Visit the historic Lancashire Textile Project with over 500 photos and 190 taped interviews|2|0
Go to Page
  First Page  Previous Page    22  23  24  [25]  26  27   Next Page  Last Page
Author Previous Topic Topic Next Topic  
Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted -  14/11/2010  :  06:37
New topic to make loading easier for slow connections.

Steeplejacks corner part four

Click on this link for the last section of the topic.


Stanley Challenger Graham




Barlick View
stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk
Replies
Author
Go to Page
  First Page  Previous Page    22  23  24  [25]  26  27   Next Page  Last Page
 
bob hulin
" its going leg it "


1800 Posts
Posted - 29/08/2011 : 09:56
Image


Go to Top of Page
Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 30/08/2011 : 06:28
Bob, I took the liberty of enlarging the Smith postcard. Hope I haven't gone too far!


Stanley Challenger Graham




Barlick View
stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
bob hulin
" its going leg it "


1800 Posts
Posted - 30/08/2011 : 09:58
Thanks Stanley, now i can see it without  my specks.Wink


Go to Top of Page
Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 31/08/2011 : 05:26
Any idea where it is?


Stanley Challenger Graham




Barlick View
stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
Invernahaille
Regular Member


669 Posts
Posted - 01/09/2011 : 03:18
6 pounds and ten shillings in 1911. How much is that in real terms today?


Go to Top of Page
Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 01/09/2011 : 06:26
Roughly X95 Robert, Call it £618. All these conversions are educated guesses. All depends which constant you take. X95 is in the middle of the scale.


Stanley Challenger Graham




Barlick View
stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 17/09/2011 : 07:02
Fernbank stack to be dropped in October. Warbutons are doing it and it will be propped and fired. Taylors are the demo men. See Fernbank Mill topic for the details.


Stanley Challenger Graham




Barlick View
stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
TOM PHILLIPS
Steeplejerk


4164 Posts
Posted - 17/09/2011 : 12:33
Never heard of 'em Winkhehe


"Work,the curse of the drinking class" Go to Top of Page
Bradders
Senior Member


1880 Posts
Posted - 17/09/2011 : 22:58
I've often thought   ......When they've got the gob cut , propped and they are building the fire , they must have to " get a bit of a wiggle on"  to get the bugger down , before the wind blows it backwards........eh!


BRADDERS BLUESINGER Go to Top of Page
Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 18/09/2011 : 05:37
Not really a problem Brad because once the gob is opened the stack usually cracks on the opposite side as it starts to settle towards the gob side, enough lean to withstand a wind change. Peter Tatham used to but a thin piece of material in the crack and have a man watching it as they cut the last of the gob out. As soon as the tell-tale drooped (he didn't use props) the man blew his whistle and everyone got out of the way. When he dropped the Sunnybank stack at Helmshore it was very wet and windy and you could see water pumping in and out of the crack as the stack moved in the wind which was holding it up. In the end Peter called a halt and we went for a cup of tea. Peter said that as soon as the wind dropped the stack would fall. He was right, it took about twenty minutes.


Stanley Challenger Graham




Barlick View
stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
Invernahaille
Regular Member


669 Posts
Posted - 18/09/2011 : 12:09
Ronnie used to ise two methods for a dry drop. On the opposite side of the gob he would put in a couple of dogs vertically about twelve feet apart. He then attached someting like fuse wire to the dogs, and continue with the gob when the wire broke it was time to leave.

The second method was to place a thin timber at the highest point of the gob to the ground. Continuing to cut back the gob when they heard the timber crack, likewise it was time to go.


Go to Top of Page
Bradders
Senior Member


1880 Posts
Posted - 18/09/2011 : 23:03
Fascinating stuff Stanley , and Mr Bamford , thanks......I'm guessing the lads on the job would be in no doubt about which way to leg it , either ....eh !

.......and if that was the "dry drop" , I'd be interested to hear about other methods.

PS  Bob Hulin's avotar .... "It's going, leg it " ! ... always makes me grin ! 

Edited by - Bradders on 18/09/2011 11:12:53 PM


BRADDERS BLUESINGER Go to Top of Page
Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 19/09/2011 : 06:00
That's exactly what Bob's tag means! Robert, I've seen Peter put a light timber in for the same reason if he had any doubts. It had another function as well, if the invert started to move it gave a fraction of a second more warning to anyone working in the gob. Peter told a story about felling a square stack somewhere in the Tod Valley. They had just finished their break after making a start on the gob, not a lot taken out. Higgy, the resident comedian got up first and walking across the the stack shouted to them to come on and get going! At the same time he picked up the 14lb sledge and hit the quoin stone he was stood next to. The stone exploded and the stack fell! Higgy got out of the way in time and Peter said that the stack must have been unstable and leaning to that corner.

There was a different type of problem at Jubilee Stack at Padiham. Ronnie Goggins was dropping it by propping and firing. They got to the point where almost half the stack was cut away and the crack was breathing on the back side, fired it and retired to a safe distance. The fire burned out, the props were gone and the stack still stood there grinning at them. Probably the worst situation you could have. They drove a crowbar into the crack and I have a pic of three of them hanging on the bar hoping it would  start the fall. As they were doing this it started to lean and fell. It was a wet windy dayand I suspect the trigger was a gust of wind rather than the crowbar! Norman had been watching all this and after the stack fell I had a word with him and asked him what he thought the problem was. He showed me what remained of the firebrick liner at the base, it had been running at such a high temperature the face was vitrified and Norman reckoned it was this natural reinforcement of the liner that had held the stack up. He thought it was a gust of wind as well. It was noticeable that large sections of the Jubilee stack didn't break during the fall. It was heavily banded and very rigid, this might have had an effect as well. Complicated stuff! It used to fascinate me.

One more word. Peter told me that the biggest fear was always that the stack was so weak and unstable that it would telescope without warning. He refused jobs where he though the stack was inherently unstable, he said the risk was too great. Fred Dibnah felled an access tower at one mill by cutting, propping and burning. Very complicated structure of course with stairways etc. These had to be cut and propped as well by working inside. It was only done to provide a spectacle for the TV programme and after it was fired, Fred was wandeing round doing his showman's job with the bulb horn when suddenly it telescoped. He was extremely lucky that he wasn't injured. That's the only time I have seen a telescope episode and I certainly took a lesson from it.


Stanley Challenger Graham




Barlick View
stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 02/10/2011 : 14:35
Thanks to Thomo I heard Fernbank was being dropped today. I shouted to Tom but he completely ignored me....



 

 

Another old mate bites the dust....   Think of the service it did. Sad, but I suppose it's 'progress'.


Stanley Challenger Graham




Barlick View
stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
TOM PHILLIPS
Steeplejerk


4164 Posts
Posted - 02/10/2011 : 15:59
Sorry Stanley,I thought i heard you shout,didnt mean to ignore you,i cant make people out these days if they're more than 10 ft away,haha


"Work,the curse of the drinking class" Go to Top of Page
Topic is 28 Pages Long:
Go to Page
  First Page  Previous Page    22  23  24  [25]  26  27   Next Page  Last Page
 


Set us as your default homepage Bookmark us Privacy   Copyright 2004-2011 www.oneguyfrombarlick.co.uk All Rights Reserved. Design by: Frost SkyPortal.net Go To Top Of Page

Page load time - 0.594