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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted -  14/11/2010  :  06:41
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Stanley Challenger Graham




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stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk
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Bradders
Senior Member


1880 Posts
Posted - 22/02/2011 : 11:45
Interesting that it then beame a verb...... " to jack the car up "!

Going a little further ......a ramp ? ....

Actually an incline , but also  used in a garage sense as in "Hydraulic ramp " (I'm guessing that comes from the automation of those precarious maintianance ramps you still see outside farms - instead of a pit)  and  then it too becomes a verb ....to "ramp -up"  an arguement  or issue .

Interesting. (oh , I said that already !...)


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catgate
Senior Member


1764 Posts
Posted - 22/02/2011 : 19:26


quote:
Stanley wrote:
 This word 'jack' came to be used for any tool that saved labour so we got the spit-jack, the car-jack etc.

Hence hi-jack. steeple jack, lumber jack, union jack presumably.


Every silver lining has a cloud.


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Bradders
Senior Member


1880 Posts
Posted - 23/02/2011 : 00:16
"Ockard as Dick's  'at-band "........?

Can't imagine what made me think of that one !


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 23/02/2011 : 05:26
Catty, I was thinking about them as Jack and I had our Letcliffe walk yesterday. I can see the connection in 'jack wheel' (the gear on the side of a steam engine flywheel which transmits the drive to the second-motion shaft) and Jack in the box but Jack Well and jack shaft are more accessories than actual tools.


Stanley Challenger Graham




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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 23/02/2011 : 05:44
I found another word yesterday. 'Orient'. Boorstin's explanation of the root is that in the earliest maps of the world (Mappae Mundi), East, the Orient' was always placed at the top so if you wanted to look at the map the 'right' way up, you put East at the top. Hence orienteering for running about with a map and a compass.


Stanley Challenger Graham




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stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
catgate
Senior Member


1764 Posts
Posted - 23/02/2011 : 14:59


quote:
Stanley wrote:
Catty, I was thinking about them as Jack and I had our Letcliffe walk yesterday. I can see the connection in 'jack wheel' (the gear on the side of a steam engine flywheel which transmits the drive to the second-motion shaft) and Jack in the box but Jack Well and jack shaft are more accessories than actual tools.

Come back Jack Heald ....all is forgiven......(a well known old saying in the far peninsula).


Every silver lining has a cloud.


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Bodger
Regular Member


892 Posts
Posted - 25/02/2011 : 09:59
Re Stanley and his buttered paw cure for Balkan, where does to "butter someone up" come from


"You can only make as well as you can measure"
                           Joseph Whitworth
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catgate
Senior Member


1764 Posts
Posted - 25/02/2011 : 11:24


quote:
Bradders wrote:

Going a little further ......a ramp ? ....

..comes from the automation of those precarious maintianance ramps you still see outside farms - instead of a pit) 

A species of small insect with a nasty nip makes its nest in these. It is know as the ramp ant.


Every silver lining has a cloud.


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 28/02/2011 : 06:43
I came across another interesting definition yesterday. 'Strike' as in work stoppage. I suppose I've always thought of it as a blow for freedom etc. Henry Pelling in his 'History of British Trade Unionism' (p. 19) has a different view. "The use of the word 'strike' in the sense of stoppage of work is apparently a 19th century usage. The phrase 'to strike work' was used in the 18th century presumably as an analogy with a ship 'striking sail'. I like it and it makes sense, striking sail bringing the ship to a standstill.


Stanley Challenger Graham




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belle
VIP Member


6502 Posts
Posted - 28/02/2011 : 09:17
I was always tickled by the first "strike" in this country being the London match girls!


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Bradders
Senior Member


1880 Posts
Posted - 28/02/2011 : 09:54
Striking camp always struck (ooops) me as a strange thing to say !


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frankwilk
Senior Member


3975 Posts
Posted - 28/02/2011 : 10:19
Striking the Flag (Ensign)  in International Law is an indication of surrender.

http://www.history.navy.mil/trivia/trivia03-1.htm

Edited by - frankwilk on 28/02/2011 10:20:14 AM



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panbiker
Senior Member


2300 Posts
Posted - 28/02/2011 : 10:20
What about "charlie horse" for a stiff neck? Got one at the moment.


Ian Go to Top of Page
Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 28/02/2011 : 10:28
Never come across it Ian unless it's related to 'charlie' as in a hunched back.


Stanley Challenger Graham




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panbiker
Senior Member


2300 Posts
Posted - 28/02/2011 : 10:41
I'm sure I picked it up of my mum and dad, the saying, not the stiff neck. Very few people recognise what it it means if mentioned although some do.

Your hunched back theory could be about right Stanley, Sally calls me Quasimodo when afflicted, (please don't make me laugh!). It's on the mend and I feel I will soon have full motor function back.


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