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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted -  14/11/2010  :  06:26
NEW VERSION TO MAKE IT EASIER FOR MEMBERS WITH SLOW CONNECTIONS TO CONNECT.

Follw this LINK for last version.


Stanley Challenger Graham




Barlick View
stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk
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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 04/11/2011 : 07:18
Inmteresting speech by Bob Diamaond, once described as 'the unacceptable face of banking'. He seems to have had a Damascene Conversion and is now arguing that in the face of mounting protest the banks have to change the way they operate. It was implicit in what he said that he accepts that failure to lend is a major driver of unemployment especially amongst the young. (His future customers)

What strikes me is that he is trying to gain control of the agenda in order to avoid change being forced on the banks from external forces. At the very least he is advocating big changes in our systems. This may simply be the acceptance of reality, it is quite obvious that the Lords of the Universe have been given ultimate power and have cocked up.


Stanley Challenger Graham




Barlick View
stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
Bruff
Regular Member


479 Posts
Posted - 04/11/2011 : 09:14
I see we have a new unit of measurement to add to 'the size of Wales', and 'a London bus' - the 'population of Cambridge' for a number somewhat above 100,000.  Admittedly, we have had 'the City of Southampton' for some time when it comes to the the number of new houses we need each year or the net addition to immigration, also each year.  We are though missing a metric for migration each year, which I imagine falls somewhere between the 'Cambridge' and the 'Southampton'.  One wonders whether Barlick could take its place as a standard unit, and to kick us off perhaps it could be annual deaths from occupational disease.  That is 10,000 folk die each year or 'a population the size of Barnoldswick'.

 
We shall have to see with Mr Diamond.  One of the most interesting if not depressing sights of recent times was his reaction in Select Committee to the direct question on tax-payer bailouts.  Four times he was asked as to whether (paraphrasing) the banks should be grateful for the tax-payer money.  Three times he avoided the question entirely and the fourth time, noted that the banks were grateful for all support.  To be honest, I don't think he actually understood the question as I'm not entirely sure he understands what a tax payer, as meant in the question, is.  It simply is not on his radar.  At all.  Ever.  As I say, interesting.

 
Richard Broughton



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Tardis
Regular Member


453 Posts
Posted - 04/11/2011 : 10:37
Mr Diamond is beholden to his shareholders, and Barclays took no money from the Treasury during the collapse of the other banks. It has also studiously avoided all offers from the Treasury to provide capital over bad debts or extra capitalisation.

Barclays is not a 'good' bank, but it certainly didn't go bust, or come anywhere near going bust. It did feel the effects, however, when the other UK institutions ran into liquidity problems. It has managed to pick up quite a bit of very cheap business from the auctioned assets of Lehman Brothers.

Even John Humphreys on the Today programme this programme was trying to get Mr Diamond to admit that banks shouldn't be bailed out, when he said straight away that they shouldn't.

In a capitalist world, businesses that go bust provide cheap opportunities for others, and the failure of the UK banks has denied access to the necessary restructuring because of the way the UK economy is structured around debt.

The correction is happening, but at an attenuated rate that allows these institutions to continue to trade and write down the debts. The ones that dodged the bullet are sitting pretty and just taking the market share, which is what every economist at the time said would happen. Meanwhile the payback on the Treasury "investment" becomes more of a long term, than mid-term asset revival because the constraints are still very tight on re-investment capital available from profitable business.


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Bruff
Regular Member


479 Posts
Posted - 04/11/2011 : 10:57
Article in The Guardian online today about Nushu, a language used by women in Hunan Provincen China that only they could read and incomprehensible to men.  A legacy of women's separation at the time, where friendships ('laotongs') were made between women whilst awaiting marriage.  Marriage was for the purpose of producing sons, not friendship etc, and so correspondence between laotongs, where emotional companionship could be found, was done using Nushu.  There's a film coming out about it.

 
Prompted someone to note the facial expressions, lip-reading and 'mouthing' as used by (largely female) millworkers and popularised by Ada and Cissy, Les Dawson's and Roy Barraclough's characters.  Apparently, there's also an old Ottoman language Kus Dili (or Tweet language), which is also used solely by women and incomprehensible to men.

 
My point wasn't about what Barclays may or may not have received from any tax payer, which is a matter of record.  It was the interest in seeing, when asked about the generality, one banker seemingly having not the slightest understanding of the question posed.  It took four attempts and the best we got was an acknowledgement of 'all contributions' or some such.  My interest of course; won't be to everyone's.  

 
Richard Broughton 



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Callunna
Revolving Grey Blob


3044 Posts
Posted - 04/11/2011 : 13:08

quote:
Bruff wrote:
Article in The Guardian online today ...

Prompted someone to note the facial expressions, lip-reading and 'mouthing' as used by (largely female) millworkers and popularised by Ada and Cissy, Les Dawson's and Roy Barraclough's characters.
   

(Forgive me if this has been mentioned already but I haven't had time to fully digest all posts in this thread) 

The mouthing activity referred to is known as "Mee-mawing" and was very common in Barlick up to the late 60s (at a guess). There was also a distinctive "Whooer-whoo" call done mainly by women which also seems to have died out with the passing of the cotton worker generation. I just about remember it as a kid.

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moh
Silver Surfer


6860 Posts
Posted - 04/11/2011 : 13:32
I see in the local paper that Silent Night has been saved.


Say only a little but say it well Go to Top of Page
Bruff
Regular Member


479 Posts
Posted - 04/11/2011 : 13:45
Ah!  Yes, 'mee-mawing' that's what is was - I'm glad someone knew what I was on about when I posted 'mouthing'.

 
Wasn't mee-mowing also practised when something was a bit risque, or if someone was supposed to be 'bothering' with someone else?  Never heard of the 'whooer-whoo' thing.  When was that used?

 
Richard Broughton



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Bruff
Regular Member


479 Posts
Posted - 04/11/2011 : 14:19
On the Barlick/Barlic thread I noted that Barlic looks like a Croatian surname to me.  I'm interested in names/surnames, as I have nerdish tendencies and an appetite for matters that serve no purpose at all. (Albeit they are a part of that human inquisitiveness that will always be fundamental, rather than 'leveraged takeovers' or some other silliness which in time will prove of no lasting merit at all).

 
Anyway, I digress.  Anyone whose surname ends in '..ossian' is almost certainly of Armenian stock (as is '...arian').  '..aianen' is invariably Finnish.  Someone whose forename is 16 letters long and surname 20 letters has a good chance of being Sri Lankan.  The two Sri Lankan lads that ran the local newsagents in Surbiton were christened Carl and Harry by the grocers next door for this reason.  '..escu' is almost certainly a Romanian and Lithuanian (male) surnames often end in '..us', '..is' and '..as'.

 
As I say of no use at all this, but I like to look at film credits for example and think, I bet they're a Lithuanian.

 
It gets worse.  I reckon you can make a good guess at the age of a person by their forename here in Blighty.  An Edith is almost certainly in their 80s as is an Albert.  Any Maureen or Eileen is 60 to 70 now.  Me?  Well a Richard might be quite common still, but 40/50s I reckon, along with the Stuarts and the Russells, Janes, Heathers and Susans.  Then we move into the Doms, Dans, Alices and Julias down to the glut of Jacks, Harrys and Hollys.

 
Plus the Kylies and Britanys of which an old aunt of mine once said (not referring to these two), it's all very well having these fancy names but how will they feel when they're collecting their pension?

 
A friend of mine in Sheffield once taught a Rocky - he had a shaved head and a feather-piercing in his eyebrow at 5 years old.  A couple we've got to know where we are now have a Spike and a Thelma.  Now they are good names.

 
Posted a lot today - have a day off.  I think I need to get back to work........  

 
Richard Broughton 



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panbiker
Senior Member


2300 Posts
Posted - 04/11/2011 : 14:38
Used by mums to call kids in for tea or anything else really. My mum used to use it when I was laiking out as a lad. Other mums in our area as well but you always recognised your own. Very much like basic animal instinct and calls in the wild I suppose.


Ian Go to Top of Page
Bodger
Regular Member


892 Posts
Posted - 04/11/2011 : 15:09
Nov. 4th. = mischievous night, is this still held ?, and are the mothers busy with treacle toffee, parkin, & toffee apples


"You can only make as well as you can measure"
                           Joseph Whitworth
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Another
Traycle Mine Overseer


6250 Posts
Posted - 04/11/2011 : 15:12
There was an elderly lady who lived in the Fountain Square flats that look out onto Gisburn Rd. She used to make a fuss of Charlotte when she walked past and would mee maw to her asking how she was and where she was going. Charlotte was fascinated with this but had difficulty in working out how I could understand what she was saying without hearing her.

It might have been female dominated but woe betide a young lad in the mill who failed to lift a heavy roll or piece  from a loom 'cos he missed what the weaver was saying.

I'm sure there were many jokes made at my expense at Watsons that I couldn't understand. Nolic 

 


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Bradders
Senior Member


1880 Posts
Posted - 04/11/2011 : 19:43
In the 50's I can clearly remember watching some of my Grandad's weavers holding a "conversation " from opposite sides of  a large counter in Woolworths (Nelson Centre) without uttering a sound ......


BRADDERS BLUESINGER Go to Top of Page
Bradders
Senior Member


1880 Posts
Posted - 04/11/2011 : 22:30
Which reminds me.......

While visiting friends  , more years ago than I care to mention , their   small daughter sidled up to her Dad  , and asked   "What are you doing Daddy ?"
He was  sitting in an armchair with the newspaper and quite reasonably answered..... "I'm reading......."

To which she replied   "No ,you're not "..

and he said  " Yes ,I am....."

and she said  "Well, I can't hear you.."



 


BRADDERS BLUESINGER Go to Top of Page
Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 05/11/2011 : 05:12
Richard, if one weaver wanted to say something privately to another they stood with their heads on each others shoulders, talked normally straight into the ear and shielded their lips with a hand. Wonderfully quick way of communicating. If I was going to stop the engine early I went to the dhad door and mee-mawed to the nearest weaver and by the time I had walked back to the engine house they all knew. I suppose it was an old fashioned version of modern 'viral' growth on the internet.


Stanley Challenger Graham




Barlick View
stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
Tardis
Regular Member


453 Posts
Posted - 05/11/2011 : 10:15
RBS wrote off £1 billion of bad debts, there isn't enough detail to deiscover if these were sold on at a loss or actually just wiped from the books.

Anyone care to do the maths on the amount of Corporation Tax lost on just this one transaction in the accounts?


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