sick Berth Reserve, went ashore at Whitby on October 30, 1914.


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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 20/12/2011 : 09:32
Surname: PICKLES

Forename(s): John

Place of Birth: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Residence: -----

Service No: 18902

Rank: Private

Regiment/Corps/Service: East Yorkshire Regiment

Battalion/Unit: 10th (Service) Battalion. (1st Hull)

Division: 31st Division

Age: 24

Date of Death: 1917-05-03

Awards: -----

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: Bay 4 and 5.

CWGC Cemetery: -----

CWGC Memorial: ARRAS MEMORIAL

Non-CWGC Burial: -----

Comments:

Brother of Edmondson Pickles (93697).

1901 Barnoldswick Census: Clough Fold - John Pickles, aged 7 years, born Barnoldswick, son of Louisa Pickles, widow.

The informal title of the 10th (Service) Bn East Yorkshire Regiment was the Hull Commercials.

Craven's Part in the Great War Entry:

PRIVATE JOHN PICKLES, East Yorks. Regt., of 8, Stewart Street, Barnoldswick, presumed killed in action 3rd May, 1917. Aged 24 years.

West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record Entry:

PICKLES, John, aged 24 years, [Barnoldswick], East Yorkshire Regiment, son of the late Mr. Edmondson Pickles, killed May 3, 1917.

Article Date: 19 October 1917
BARNOLDSWICK CASUALTIES - MISSING SINCE MAY
The War Office has notified the relatives of Private John Pickles, East Yorks. Regiment, who was reported missing on May 3rd, that he is presumed to have been killed in action on that date. He was 24 years of age, single, and a son of the late Mr. Edmondson Pickles. At the time of enlistment he lived at 8, Stuart Street, and was a twister employed by Messrs. G. D. Brown, Crow Nest. He went to France in September last year.

Article Date: 19 October 1917
PICKLES - Missing since May 3rd 1917, and now presumed killed on that date, Private John Pickles, East Yorks. Regiment, son of Mr. Edmondson Pickles, Barnoldswick, aged 24 years

Article Date: 20 August 1920
BARNOLDSWICK SOLDIER'S DEATH IN MESOPOTAMIA
The death occurred on August 7th, in Mesopotamia, of Private Edmondson Pickles, Northumberland Fusiliers, from heart failure. The sad news was conveyed in a letter from the War Office to his relatives in Barnoldswick last week end. Private Pickles, who would have been 20 years of age next month, was a son of the late Mr. Edmondson Pickles. He enlisted a year ago, and went out to join the Mesopotamian Expeditionary Force at Basra six weeks before Christmas. In a letter to his sister, received the Thursday before his death, he stated that he was in the best of health, having had a successful recovery from malaria, and that he was expecting being transferred to India in October. His elder brother, Private Jack Pickles, was killed in France in May, 1917.


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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 20/12/2011 : 09:33
Surname: PICKLES

Forename(s): Mark

Place of Birth: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Residence: Burnley, Lancashire

Service No: 14265

Rank: Private

Regiment/Corps/Service: East Lancashire Regiment

Battalion/Unit: 1st Battalion

Division: 4th Division

Age: --

Date of Death: 1917-10-04

Awards: -----

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: Panel 77 to 79 and 163A.

CWGC Cemetery: -----

CWGC Memorial: TYNE COT MEMORIAL

Non-CWGC Burial: -----

Comments:

1911 Burnley Census: 7, Cornwall Terrace - Mark Pickles, aged 29 years, born Barnoldswick, husband of Esther Pickles and son of Emily Jane Pickles, widow.

Craven's Part in the Great War Entry:

(Not in CPGW - found in SD)

West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record Entry:

 

1st Bn. East Lancashire Regiment
1917
Two battalions, 1st Somerset Light Infantry on the right with 1st Hampshire on the left, were detailed for the assault: the 1st East Lancashire Regiment was in support of these two battalions . . .
The front occupied by the two assaulting battalions at Zero hour lay about half way between Langemarck and Poelcapelle facing north-east. The forward troops of the 1st East Lancashire Regiment were about 200 yards in rear of this line. The final objective was no more than a distance of, say, 1,250 yards. Zero hour was 6:00 a.m. [4th October] at which time the light was ideal.
So far as the 11th Brigade [that included the 1st East Lancashire Regiment] front was concerned, the battle proceeded entirely to programme; so successful, indeed, was the advance, that a message from Brigade H.Q. ordered the final objective to be extended another 300 to 400 yards. Zero hour for this further advance was to be at 6:30 p.m.: orders to this effect were sent out from Battalion H.Q. at 1:45 p.m.
At about 2:00 p.m., however, troops on the left were observed to be retiring from the direction of 19 Metre Hill, situated 1,200 yards N.W. of Poelcapelle Church. Captain Tinling, on his own initiative, at once led his company through the retiring troops and restored the situation insomuch that the exposed flank of the 1st Hampshire Regiment was thus protected. 'D' and 'B' Companies supported 'A' Company, though to what extent the fog of war concealed. In any case much time was lost, the battalion was much disorganized and heavy casualties were suffered. The further proposed advance of the 11th Brigade had therefore to be abandoned. The gallant Tinling was killed. The action of a party commanded by Sergt. Cottom is particularly noteworthy. This N.C.O. had been warned by Captain Tinling, his company commander, of the importance of 19 Metre Hill: grasping the situation at once, he took command of what was left of the company, some 50 in number, established himself on the eastern slopes of 19 Metre Hill, crushed an enemy counter-attack by rifle and Lewis-gun fire and in spite of heavy artillery fire, directed by hostile aircraft, held on to his position until relieved forty-eight hours later.
A very dark night following the battle rendered the task of re-organization a matter of great difficulty: it is safe to compute that, at daybreak on the 5th, the regiment would not have been able to muster more than 100 rifles.
[Mark Pickles was killed in action on the 4th October.]


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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 20/12/2011 : 10:03
Surname: PICKOVER

Forename(s): Walton

Place of Birth: Salterforth, Yorkshire

Residence: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Service No: 3/10955

Rank: Private

Regiment/Corps/Service: Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment)

Battalion/Unit: 2nd Battalion

Division: 5th Division

Age: 39

Date of Death: 1915-04-18

Awards: -----

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: Panel 20.

CWGC Cemetery: -----

CWGC Memorial: YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL

Non-CWGC Burial: -----

Comments:

On the Earby Cenotaph he is recorded as 'Walter' Pickover.

British Army WW1 Medal Rolls Index Cards: Pte Wallon Pickover, 3/10955, West Riding Regiment.

Craven's Part in the Great War Entry:

PRIVATE W. PICKOVER, Duke of Well.'s Regt., of Shuttleworth Street, Earby, killed in action April, 1916.

West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record Entry:

PICKOVER, Walton, aged 38 years, West Riding Regiment, missing since April 18, 1915, after the Battle of Hill 60, death presumed May, 1916.

Article Date: 05 May 1916
BARNOLDSWICK SOLDIER'S DEATH PRESUMED
Mrs. W. Pickover, 12, Turner Street, Barnoldswick, has received a War Office note presuming the death of her husband, Pte. Walton Pickover, of the 2nd West Riding Regiment, who had been missing since April 18th, 1915, after taking part in the battle of Hill 60. Pte. Pickover, who was 38 years of age, joined the Army in August, 1914, and went out to France the January following. He worked as a cop winder at Messrs. B. and E. M. Holden's Moss Shed. He leaves a widow and two children.

Article Date: 05 May 1916
PICKOVER - Private Walton Pickover, 2nd West Ridings, formerly of Barnoldswick, missing since April, 1915, death presumed May 1916


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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 20/12/2011 : 10:04
Surname: PICKUP

Forename(s): Herbert

Place of Birth: Earby, Yorkshire

Residence: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Service No: 45355

Rank: Private

Regiment/Corps/Service: Highland Light Infantry

Battalion/Unit: 15th (Service) Battalion. (1st Glasgow)

Division: 32nd Division

Age: 19

Date of Death: 1918-05-25

Awards: -----

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: II. D. 23.

CWGC Cemetery: BAC-DU-SUD BRITISH CEMETERY, BAILLEULVAL

CWGC Memorial: -----

Non-CWGC Burial: -----

Comments:

1911 Barnoldswick Census: Cherry Dene, Rostle Top Road - Herbert Pickup, aged 12 years, born Earby, son of James and Elizabeth A. Pickup.

British Army WW1 Medal Rolls Index Cards: Private Herbert Pickup, 15368, West Riding Regiment, and 45355, Highland Light Infantry, and 202330, Royal Scots.

Herbert Pickup probably served with the 8th (Service) Battalion Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment) before his parents 'reclaimed' him for being under age. He was subsequently conscripted.

Brother of John Edward Pickup (266122).

Craven's Part in the Great War Entry:

PRIVATE HERBERT PICKUP, Highland Light Infantry, son of Mr. & Mrs. James Pickup, Cherry Dene, Barnoldswick, killed in action 26th May, 1918. Aged 19 years.

West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record Entry:

PICKUP, Herbert, aged 19 years, West Riding Regiment, Cherrydale, [Barnoldswick], killed in action May 24, 1918.

Article Date: 31 May 1918
Private Herbert Pickup, Barnoldswick
News was received yesterday (Thursday) morning, in a letter from a comrade of the death of Private Herbert Pickup, Highland Light Infantry, who was killed in action on Friday last (May 24th). He was 19 years of age and the youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. James Pickup, Cherrydene, Barnoldswick, whose other son, Private John Ed. Pickup, D.C.M., was killed earlier in the war.

Article Date: 07 June 1918
CRAVEN AND THE WAR
Pte. Herbert Pickup, Barnoldswick
Above is a portrait of Pte. Herbert Pickup, Highland Light Infantry, who (as briefly reported last week) was killed in France on May 24th, aged 19 years. This is the second bereavement of the war which has befallen Mr. and Mrs. James Pickup, Cherrydene. Barnoldswick, elder son. Pte. John Edward Pickup, whose services as a stretcher-bearer in the Duke of Wellington's Regiment won the Distinguished Conduct Medal, having been killed in March, 1917. Pte. Herbert Pickup enlisted in February, 1915, when only 16 years of age, in the Duke of Wellington's Regiment, and went out to the Dardanelles in the September following. After the evacuation he spent a short time in Egypt before going to France. After a statement by Mr. Tennant in the House of Commons his parents reclaimed him six months prior to attaining the age of 18, and he returned home. On being recalled to the colours he joined the Royal Scots at Edinboro', and was transferred to the Highland Light Infantry on returning to France in March last

British Army WW1 Medal Rolls Index Cards: Private Herbert Pickup, 15368, West Riding Regiment, and 45355, Highland Light Infantry, and 202330, Royal Scots.

Herbert Pickup probably served with the 8th (Service) Battalion Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment) before his parents 'reclaimed' him for being under age. He was subsequently conscripted


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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 20/12/2011 : 10:05
Surname: PICKUP

Forename(s): John Edward

Place of Birth: Burnley, Lancashire

Residence: -----

Service No: 266122

Rank: Private

Regiment/Corps/Service: Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment)

Battalion/Unit: 1/6th Battalion

Division: 49th (West Riding) Division

Age: 24

Date of Death: 1917-03-29

Awards: D.C.M.

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: IV. F. 5.

CWGC Cemetery: ST VAAST POST MILITARY CEMETERY, RICHEBOURGE-L'AVOUE

CWGC Memorial: -----

Non-CWGC Burial: -----

Comments:

1911 Barnoldswick Census: Cherry Dene, Rostle Top Road - John Ed. Pickup, aged 18 years, born Burnley, son of James and Elizabeth A. Pickup.

British Army WW1 Medal Rolls Index Cards: Pte John E. Pickup, 3360 and 266122, West Riding Regiment.

Brother of Herbert Pickup (45355).

Craven's Part in the Great War Entry:

PRIVATE JOHN EDWARD PICKUP, D.C.M., Duke of Well.'s Regt., son of Mr. & Mrs. Pickup, Cherry Dene, Barnoldswick, killed in action 29th March, 1917. Aged 24 years.

West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record Entry:

PICKUP, John Edward, D.C.M., aged 24 years, West Riding Regiment, son of Mr. and Mrs. Pickup, Cherry House, [Barnoldswick], killed in France Mar. 25, 1917.

Article Date: 20 November 1914
A RECRUITING SCOOP
A recruiting 'scoop' was made by the 6th Battalion West Riding Regiment when they persuaded a number of Barnoldswick men, who were connected with the St. John Ambulance Division, to join the ranks as a Bearer Company. Some of these men were viewed as prospective valuable additions to the complement of the Royal Naval Sick Berth Reserve, but the Army 'got there' first. The Bearer Company includes the following local men:- Sergt. P.H. Garnett, and Privates R.W.W. Collyer, J.W. Smith, George Harwood, George Harrison, F. Barker. J.E. Pickup, E. Schofield, W. Strickland, R. Harrison. E. Woodhead, S. Lee, F. Bracewell, J.H. Holden, J. Pickup. J.H. Whitley, and H. Thomas. Other men who have joined the Army this week are R. Metcalfe, W.J. Shuttleworth, and H. Blackburn

Article Date: 20 October 1916
BARNOLDSWICK'S FIFTH D.C.M.
News is to hand that Pte. John Edward Pickup, son of Mr. and Mrs. James Pickup, Cherrydene, Barnoldswick, has been awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal. Pte. Pickup, who is 23 years of age, went out with the Duke of Wellington's in April 1915 as a stretcher-bearer, and is the third Barnoldswick stretcher-bearer to earn that distinction, the others being Sergeant P.H. Garratt and Pte. Fred Bracewell. Two other Barlickers in the same regiment who were awarded the D.C.M. were Co.-Sergt.-Major Green (since killed) and Sergeant James Bury.
In a letter acquainting his parents of the fact, Pte. Pickup says:- "I have just been presented with the D.C.M. ribbon, and I shall be receiving the medal very likely before long."

Before joining the Army he worked as a weaver at Messrs. Albert Hartley and Co.'s, Long Ing.

Article Date: 29 December 1916
BARNOLDSWICK - HONOURING A D.C.M. WINNER
A pleasing touch of variety was given to the annual Christmas gathering in connection with the Wesleyan Sunday School on Monday evening by the presentation of a wristlet watch with luminous dial to Sergt. James Bury, an old scholar, in recognition of his winning the D.C.M. Mr. R. Kendall presided over a large attendance.
In making the presentation the Rev. A. Bradfield said they all felt proud of the boys who had belonged to their Sunday School who had shown themselves possessed of qualities little suspected. While they remained at home their parents and friends valued them greatly, but now the country had begun to show its appreciation of their noble service. He felt proud to be associated with a Sunday School which had four D.C.M. winners amongst its old boys (applause) - Pte. Bracewell, Sergt. Garratt, Sergt. Bury, and Pte. Pickup. The three first named had all now been similarly honoured, and they were anxiously awaiting the home coming of Pte. Pickup in order to make a presentation to him also.

Segt. Bury made a neat little speech in response, modestly asserting that there were hundreds of his pals who had deserved the honour equally with himself.
Songs, &c., were rendered during the evening by Miss N. Simpson, Mr. E. Lambert, Mr. J. Horsfield, and Mr. Duckworth.
Mr. T. Bracewell (secretary) gave an encouraging report of the progress of the school, which has now a total roll of 500 in the three departments.

Article Date: 13 April 1917
BARNOLDSWICK D.C.M. WINNER KILLED IN ACTION
Mr. and Mrs. Pickup, Cherry Dene, Barnoldswick, yesterday received a letter from Captain Ogston, Duke of Wellington's Regiment, confirming the report of the death of their son, Private John Edward Pickup, a stretcher-bearer in the same Battalion, as having been killed in action on March 29th. The writer added:- "The reason for my not writing before was because he was missing for some little time, but was later found and buried in the English Cemetery. I cannot speak too highly of him; he was one of the best stretcher-bearers in the battalion and an excellent soldier. It may be some consolation to you to know that he suffered no pain."
The circumstances of Pte. Pickup's death are more fully described in the following letter (dated April lst) from Sergt. J. H. Whiteley, another Barlicker in the same battalion:- "As sergeant in charge of the stretcher bearers I feel it is my duty to let you know about Johnny. We had a bombing raid into the German trenches in the early morning of the 29th, and nine of us stretcher-bearers had to go with them. Johnny and another Barlicker went over with the first lot. He never came back, and I never saw him after he went over, but Jim Bury says he was close beside him when a shell came and killed him. I and some more S.B.'s searched all over but could not find the least trace of him, and parties have been out every night since, but without success. We cannot tell what has become of him. He may possibly be a prisoner, but I am afraid there is not much chance of that. We did our best to find him and I am very sorry we did not succeed, so that we could have given him a decent burial if killed. He was a favourite in the Battalion with both officers and men, and I feel certain he would have got something beside the D.C.M. if he had only pulled through. He had been with me at the Medical Aid Post for some time, and we were very good friends. I feel his loss keenly, but I know it will be a lot worse for you at home. All the lads from Barnoldswick send their sympathy. They all miss him, and would have done anything to save him. He was bringing in a wounded man when he was hit, and they are both missing. He was the best lad I had - always willing and cheerful and a hard worker - afraid of nothing, and was in rare spirits at the thought of going over the top. He met his death like a hero, I am certain, doing his duty nobly. He was a son to be proud of."
Pte. Pickup was 24 years of age. He had been in France two years, and was awarded the D.C.M. in October last, being the fifth Barnoldswick man to win that distinction. Before enlisting he was employed as a weaver at Messrs. Albert Hartley and Co.'s sheeting works. Three of his brothers are serving in France, one in Ireland, and the other in the Navy.

Article Date: 13 April 1917
PICKUP - March 29th 1917, killed in action in France, Pte. John Edward Pickup, D.C.M., Duke of Wellington's Regiment, son of Mr. and Mrs. Pickup, Cherry Dene, Barnoldswick, aged 24 years

Article Date: 27 April 1917
BARNOLDSWICK - MEMORIAL SERVICE
A very impressive memorial service for the late Pte. John Edward Pickup, a stretcher-bearer of the Duke of Wellington's, whose death was recorded in our columns a fortnight ago, was held at the Wesleyan Church on Sunday morning. There was a large congregation, including some 50 members of the Barnoldswick Ambulance and Nursing Divisions, with which the deceased was formerly connected. These had marched from the Drill Hall in command of Supt. J.W. Thompson. Before commencing his sermon, the Rev. W. Bradfield, M.A., B.D., said:- "In the midst of our rejoicing this morning, we remember one of our young men who went out from amongst us and has now been called hence. - Pte. John Edward Pickup, a stretcher bearer in the Duke of Wellington's Regiment, who has behaved himself with conspicuous gallantry and has been awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal. He was afterwards striving to do his duty bravely and devotedly to help his comrades when in the midst of it his course was ended on March 20th. He was only 24 years of age, and in thus trying to render assistance to those who had been injured in this great struggle he himself was called away. Words fail me when I speak of things like this. We leave him in the hands of God, but to his father and mother and all the rest of the family in their great sorrow we tender our most heartfelt sympathy, and whilst I say this I also want to add that there is another of our young men, Pte. J.A. Plumbley, Duke of Wellington's, aged 22, who is reported missing. You know the terribly deep agony and suspense that that word conveys. To his parents also our hearts go out in deepest sympathy."
The hymn 'Now the labourer's task is o'er' was then sung, and at the close the organist (Mr. C.L. Waller) played the 'Dead March'

Article Date: 20 April 1917
HONOURS FOR BARNOLDSWICK STRETCHER-BEARERS
In a recent letter to his wife, Sergt. J.H. Whiteley, Duke of Wellington's (S.B. Coy), writes:- "You will have seen by the papers that the luck is still with us. I have just heard that we have captured 8,000 at Vimy and 30 guns - and still going strong. It looks like being on the winning side now, doesn't it? I can see visions of Blackpool or Douglas before the summer is over. Ben Pilkington and myself have got the Military Medal for that bombing raid when Johnny Pickup was killed. I am sending you my gallantry card to take care of. I was a bit surprised when the officer sent for me and congratulated me. There were five other officers present, and I had to sit down with them while they wished me luck and drunk my health. Of course, the other lads had done as much as I had, and I'm only sorry they didn't all get something. I recommended some of them, and had no idea I had been recommended myself. It is all a matter of luck but I would rather have gone without anything to have Johnny back with us again. I am keeping all right; nothing to worry about; getting plenty to eat. Bert Wilkin is our cook, you know, and he makes some rare feeds, especially when we are out of the trenches. He is quite a nap hand at roly-poly puddings. I intend making a bit of a tea-party when we are out of the trenches again for all the stretcher-bearers who were with me that night."
Sergt. Whiteley has been out in France two years. He had previously served in South Africa during the Boer war, and holds the Ambulance Medal for that campaign. He is a son of Mr. John Whiteley, tailor, Chapel Street, Barnoldswick.

Article Date: 25 January 1918
BARNOLDSWICK
WESLEYAN 'AT HOMES' - INTERESTING PRESENTATION
These popular gatherings were held an Thursday, Friday, and Saturday evenings last week, and in spite of numerous counter attractions were accorded a fair amount of patronage. An interesting feature on the opening night was the presentation of a wristlet watch to Pte. Linnaeus Pilkington, a stretcher-bearer in the Duke of Wellington's Regiment, in recognition of his winning the Military Medal. Pte. Pilkington's parents now reside at Nelson, but he attended the Wesleyan Sunday School for 12 years before leaving Barnoldswick and is on the 'Roll of Honour.' The Rev. A. Bradfield, (sup. minister), in the course of a few remarks said the conferment of the medal to Pte. Pilkington made the seventh distinction of its kind worn by former scholars. One of these (Sergt. J. Bury) had been awarded both the D.C.M. and the M.M., while the remainder were five stretcher-bearers all belonging to the same battalion, viz., Sergt. P.H. Garratt., Sergt. J. Whiteley, Pte. F. Bracewell (D.C.M). Pte. J.S. [J.E.] Pickup (killed). and Pte. Pilkington. The latter was loudly cheered on rising to receive the watch, which was buckled to his wrist by Mrs. J. Toft (who presided).


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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 20/12/2011 : 10:06
Surname: PITCHFORD

Forename(s): James

Place of Birth: Donnington Wood, Shropshire

Residence: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Service No: 267805

Rank: Private

Regiment/Corps/Service: Prince of Wales's Own (West Yorkshire Regiment)

Battalion/Unit: 1/7th Battalion. (Leeds Rifles)

Division: 49th (West Riding) Division

Age: 40

Date of Death: 1918-04-25

Awards: -----

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: Panel 42 to 47 and 162.

CWGC Cemetery: -----

CWGC Memorial: TYNE COT MEMORIAL

Non-CWGC Burial: -----

Comments:

1881 Lilleshall, Shropshire Census: 24, Barracks, Donnington - James Pitchford, aged 3 years, born Lilleshall, son of Moses and Jane M. Pitchford.

1901 Lilleshall, Shropshire Census: 70, New Buildings - James Pitchford, aged 23 years, born Donnington, Shropshire, son of Moses and Ann Pitchford.

Possibly related to Thomas G. Pitchford (268836).

Craven's Part in the Great War Entry:

RIFLEMAN JAMES PITCHFORD, West Yorkshire Regt., 8, Foresters Buildings, Barnoldswick, reported missing April 25th, 1918; death presumed July, 1919. Aged 40 years.

Article Date: 31 May 1918
WOUNDED AND MISSING
Private J. Pitchford, West Yorks (8 Foresters' Buildings, Barnoldswick) is missing since April 25th

Article Date: 01 August 1919
BARNOLDSWICK
Rifleman James Pitchford, West Yorks., whose death has been presumed by the War Office, was previously reported missing on 25th April, 1918. He was 40 years of age and unmarried, and lived with his sister at 8 Foresters' Buildings, Barnoldswick.


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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 20/12/2011 : 10:07
Surname: PITCHFORD

Forename(s): Thomas Gilbert

Place of Birth: Dawley, Shropshire

Residence: Wellington, Shropshire

Service No: 268836

Rank: Private

Regiment/Corps/Service: Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment)

Battalion/Unit: 2/4th Battalion

Division: 62nd (2/West Riding) Division

Age: 22

Date of Death: 1918-03-29

Awards: -----

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: V. G. 7.

CWGC Cemetery: GOMMECOURT BRITISH CEMETERY NO.2, HEBUTERNE

CWGC Memorial: -----

Non-CWGC Burial: -----

Comments:

1901 Monesley Lane & Rock, Wellington, Shropshire Census: Monesley Lane - Thomas Pitchford, aged 3 years, born Dawley, Shropshire, grandson of Maria Deakin, widow and son of Edwin and Ann Pitchford.

1911 Oakengates, Shropshire Census: Perseverance Terrace, Ketley Bank - Thomas G. Pitchford, aged 13 years, born Dawley, Shropshire, son of Edwin Pitchford, widower.

The aunt of Thomas G. Pitchford mentioned in the Craven Herald article of 12 April 1918 was his mother's sister, Rachel Baxter, née Deakin.

Possibly related to James Pitchford (267805).

Craven's Part in the Great War Entry:

PRIVATE THOMAS GILBERT PITCHFORD, Duke of Well.'s Regt., of Ness Houses, Brogden, killed in action 28th March, 1918.

West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record Entry:

PITCHFORD, T.C., aged 20 years, [Barnoldswick], West Riding Regiment, killed in action March 28, 1918.

Article Date: 12 April 1918
Private T. G. Pitchford, Barnoldswick
Private Thos. Gilbert Pitchford, Duke of Wellington's Regiment, reported killed in action on March 28th, was 20 years of age, and a native of Wellington, Salop, but since the death of his mother, had been brought up by his aunt, Mrs. R. Baxter, Newhouse, Brogden. He went out to France last September, and was wounded on November 24th. Prior to his joining up he worked for Messrs. Alderton, Fernbank Shed. His two brothers, who also lived in Barnoldswick, are in the Army: one in France, and the other in hospital in England, having been twice wounded.

Article Date: 12 April 1918
PITCHFORD - Killed in action, March 28th, Pte. T.G. Pitchford, West Riding Regiment, who resided with his aunt, Mrs. R. Baxter, of Newhouse, Brogden, aged 20.


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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 20/12/2011 : 10:08
Surname: PLUMBLEY

Forename(s): Joseph Albert

Place of Birth: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Residence: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Service No: 12353

Rank: Private

Regiment/Corps/Service: Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment)

Battalion/Unit: 2nd Battalion

Division: 4th Division

Age: 22

Date of Death: 1916-10-12

Awards: -----

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: Pier and Face 6 A and 6 B.

CWGC Cemetery: -----

CWGC Memorial: THIEPVAL MEMORIAL

Non-CWGC Burial: -----

Comments:

Possibly the cousin of Jeremiah Plumbley (242657).

Craven's Part in the Great War Entry:

PRIVATE J. A. PLUMBLEY, Duke of Well.'s Regt., son of Mr. & Mrs. H. Plumbley, 9, Powell St., Barnoldswick, reported killed 12th October, 1916. Aged 22 years.

West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record Entry:

PLUMBLEY, J.A., aged 22 years, Duke of Wellington's West Riding Regiment, son of Mr. and Mrs. Hy. Plumbley, 9, Power Street, [Barnoldswick], killed in action, Nov. 11, 1916.

Article Date: 03 December 1915
BARNOLDSWICK - PERSONAL PARS
Private J. A. Plumbley, D Company, 2nd Battalion Duke of Wellington's, has been spending a week's furlough at home after ten months' active service with the B.E. F. in France and Flanders. He took part in the assault on Hill 60, where he suffered slightly from gas poisoning. Before enlisting he was connected with the Barnoldswick Congregational Church, and was present at the evening service on Sunday, when the hymn 'God be with you till we meet again,' was impressively sung at the close.
Lance-Corporal W. C. Whipp (Duke of Wellington's), who was wounded in France three months' ago by a bullet in the shoulder, is now in West London Hospital for a second operation. When the bone was set after six weeks' waiting for the wound to heal, Lance-Corporal Whipp found that he had no use in his wrist, probably owing to the disconnection of one of the nerves.
Pte. J. Greenhalgh (Duke of Wellington's), who was wounded in France during the summer, has been invalided home and given light employment in one of the Government Telephone Exchanges, there being but little hope of his perfect recovery.
Sapper F. G. Wilcock and Pte. Frank Bailey, of the same regiment, are in hospital in France suffering from the effects of fatigue and sickness

Article Date: 03 December 1915
GASSED AT HILL 60
Private J. A. Plumbley, D. Co. Grenadiers, 2nd Battalion Duke of Wellington's, Regiment, has been spending a week's furlough at home after ten months' active service with the British Expeditionary Force in France and Flanders. He took part in the assault on Hill 60, where he suffered slightly from gas poisoning. Before enlisting he was connected with the Barnoldswick Congregational Church, and was present at the evening service on Sunday, when the hymn 'God be with you till we meet again' was impressively sung at the close

BARNOLDSWICK CASUALTIES
Official news of the death of Pte. J. A. Plumbley, Duke of Wellington's Regiment, has been received by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Hy. Plumbley, 9, Powell Street, Barnoldswick. He had previously been posted missing since October 12th, but from information received from one of his comrades he was probably killed on the 11th. Pte. Plumbley was 22 years of age and the eldest of the family. He enlisted in November 1914, and had spent nearly two years at the Front, with the exception of one short leave. Before joining the Army he was employed as a loomer at Messrs. W. Bailey's Ltd., Wellhouse Mill

 

Article Date: 24 November 1916
PLUMBLEY - October 12, 1916, killed in action in France, Pte. J. A. Plumbley, Duke of Wellington's Regiment, eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. H. Plumbley, of 9, Powell Street, Barnoldswick, aged 22 years.

Article Date: 24 November 1916
MORE BARLICKIANS PAY THE PRICE - HOW PRIVATE PLUMBLEY DIED: Officer's Kindly Tribute
Mr. and Mrs. H. Plumbley, 9, PowelI Street, Barnoldswick, have now received further particulars relating to the fate of their eldest son, Private J.A. Plumbley, Duke of Wellington's, whose death at the age of 22 was chronicled a fortnight ago.

Pte. Plumbley, who had been at the Front nearly two years, was reported missing on October 12th. Three weeks later the anxious parents received the following letter from a Lincoln address:-

"We went to see our son, who is wounded, in Stoke-on-Trent War Hospital. On the 14th October, the morning he received his wound, he found this packet containing Bible, letters, photos, etc. My son wished us to try and get them sent to some relative or friend. We sincerely hope the young man to whom they belonged is safe and well."
In response to an announcement in a daily paper asking for information as to his son, Mr. Plumbley received the following on the 7th November:-

"I beg to inform you that Pte. J.A. Plumbley, of the Duke of Wellington's, was killed by the same shell which wounded me on the 11th Oct. I did not know the young fellow, but he dropped at my feet in the German front line trench. He had his hip and left leg blown off. He went over the top the same time as us, and died about ten minutes after being wounded. The reason I got to know him was that an officer dropped close to him, and when the stretcher bearers came to take the latter away he saw your son, and said "That is Plumbley, dead." So I thought of the name ever since. I got wounded in the right thumb, and was sorry I could not do anything for him. It was at a village called -----."
Yours truly, PRIVATE J. ANDERTON (Lancs. Fus.) (now in Dewsbury Military Hospital)
In a further letter Private Anderton writes:- "The 'Dukes' occupied the trenches behind us on the 10th October and we all made the charge together on the 11th at half-past two. We were in the front lines, and your son's regiment was in another trench 100 yards behind. We had to take the German first line, and your son's regiment had to take the second. Your son had a bag full of bombs on his shoulder, and his pockets full, and he asked me to pull them out of his pockets before he died, but the Germans counter-attacked and we got driven back to our own line, and your son was left in the German line. His pocket was blown away, and it must also have blown away the books you asked about. Your son only spoke to me once during the charge. He said, "Here are some Germans coming" and as we saw them we both got over the trench to meet them when a shell hit him full in the hip. A German officer fired at me and hit my thumb. I got back into the trench again, and your son asked me to lift him down, which I did. I bandaged him up as well as I could, using all the stuff I had, but it was such a funny place. I could not carry him to a place of safety as there was hand-to-hand fighting going on all around us, and I had all my work on to get back to our own lines. He had his senses, and died with a smile on his face."
Amongst the papers received from Lincoln were two copies of a letter of commendation Private Plumbley received for the part he played in rescuing the wounded C.O. of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment on July 1st. The original letter, it appears, was sent home to his parents, but they never received it, and Mr. Plumbley therefore wrote to the Warwickshire's Officer stating the fact, and received the following reply a few days ago:-
"Dear Sir, - I am in receipt of your letter, and am pleased to send you a copy of my letter expressing a slight appreciation of what your son did for me. The C.O. is still on his back in a London Hospital; I saw him about September 20th. I am sorry to hear your son is among the missing in this terrible war. It is a slight consolation to know he died serving his King and Country nobly. Please accept my sincere sympathy."
Yours truly, J. L. MELLOR (MAJOR), Royal Warwick Regt.
The enclosure reads:- "Private Plumbley (12352), Duke of Wellington's, on the night of July 1st, you volunteered to assist to bring in the Commanding Officer. I wish to make you some acknowledgment of the good work you did under trying circumstances. The C.O. is progressing in a London Hospital."
J. L. MELLOR (Capt. and Adjt.), 12/7/16. Royal Warwick Regt

Article Date: 27 April 1917
BARNOLDSWICK - MEMORIAL SERVICE
A very impressive memorial service for the late Pte. John Edward Pickup, a stretcher-bearer of the Duke of Wellington's, whose death was recorded in our columns a fortnight ago, was held at the Wesleyan Church on Sunday morning. There was a large congregation, including some 50 members of the Barnoldswick Ambulance and Nursing Divisions, with which the deceased was formerly connected. These had marched from the Drill Hall in command of Supt. J.W. Thompson. Before commencing his sermon, the Rev. W. Bradfield, M.A., B.D., said:- "In the midst of our rejoicing this morning, we remember one of our young men who went out from amongst us and has now been called hence. - Pte. John Edward Pickup, a stretcher bearer in the Duke of Wellington's Regiment, who has behaved himself with conspicuous gallantry and has been awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal. He was afterwards striving to do his duty bravely and devotedly to help his comrades when in the midst of it his course was ended on March 20th. He was only 24 years of age, and in thus trying to render assistance to those who had been injured in this great struggle he himself was called away. Words fail me when I speak of things like this. We leave him in the hands of God, but to his father and mother and all the rest of the family in their great sorrow we tender our most heartfelt sympathy, and whilst I say this I also want to add that there is another of our young men, Pte. J.A. Plumbley, Duke of Wellington's, aged 22, who is reported missing. You know the terribly deep agony and suspense that that word conveys. To his parents also our hearts go out in deepest sympathy."
The hymn 'Now the labourer's task is o'er' was then sung, and at the close the organist (Mr. C.L. Waller) played the 'Dead March'
2nd Bn. Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment)

Moved forward via Bernafay Wood to Flers Line (9/10). Attack near Lesb?ufs (Spectrum Trench) (12/10) - forming with 2nd Lancashire Fusiliers part of assaulting force. Casualties - 342.

[Joseph Albert Plumbley lost his life on the 12 October 1916.]


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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 20/12/2011 : 10:09
Surname: PLUMBLEY

Forename(s): Jeremiah

Place of Birth: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Residence: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Service No: 242657

Rank: Private

Regiment/Corps/Service: Prince of Wales's (North Staffordshire Regiment)

Battalion/Unit: 1/6th Battalion

Division: 46th (North Midland) Division

Age: 24

Date of Death: 1918-10-03

Awards: -----

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: A. 32.

CWGC Cemetery: RAMICOURT BRITISH CEMETERY

CWGC Memorial: -----

Non-CWGC Burial: -----

Comments:

Possibly the cousin of Joseph Albert Plumbley (12353).

Craven's Part in the Great War Entry:

PRIVATE JEREMIAH PLUMBLEY, North Staffs. Regt., son of Mr. & Mrs. James Plumbley, 18, Federation Street, Barnoldswick, killed in action 3rd October, 1918. Aged 24 years.

West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record Entry:

PLUMBLEY, Jeremiah, aged 24, Staffordshire Regt., 18, Federation Street, [Barnoldswick], killed in action Oct. 3, 1918.

Article Date: 22 November 1918
BARNOLDSWICK - IDENTIFIED BY A PHOTOGRAPH
The death of Pte. Jeremiah Plumbley, of the Staffs. Regiment, has been established beyond a doubt through the means of photographs and other marks of identification received by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. James Plumbley, 18, Federation Street, Barnoldswick. Accompanying the photos was a letter from a comrade stating that he had helped to bury Pte. Plumbley on Oct. 3rd. "The photos I found lying by the side of a dead infantryman. I could see it was the same fellow." Sec. Lieut. R. Barron wrote:- "It may be some small consolation to you to know that he fell at his post in one of the decisive battles of the war, without which we should possibly not have had peace to-day. I am sorry you have not received definite information earlier, as I know how trying your suspense must have been. The reason is that all the officers of 'A' Company as well the chaplain of the battalion were killed or wounded during that week, and as no responsible person remained to write I have just been transferred from another company." Pte. Plumbley was 24 years of age, and married. He was formerly employed at Messrs. Moorhouse and Son's, Wellhouse Mill. He enlisted in December, 1914, and went to France about two years ago. Though not previously wounded he had been gassed and had had trench fever twice

Article Date: 13 December 1918
BARNOLDSWICK - Drowning Case
On Wednesday forenoon the body of a woman named Elizabeth Jane Plumbley (44), wife of James Plumbley, 18 Federation Street, Barnoldswick, was found floating in the canal near Bankfield Shed by a boatman named James Draper. Deceased had been subject to fits of depression since the loss of her eldest son, who was killed in France early in October. An inquest was held at the Town Hall yesterday (Thursday) afternoon before Mr. J. E. Newall (deputy coroner) sitting without a jury. A verdist of suicide was returned.


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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 20/12/2011 : 10:10
Surname: PURCELL

Forename(s): Harry

Place of Birth: Shrewsbury, Gloucestershire

Residence: Burnley, Lancashire

Service No: 12429

Rank: Private

Regiment/Corps/Service: Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment)

Battalion/Unit: 2nd Battalion

Division: 5th Division

Age: 36

Date of Death: 1915-04-18

Awards: -----

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: Panel 20.

CWGC Cemetery: -----

CWGC Memorial: YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL

Non-CWGC Burial: -----

Craven's Part in the Great War Entry:

(Not in CPGW - on Barnoldswick Memorial)


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elise
Regular Member


70 Posts
Posted - 20/12/2011 : 11:59
Shrewsbury in Shropshire?


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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 20/12/2011 : 12:24
All of the above information is in its basic form and as yet unedited, this will not be done until such time as I have all available details, then it will all be checked again and "cleaned up" before publication. Please accept my apologies for such errata.


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Chris CPGW
New Member


41 Posts
Posted - 20/12/2011 : 13:21
The mistake in Harry Purcells county of birth lies with us and is not the fault of Peter's as the information  he's  sourcing  comes directly from http://www.cpgw.org.uk/  and in this particular instance  http://www.cpgw.org.uk/viewDetail.cfm?sID=00F-90&view=main

Error's can  slip through the net when dealing with a large body of information, and we try our best to correct these when they do arise . This is normally done between updates.

Kindest Regards

Chris


Edited by - Chris CPGW on 20/12/2011 1:37:33 PM


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