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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted -  22/06/2007  :  10:00
WE ARE WHAT WE EAT 2007

 I have shifted the intro to the body of the topic.


Stanley Challenger Graham




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stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk
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Tizer
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5150 Posts
Posted - 09/12/2011 : 15:25
Even more useful would be for people to read the labels of cosmetics and toiletries. The list of chemicals is endless and they can all penetrate through the skin. In the past I've asked experts to tell me why there are so many ingredients in a simple face cream but I never get a convincing answer. My suspicion is that the cosmetics manufacturer is taken in by the clever suppliers of chemicals and thinks he/she has to have them all or might be `second rate'.


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 10/12/2011 : 05:42
I agree, food is not the only area of retailing where pseudo-science to gain market share is employed. The big seller at the moment is wrinle reduction and as I understand it emplots nano-technology. Not for me thanks! I'll live with and love my wrinkles!  Besides, a wrinkle free face has no chaeacter, have you looked at some of the face models?

Incidentally there was a nice piece on Woman's Hour about body part models. One woman has perfect hands and doubles for famous stars and on cosmetic advertisements when perfect hands are needed. Same applies to all parts of the body. Hilarious accounts of doubling for famous stars when perfect naked bottome were needed. There is a parallel universe out there!


Stanley Challenger Graham




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Tizer
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Posted - 29/12/2011 : 09:31
29 December 2011, BBC online news

Alzheimer's: Diet 'can stop brain shrinking'
By Helen Briggs Health editor, BBC News website
A diet rich in vitamins and fish may protect the brain from ageing while junk food has the opposite effect, research suggests. Elderly people with high blood levels of vitamins and omega-3 fatty acids had less brain shrinkage and better mental performance, a Neurology study found. Trans fats found in fast foods were linked to lower scores in tests and more shrinkage typical of Alzheimer's.

A UK medical charity has called for more work into diet and dementia risk. The best current advice is to eat a balanced diet with plenty of fruit and vegetables, not smoke, take regular exercise and keep blood pressure and cholesterol in check, said Alzheimer's Research UK.

The research looked at nutrients in blood, rather than relying on questionnaires to assess a person's diet. US experts analysed blood samples from 104 healthy people with an average age of 87 who had few known risk factors for Alzheimer's. They found those who had more vitamin B, C, D and E in their blood performed better in tests of memory and thinking skills. People with high levels of omega 3 fatty acids - found mainly in fish - also had high scores. The poorest scores were found in people who had more trans fats in their blood. Trans fats are common in processed foods, including cakes, biscuits and fried foods.

The researchers, from Oregon Health and Science University, Portland; Portland VA Medical Center; and Oregon State University, Corvallis, then carried out brain scans on 42 of the participants. They found individuals with high levels of vitamins and omega 3 in their blood were more likely to have a large brain volume; while those with high levels of trans fat had a smaller total brain volume. Study author Gene Bowman of Oregon Health and Science University said: "These results need to be confirmed, but obviously it is very exciting to think that people could potentially stop their brains from shrinking and keep them sharp by adjusting their diet."

More here [LINK]


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 29/12/2011 : 10:13
It all makes sense and confirms my own opinions after reading as much as I can absorb on nutrition. I shall stick to the long chain Omega-3 and my saturated fat intake with plenty of exercise!


Stanley Challenger Graham




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Tizer
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Posted - 29/12/2011 : 15:43
The Elf Police want the NHS to reduce saturated fats in its meals for patients, but its the `saturates' that give us the feeling of fullness and well-being after eating. There is nothing wrong with them in moderation and reducing them in the meals will leave patients feeling hungry and depressed. Also, if you reduce saturates you have to use something else to get the expected texture and mouthfeel in a food...and that's where trans fats and hydrogenation crept in.


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 30/12/2011 : 05:13
What puzzles me is why the canard about saturated fat continues unabated even though the research clearly shows that in moderation they are far better for us than modified oils and fats. All I can conclude is that the food processors are in charge of the agenda and there is no way they want to use dearer fats with shorter shelf-life.

Interesting discussion on R4 yesterday about the possible resurgence of family owned grocery shops to fill the gap between the convenience stores and the Cathedrals of Choice. The example they gave was Booth's in the NW.  I hope  that firms like this who promote local food and higher quality can indeed cut out a market share.

In this context I was thinking yesterday about the so-called 'Price Wars' between the major supermarket chains. I can't help thinking that this may be one of the biggest con-tricks of all time. Have their profits dropped significantly? Are customers finding that their total weekly shop is cheaper? What many people don't realise is that most of the cuts and offers are financed by the supplier who is forced to take a lower price. What does this do for the long term viability of these essential parts of the food chain? In the long term, can we afford to let the supermarkets get total control of food? 

I remember hearing a Coca Cola executive waxing lyrical about the fact that CC had over 3% of the world's drinks market. It came as a bit of a shock to realise that he meant everything the world drinks, including water! It was a tacit admission that their goal was that only CC would be drunk. Market share gone mad.......


Stanley Challenger Graham




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Tizer
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Posted - 30/12/2011 : 10:00
Saturated fats (and dairy fats in particular) have been given a bad press for decades and it's difficult now to change attitudes. It shows how effective and powerful the advertising and news media are, even when promoting the wrong message.

The price wars really are con tricks - remember a few years ago someone said that the supermarkets may not be a monopoly but they are certainly an oligopoly.


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Whyperion
Regular Member


122 Posts
Posted - 30/12/2011 : 20:08
What do you do when the worlds population has eaten all the fish.

Never mind the supermarkets , the worldwide cerals production , and wholesale is in the hands of around 5 major players , about the only good reason to support the co-op as long as they own their own farms.


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 31/12/2011 : 05:19
Have come to the conclusion that one of the reasons I have been below par for a couple of days was that something in the tin of 'festive' shortbread I was given didn't like me! Thrown tin away, I'll bet it was a modified fat used instead of butter because I know my system is sensitive to them.


Stanley Challenger Graham




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Tizer
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Posted - 31/12/2011 : 10:16
Whippy, before we have eaten all the fish we will be eating krill to get our omega-3 (plankton such as krill are the fish's soure of omega-3). But before we get to that stage the current research to develop crop plants containing omega-3 will have given us another source.

If you are interested in cereals production have a look at the FAO Agribusiness Handbook here: [LINK]  It has this to say about the grain trade: "There has been some consolidation of the grain trading business due to the mergers and acquisitions of the last ten years (Cargill’s purchase of the Continental Grain merchandising business, completion of the Archer Daniels and Midland (ADM) acquisition of A.C. Toepfer International, etc.). It is difficult to rank the grain trading companies in terms of trade volume as most of them do not declare grain trade volumes or separate wheat trade from their other trading activities in coarse grain, oilseeds, vegetable oils or other commodities. The leading grain trading companies in the world are believed to be Cargill, Bunge, ADM (all United States companies) and Louis Dreyfus (French company)." The company they don't mention is the most secretive one, Glencore  [LINK]

Stanley, are you sure the 'festive' shortbread wasn't festered shortbread?

Edited by - Tizer on 31/12/2011 10:17:54


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 01/01/2012 : 05:31
Whjatever Peter. I am still feeling delicate and not eating much...... Don't worry, taking it easy!


Stanley Challenger Graham




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stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
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