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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted -  11/10/2011  :  15:24
Khaki in colour and sombre in content. "Cravens Part in the Great War", there will not have been many households in Barlick and what was then a much larger Craven Area, that did not have at least one copy of this book. In my immediate Family there would have been at least four and I still have two of them, albeit that one is with my son on Anglesey. Over the years I have seen them at jumble sales, in second hand shops and in piles of rubbish for disposal, even left behind when a house has been vacated. They will have turned up all over the place, I have come across them in Wales, the Isle of Wight and Hampshire, the two that I have belonged to my Father and Maternal Grandfather.
Many years ago I went through one of them from cover to cover noting those from Barlick who had given their lives in the service of King and Country, my notes are long gone so I am going to do it again, a few pages at a time, but this time I will include other local places within an approximate seven mile radius, Gisburn, Foulridge, Earby and so on. I will post my findings on here with the name, address and a precis of other details, as some are quite extensive, each name is to have the page number for my reference so that if anyone wants further information, I can soon find it. In a good number of cases there is a photograph, these I will copy and post in groups of ten at suitable intervals. In the book there are 391 pages so I will use a few abreviations hopefully all self explanatory, ie, KIA:- Killed in Action. MPD:- Missing presumed Dead. DOW:- Died as a result of Wounds, and one that is all too frequent, DFD:- Died from Disease or Illness.
One Man was responsible for the existance of these books and that was Mr, Walter Morrison Esq, JP of Malham Tarn who put forward the idea of the book and defrayed the entire cost.
There is quite a bit about the war itself up to page 50, including the Rohilla Tradgedy, then comes the dreadful list of those who did not come home, and so it is that on page 57 we find the first of Barlicks Sons, and is as follows:-

2nd Lieut Harry Thornton Pickles, 3rd Bn Duke of Wellington's (West Riding) Regiment (SR) second son of Mr Stephen Pickles JP, CC, Of Raysgill Barnoldswick KIA 26th April 1916 aged 26. P57.

In these first ten pages the extent of family loss is made very clear for it was in the Village of Carleton nr Skipton that this comes up:-

P53,  Lieut. Anthony E.K. Slingsby, 1/6th Duke of Wellington's (WR) Regiment, Son of Mr and Mrs J A Slingsby Carla Beck Carleton. KIA France 14th July 1915. Aged 26.
P57,  Captain Arthur Morris Slingsby, MC 56th Punjabi Rifles,  2nd son of Mr and Mrs J A Slingsby KIA 8th March 1916 in Mesopotamia. Aged 30.
P58.  Lieut. Stephen Slingsby of HMS Defence, 4th son of Mr and Mrs J A Slingsby. KIA in North Sea June 1916. Aged 24.
This out of a total of five sons all serving.
 
Lothersdale is the next local Village with on P62.  Lieut Alec Wilson, 1st Herefordshire Regiment, Son of Mr and Mrs F J Wilson JP of Lothersdale. KIA 26th March 1917 in Egypt.
P54, Lieut. The Hon, C. A. Lister Royal Marines, Hood Battalion, Only surviving son and heir of Lord Ribblesdale of Gisburne Park DOW 28th August 1915. Elder Brother killed in 1904 in Somaliland.
Greystones, Gisburn.  Lieut. George Proctor, Lancs Fusiliers, only son of Mr and Mrs Thomas Proctor. KIA 7th April 1918 aged 24. P70.
Marton is on P73, Which Marton is not clear,  2nd Lieut, Joseph Bryan Bushby South Staffs Regiment, son of Mr and Mrs Joseph Bushby, Schoolhouse Farm Marton, DOW, 4th October 1918 aged 26.



Ed

Edited by - thomo on 11/10/2011 4:05:43 PM


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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 01/12/2011 : 09:46
Surname: ORMEROD

Forename(s): Benjamin Thomas

Place of Birth: Blackburn, Lancashire

Residence: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Service No: 36274

Rank: Private

Regiment/Corps/Service: Royal Army Medical Corps

Battalion/Unit: 77th Field Ambulance

Division: 25th Division

Age: 30

Date of Death: 1915-06-04

Awards: -----

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: 535.

CWGC Cemetery: BARNOLDSWICK (ST MARY-LE-GILL) CHURCHYARD

CWGC Memorial: -----

Non-CWGC Burial: -----

Craven's Part in the Great War Entry:

LANCE-CORPORAL BENJAMIN ORMEROD, R.A.M.C. formerly of Barnoldswick, died from injuries 5th June, 1915. Aged 30 years.

West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record Entry:

ORMEROD, Lance Corporal Benjamin T., aged 30, 77th Field Am

Article Date: 11 June 1915
BARNOLDSWICK SOLDIER'S TRAGIC DEATH IN LONDON - RUN OVER BY A MOTOR BUS
Early on Saturday morning a telephonic message was received by Mrs. Ormerod, residing at 1, Leonard Street, stating that her husband, Lance-Corporal Benjamin Ormerod, of the 77th Field Ambulance, R.A.M.C., had met with a serious accident in London, whilst on his way home for week-end leave from Flowerdown Training Camp, Winchester, the previous evening.
Mrs. Ormerod, who is a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Waterworth, North View Terrace, made immediate preparations to travel to London in company with her brother. Four hours after their departure, however, a telegram was received from the Commanding Officer of the Regiment, intimating that Lance-Corporal Ormerod had been run over by a motor bus and had succumbed to his injuries. He was 30 years of age, and previous to joining the army last September he was employed by Messrs. Waterworth and Holdsworth, Wheelhouse Mill, and was a member of the Barnoldswick Ambulance Brigade. His parents reside at Great Harwood.
No further details came to hand until Tuesday morning, when letters (two of which had been posted Sunday night) arrived stating that Ormerod was making his way to St. Pancras when the fatality occurred. In evading a motor car whilst crossing the street he got in front of a motor bus, the wheels of which passed over his chest, and he was dead when picked up. Strange to relate, however, the body bore no outward marks of injury. An inquest was held on Tuesday afternoon, when a verdict of accidental death was returned. The body was brought home on Wednesday (for interment at Gill Church yesterday afternoon).

Mrs. Ormerod's brother, Anthony Waterworth, was one of the three Barnoldswick survivors from the Rohilla, and is at present doing duty with the Naval Sick Berth Reserve at Chatham.
Lance-Corpl. Ormerod leaves a widow and one child - a girl of six years.
THE INQUEST
The inquest was held at St. Pancras on Tuesday.
Mrs. Ormerod, of Barnoldswick, the widow, said her husband was formerly a weaver. He visited his home in May, and was then in excellent health and spirits. Some years ago he had a few fainting attacks. She had a postcard on Friday from him stating that he would arrive home at 2 a.m. on Saturday.
William Pawsey, a motor lorry driver, stated that on Friday, about 1 p.m., while he was driving near St. Pancras Station, deceased stepped from the footpath in front of the lorry. He cleared the vehicle, but immediately afterwards stumbled, and before he could recover himself an omnibus travelling in the opposite direction caught him and knocked him down. The front wheel passed over him.
Other witnesses stated that if Ormerod had hurried he might have crossed the road in safety, and that the omnibus was only travelling at between six and seven miles an hour.
Sidney Carter, driver of the omnibus, stated that, noticing the man stumbling, he applied his brakes and pulled up within five feet. When the car was brought to a standstill Ormerod was lying unconscious between the wheels.
The jury returned a verdict of 'Accidental death,' and exonerated the driver of the omnibus from blame.

Lieutenant Leacher, R.A.M.C., expressed the regret of the officers and men of the battalion and their sympathy with the family, adding "Ormerod was an excellent soldier, and his death is a great loss to the battalion."

Article Date: 11 June 1915
BARNOLDSWICK - Funeral of Lance Corporal Ormerod
The funeral took place at Gill Church yesterday afternoon, the Rev. F W. Patten, M.A., officiating. A large crowd assembled in Gisburn Road to witness the departure of the cortege from Leonard Street. The coffin, draped with the Union Jack and covered with beautiful wreaths, including a large circular wreath bearing a 'Red Cross' of immortelles in its centre from the R.A.M.C. Corps to which deceased was attached, was borne to the hearse by a detachment of men in khaki from the Skipton depot. There were also present a number of the Barnoldswick Ambulance Division, in charge of Supt. J. W. Thompson

Article Date: 11 June 1915
ORMEROD - June 5th, in London, the result of being run over by a motor bus, Lance Corpl. Benjamin Ormerod, 77th Field Ambulance, R.A.M.C., aged 30 years.

Article Date: 18 June 1915
THE LATE LANCE-CORPORAL ORMEROD - Memorial Service
Between forty and fifty members of the Barnoldswick Ambulance and Nursing Division attended a memorial service to the late Lance-Corporal Benjamin Ormerod at the Bethel Primitive Methodist Chapel on Sunday morning. The service was conducted by Cr. H. Speed, of Birkenhead, and an appreciative reference was made by Rev. J.E. Woodfield, who expressed the sympathy of the church and congregation with the widow and family of deceased. Mr. Woodfield also expressed the thanks of the family to the ambulance division for coming to the service to signify their feelings of sorrow at the death of one who they all knew and liked very much whilst he was amongst them. At the conclusion of the service the organist (Mr. L. Harrison) played the Dead March in 'Saul'

Article Date: 24 December 1915
CRAVEN'S ROLL OF HONOUR - BARNOLDSWICK
Lance Corporal Benjamin Thomas Ormerod, 77th Field Ambulance, R.A.M.C., died on June 4th from injuries received through being knocked down by a motorbus in London. When at home he resided with his parents at 1, Leonard Street, Barnoldswick. He was 36 years of age, and a member of the Barnoldswick St. John Ambulance Division.


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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 01/12/2011 : 09:47
Surname: PARKER

Forename(s): John Robert

Place of Birth: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Residence: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Service No: 26604

Rank: Private

Regiment/Corps/Service: Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment)

Battalion/Unit: 1/6th Battalion

Division: 49th (West Riding) Division

Age: 19

Date of Death: 1918-04-11

Awards: -----

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: Panel 82 to 85 and 162A.

CWGC Cemetery: -----

CWGC Memorial: TYNE COT MEMORIAL

Non-CWGC Burial: -----
Craven's Part in the Great War Entry:

PRIVATE JOHN R. PARKER, Duke of Well.'s Regt., son of Mr. Fred Parker, 17, Queen Street, Barnoldswick, killed in action 14th April, 1918. Aged 19 years.

West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record Entry:

PARKER, John R., aged 19 years, West Riding Regiment, 17, Queen Street, [Barnoldswick], killed in action April 14, 1918.

Article Date: 10 May 1918
Private J. R. Parker, Barnoldswick
Private John R. Parker, Duke of Wellington's, killed in action on April 14th, was only 19 years of age and the son of Mr. Fred Parker, 17 Queen Street, Barnoldswick. He had been in France six months and before joining up was employed by Mr. T. Nutter, Calf Hall Shed


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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 01/12/2011 : 09:48
Surname: PARKER

Forename(s): William

Place of Birth: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Residence: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Service No: 52999

Rank: Private

Regiment/Corps/Service: Durham Light Infantry

Battalion/Unit: 22nd (Service) Battalion. (3rd County Pioneers)

Division: 8th Division

Age: 32

Date of Death: 1917-01-27

Awards: -----

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: XXVI. R. 6.

CWGC Cemetery: DELVILLE WOOD CEMETERY, LONGUEVAL

CWGC Memorial: -----

Non-CWGC Burial: -----

Craven's Part in the Great War Entry:

PRIVATE WILLIAM PARKER, Durham Light Infantry, son of Mr. Stephen Parker, East View, Barnoldswick, died from heart failure in France 28th January, 1917. Aged 32 years.

West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record Entry:

PARKER, William, aged 32 years, D.L.I., Cobden Street, [Barnoldswick], died from heart failure, France, Jan. 28, 1917

Article Date: 16 February 1917
BARNOLDSWICK - DEATH OF TWO BARNOLDSWICK SOLDIERS IN FRANCE
Pte. William Parker, Durham Light Infantry (Pioneer Battalion), died suddenly from heart failure on the 28th ult. He was 32 years of age and married, his wife living in Cobden Street. In a letter home written ten days before his death he was in the best of health, but a late communication from an officer in his battalion said that Pte. Parker had been under the care of the medical officer for two or three days and had received every attention. He enlisted in July last and left for France on November 28th. He was the only son of Mr. Stephen Parker, 7, East View, Barnoldswick.

Article Date: 16 February 1917
PARKER - January 28th, 1917, suddenly, from heart failure in France, Pte. William Parker, Durham Light Infantry, formerly of Cobden Street, Barnoldswick, aged 32 years.


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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 01/12/2011 : 09:49
Surname: PARKINSON

Forename(s): James

Place of Birth: Blackburn, Lancashire

Residence: -----

Service No: -----

Rank: Private

Regiment/Corps/Service: Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment)

Battalion/Unit: 2nd Battalion

Division: 5th Division

Age: 35

Date of Death: 1919-08-00

Awards: -----

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: -----

CWGC Cemetery: -----

CWGC Memorial: -----

Non-CWGC Burial: BARNOLDSWICK, GILL UNDENOMINATIONAL BURIAL GROUND

Comments:

No entry in SD or CWGC - discharged soldier.

1911 Barnoldswick Census: James Parkinson, aged 27 years, born Blackburn, Lancashire.

Brother-in-law of Private Thomas Francis (7898].

Buried 28th August 1919. The address of James Parkinson in the burial records is 9 Bankfield Street, Barnoldswick. Also buried in the same grave are Joseph Bird Parkinson (buried 6th August 1910), Annie Whitell (buried 4th March 1914) and Hannah Parkinson (buried 23rd March 1967).

 

Article Date: 17 August 1917
BARNOLDSWICK
ANOTHER TELEGRAM MYSTERY
A short time ago Mrs. James Parkinson, Bankfield Street, whose husband has been a prisoner of war in Germany over two years, received a telegram signed "Jim," informing her that the sender might be expected to arrive by a certain train. The telegram, which had been handed in at Lancaster, was addressed to a house in Colin Street, where Mrs. Parkinson and her husband formerly resided. The family were naturally elated at the receipt of such unexpected news, but as in the case of Pte. Walling their hopes were falsified, though as yet no solution of the mystery has been reached. If, as some people are inclined to suspect, it has been done for a hoax, it is a particularly heartless one, for which the perpetrator deserves to smart.

Article Date: 12 July 1918
THREE YEARS IN GERMANY - Rousing Welcome to a Returned Prisoner of War
Scenes of hearty rejoicing quite unprecedented were witnessed at Barnoldswick on Saturday afternoon in connection with the return to home and kindred of Pte. James Parkinson, West Riding Regiment, after three years' incarceration in the hands of the Germans. On arrival at Barnoldswick by the 5-27 train he received a semi-official welcome at the hands of Cr. W.H. Maude, Dr. Glen and Mr. J. Heald; while outside the station he was greeted by an immense crowd who cheered lustily as he took his seat, accompanied by his wife, in a motorcar and escorted by a guard of honour composed of the local Cadets and Boy Scouts, headed by a brass band, experienced something like the triumphal progress of a conqueror right to his home at 5, Bankfield Street, Coates.
Pte. Parkinson, who is 34 years of age, enlisted on December 1st, 1914, and went to the front in the following April. He was captured at Zonnebeke, near Ypres, on May 5th, 1915, having been slightly wounded and gassed. After sixteen days in hospital in Belgium he was placed in prison at Roeclese [Roeselare?], awaiting transfer to an internment camp at Munster, Westphalia. Up to this point his treatment had been nothing to complain of, but on being sent to a working camp at Gelsav Kershen he, along with many others, positively refused to perform the task allotted him, and after a time was returned to Munster Camp. Later, on reporting sick, he was sent to Senelager, where he received punishment owing to his persistent refusal to work on munitions, and was again sent back to Munster, remaining a few months. In May, 1916, he formed one of a working party of 2,000, in four divisions, drafted to the Baltic province (Russia) to work on railway construction. "As per usual most of us refused (he commented) and laughed at the orders given by our taskmasters, even though we had to suffer for it." After visiting Libau, Windau, Mittau, and Riga (the latter having been captured by the Germans), he became so weak and emaciated owing to bad and insufficient food that he spent most of the time in hospital - "a kind of hospital more like a pigsty." On reporting sick at Riga he had his front teeth knocked out, and was nine weeks before he was able to see a doctor. "The best dinner I had there was boiled potato peelings, and it was a scramble to get even that. We could not get our parcels through owing to the railway not being completed." Eventually, however, he was discharged from hospital and returned once more to Munster. Thence to Berlin for medical examination and inoculation, and back again to Munster. Later, sent to Minden, and a second time to Berlin, when he formed the opinion that the food problem had become acute. After a short period at another camp (Hestenmoor) he was transferred to Saltau internment camp, where after lying in bed ten months he received the welcome news that he was to be sent to Switzerland. A further six weeks (spent on the German side of Lake Constance) elapsed, however, before this desired communication was reached, and he landed at Friborg (Switzerland) on the 25th November last in a prostrate condition, being quite unable to stand. The free air of Switzerland and the splendid hospital treatment restored him sufficiently to allow of being transferred to London, though still in a very weak condition, on March 1st this year. A six weeks' stay in King George's Hospital enabled him to come north, first to Halifax, then to Leeds, and at last "home to Barlick, the best place in the lot." Though still looking weak and wan Mr. Parkinson has recovered the use of his limbs and, happy in the possession of a good appetite and an unconquerable spirit, will it is hoped, soon regain his wonted health and vigour. He is now awaiting his final discharge from the Army.

The family desire especially to thank Mrs. Wilson and neighbours, as well as the public of Barnoldswick generally, for the splendid reception accorded to the returned hero.

 

 

Article Date: 17 December 1915
BARNOLDSWICK FAMILY'S PATRIOTISM
It has become a trite saying that there is scarcely a family anywhere but has its representative taking part in one capacity or another in the great struggle. The question has often been asked, in the same connection, which particular street in Barnoldswick has returned the largest quota to the Colours. Pro rata this distinction is claimed for Bankfield Street, Coates, whose six houses are represented by eleven men who have joined since the outbreak of war. One of these, Pte. Jas. Parkinson, of the 2nd Duke of Wellington's, has been a prisoner of war in Germany since the action at Hill 60 in May last.
But the honour of sending the largest quota from a single home probably belongs to the family of Mr. W.H. Pickering, 13, Clayton Street, Long Ing, all of whose five sons are serving in the Army, two of them at the Front. Mr. Pickering, who is 65 years of age, is a retired overlooker, who came from Haslingden to Barnoldswick six years ago. He has a family of five sons and two daughters.
The eldest son, Pte. Herbert Pickering, of the King's Own Scottish Borderers, is now in France. The second, Pte. Harry Pickering, of the 5th Worcester Regiment, is at Tregantle Fort, Cornwall. The third, Pte. Philip Pickering, West Riding Regiment, is at Saltfleet, Lincolnshire. Pte. Wm. Pickering, the fourth son, has had seven years' service with the 2nd East Lancashire Regiment, part of which he spent in India and South Africa. He has been with the Forces in France about fifteen months, and was recently home on a week's furlough.
Pte. Abraham Pickering, the youngest member of the family, joined the 3/5th East Lancashire Regiment about a month ago and is in training at Southport.

rticle Date: 08 February 1918
BARNOLDSWICK SOLDIER'S EXPERIENCES AS A GERMAN CAPTIVE
Private James Parkinson, West Riding Regiment, has recently been transferred to Switzerland after enduring two-and-a-half years' captivity in the hands of the Germans. He is now in hospital at Fribourg (Switzerland), and in a letter to his wife, who resides with her mother in Bankfield Street, Coates, he gives a few glimpses of the brutal treatment to which he was subjected at the hands of his 'cultured' captors.
"I was sent to Russia in 1916 (he writes), and the 'good treatment' we got was the cause of all I have had to go through since. In the first place just fancy me eating 'spud peelings,' for we could get nothing else. That started my illness, and since then I have been in bed, which of course was only of wood (nice thing for a sick person!). You ask to see a special doctor, and get your teeth knocked out with the butt end of a rifle! After being in bed for six months I was told to get up and dig a drain, which I could not, being too weak. It ended up in being kicked and knocked about again, unconscious for four hours without a doctor, and unable to walk since. A short story in a nut-shell, but I could fill books about the 'good treatment' our lads have had, if only I were able to write long enough. There is only one thing I wish for now - that is to be able to do guard in some camp in Blighty. I think I could speak enough German to make them understand, and if they didn't, well the old method - the butt and no grub. I am not saying this for the censor, but you have been kept in the dark long enough. And I might say I was not long enough in the fighting line to get medals and badges, but I know one thing, and that is that all the lads who were in Russia ought to be thought of for the way they stuck it with smiling faces and English hearts. Now I will bring my letter to a close, hoping the doctors I am now under will succeed in making me all right again."
Private Parkinson is a brother of Driver Thos. Parkinson, R.F.A., upon whom has been conferred the Military Medal.

Article Date: 12 July 1918
NEARLY THREE YEARS IN GERMANY - ROUSING WELCOME TO A BARNOLDSWICK RETURNED PRISONER OF WAR
Scenes of hearty rejoicing quite unprecedented were witnessed at Barnoldswick on Saturday afternoon in connection with the return to home and kindred of Private James Parkinson, West Riding Regiment, after three years' incarceration in the hands of the Germans. On arrival at Barnoldswick by the 5-27 train he received a semi-official welcome at the hands of Cr. W.H. Maude, Dr. Glen and Mr. J. Heald, while outside the station he was greeted by an immense crowd who cheered lustily as he took his seat, accompanied by his wife, in a motorcar and escorted by a guard of honour composed of the local Cadets and Boy Scouts, headed by a brass band, experienced something like the triumphal progress of a conqueror right to his home at 5, Bankfield Street, Coates.
Private Parkinson, who is 34 years of age, enlisted on December 1st, 1914, and went to the Front in the following April. He was captured at Zonnebeke, near Ypres, on May 5th, 1915, having been slightly wounded and gassed. After sixteen days in hospital in Belgium he was placed in prison at Roeclese[Roeselare?], awaiting transfer to an internment camp at Munster, Westphalia. Up to this point his treatment had been nothing to complain of, but on being sent to a working camp at Gelsen Kershen he, along with many others, positively refused to perform the task allotted him, and after a time was returned to Munster Camp. Later, on reporting sick, he was sent to Senelager, where he received punishment owing to his persistent refusal to work on munitions, and was again sent back to Munster, remaining a few months. In May, 1916, he formed one of a working party of 2,000, in four divisions, drafted to the Baltic province (Russia) to work on railway construction. "As per usual most of us refused (he commented) and laughed at the orders given by our taskmasters, even though we had to suffer for it." After visiting Libau, Windau, Mittau, and Riga (the latter having been captured by the Germans) he became so weak and emaciated owing to bad and insufficient food that he spent most of the time in hospital-"a kind of hospital more like a pigsty." On reporting sick at Riga he had his front teeth knocked out, and was nine weeks before he was able to see a doctor. "The best dinner I had there was boiled potato peelings, and it was a scramble to get even that. We could not get our parcels through owing to the railway not being completed." Eventually, however, he was discharged from hospital and returned once more to Munster; thence to Berlin for medical examination and inoculation, and back again to Munster; later, sent to Minden, and a second time to Berlin, when he formed the opinion that the food problem had become acute. After a short period at another camp (Hestenmoor) he was transferred to Saltau internment camp, where after lying in bed ten months he received the welcome news that he was to be sent to Switzerland. A further six weeks (spent on the German side of Lake Constance) elapsed, however, before this desired consummation was reached, and he landed at Friborg (Switzerland) on the 28th November last in a prostrate condition, being quite unable to stand. The free air of Switzerland and the splendid hospital treatment restored him sufficiently to allow of being transferred to London, though still in a very weak condition, on March 1st this year. A six weeks' stay in King George's Hospital enabled him to come north, first to Halifax, then to Leeds, and at last "home to Barnoldswick, the best place in the lot." Though still looking weak and wan Mr. Parkinson has recovered the use of his limbs, and, happy in the possession of a good appetite and an unconquerable spirit, will, it is hoped, soon regain his wonted health and vigour. He is now awaiting his final discharge from the Army. The family desire especially to thank Mrs. Wilson and neighbours, as well as the public of Barnoldswick generally, for the splendid reception accorded to the returned hero.

Article Date: 29 August 1919
BARNOLDSWICK - Military Funeral
Yesterday (Thursday) afternoon, in a drenching rain, the remains of Pte. Parkinson were interred with full military honours at Gill Cemetery. A detachment of 24 men of the 1st Devon Regiment, stationed at Skipton, were in attendance in charge of Lieut. Seeth. The burial service at the house and at the graveside was conducted by Mr. Geo. E. Bradley (of Earby) in accordance with the rites of the Spiritual Church. Cr. W.H. Maude and Mr. Wm. Harrison attended as representatives of the Barnoldswick War Pensions Committee.


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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 01/12/2011 : 09:50
Surrname: PEARSON

Forename(s): R.

Place of Birth: -----

Residence: -----

Service No: -----

Rank: -----

Regiment/Corps/Service: unknown

Battalion/Unit: -----

Division: division unknown

Age: --

Date of Death: 0000-00-00

Awards: -----

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: -----

CWGC Cemetery: -----

CWGC Memorial: -----

Non-CWGC Burial: -----

Comments:

Not identified in SD or CPGW.

Craven's Part in the Great War Entry:

(Not in CPGW - on Barnoldswick Memorial)


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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 01/12/2011 : 09:51
Surname: PECK

Forename(s): Denis

Place of Birth: Lancaster, Lancashire

Residence: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Service No: 4722

Rank: Private

Regiment/Corps/Service: Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment)

Battalion/Unit: 1/6th Battalion

Division: 49th (West Riding) Division

Age: 22

Date of Death: 1916-07-24

Awards: -----

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: XIV. E. 10.

CWGC Cemetery: ETAPLES MILITARY CEMETERY

CWGC Memorial: -----

Non-CWGC Burial: -----

Comments:

1911 Lancaster Census: 43, North Edward Street - Denis Peck, aged 16 years, born Lancaster, son of John H. and Lydia Peck.

Craven's Part in the Great War Entry:

PRIVATE DENNIS PECK, Duke of Well.'s Regt., son of Mr. John Peck, 20, Arthur Street, Barnoldswick, died of wounds 24th July, 1916. Aged 22 years.

Article Date: 28 July 1916
BARNOLDSWICK SOLDIER DIES OF WOUNDS
A telegram from the Territorial Records Office, York (received on Wednesday evening) states that Pte. Denis Peck, 1/6th Duke of Wellington's Regiment, to whose case reference is made on another page, succumbed to his wounds in No. 18, General Hospital, Dannes Camiers, France, on Monday the 24th inst. He was 22 years of age, the eldest son of Mr. John Peck, 20 Arthur St., Barnoldswick, and before joining the Army nine months ago, worked as a weaver at Messrs. R. Brooks & Sons, Westfield Shed. He had been in France nearly six months.

A telegram indicating his grave condition was received on Monday evening, followed later by a letter from one of the nursing sisters, intimating that he wished to see his parents.

Mr Peck left for France at noon on Tuesday, on what would appear to have been a fruitless journey.
[The following article comes immediately after the above article as a separate news item.]
Private Denis Peck of the same regiment, whose home is at 20, Arthur St., was on Monday reported in a grave condition from a gunshot wound in the chest at the 18th General Hospital in France. His father went to see him on Tuesday.


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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 02/12/2011 : 16:20
Surname: PETTY

Forename(s): Arthur

Place of Birth: Grimsby, Lincolnshire

Residence: -----

Service No: M/10088

Rank: Senior Reserve Attendant

Regiment/Corps/Service: Royal Naval Auxiliary Sick Berth Reserve

Battalion/Unit: H.M.H.S. 'Rohilla'

Division: not applicable - Royal Navy

Age: 35

Date of Death: 1914-10-30

Awards: -----

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: 8

CWGC Cemetery: -----

CWGC Memorial: CHATHAM NAVAL MEMORIAL

Non-CWGC Burial: -----

Comments:

No entry in SD - Navy.

1911 Barnoldswick Census: 2, Bracewell Street - Arthur Petty, aged 30 years, born Great Grimsby, Lincolnshire, husband of Ann Elizabeth Petty.

Craven's Part in the Great War Entry:

SERGT. ARTHUR PETTY, 2, Bracewell St., Barnoldswick married, one child.

West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record Entry:

PETTY, Sergeant Arthur, Bracewell Street, [Barnoldswick], married, one child. The above resided at Barnoldswick, being a member of the local branch of the St. John Ambulance Association, who were drowned when the 'Rohilla', a hospital ship on which they were serving as members of the Naval Sick Berth Reserve, went ashore at Whitby on October 30, 1914.


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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 02/12/2011 : 16:21
Surname: PETTY

Forename(s): Tom

Place of Birth: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Residence: -----

Service No: M/10099

Rank: Senior Reserve Attendant

Regiment/Corps/Service: Royal Naval Auxiliary Sick Berth Reserve

Battalion/Unit: H.M.H.S. 'Rohilla'

Division: not applicable - Royal Navy

Age: 30

Date of Death: 1914-10-30

Awards: -----

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: 8.

CWGC Cemetery: -----

CWGC Memorial: CHATHAM NAVAL MEMORIAL

Non-CWGC Burial: -----

Comments:

No entry in SD - Navy.

1911 Barnoldswick Census: Springs Farm Cottages - Tom Petty, aged 27 years, born Barnoldswick, husband of Sarah Annie Petty.

Craven's Part in the Great War Entry:

PTE. TOM PETTY, 11, Coronation St., Barnoldswick, married, three children.

West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record Entry:

PETTY, Tom, 11, Coronation Street, [Barnoldswick], married, three children. The above resided at Barnoldswick, being a member of the local branch of the St. John Ambulance Association, who were drowned when the 'Rohilla', a hospital ship on which they were serving as members of the Naval Sick Berth Reserve, went ashore at Whitby on October 30, 1914.


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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 02/12/2011 : 16:22
Surname: PICKERING

Forename(s): Herbert

Place of Birth: Blackburn, Lancashire

Residence: -----

Service No: 40328

Rank: Private

Regiment/Corps/Service: Royal Scots (Lothian Regiment)

Battalion/Unit: 12th (Service) Battalion

Division: 9th (Scottish) Division

Age: 36

Date of Death: 1917-03-19

Awards: -----

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: III. H. 13.

CWGC Cemetery: FAUBOURG D'AMIENS CEMETERY, ARRAS

CWGC Memorial: -----

Non-CWGC Burial: -----

Craven's Part in the Great War Entry:

PRIVATE HERBERT PICKERING, Royal Scots Regt., eldest son of Mr. W. H. Pickering, 13, Clayton Street, Barnoldswick, killed in action 19th March, 1917. Aged 36 years.

West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record Entry:

PICKERING, Herbert, aged 36 years, Royal Scots, son of Mr. W.H. Pickering, 13, Clayton Street, [Barnoldswick], killed in action, France, Mar. 19, 1917

Article Date: 17 December 1915
BARNOLDSWICK FAMILY'S PATRIOTISM
It has become a trite saying that there is scarcely a family anywhere but has its representative taking part in one capacity or another in the great struggle. The question has often been asked, in the same connection, which particular street in Barnoldswick has returned the largest quota to the Colours. Pro rata this distinction is claimed for Bankfield Street, Coates, whose six houses are represented by eleven men who have joined since the outbreak of war. One of these, Pte. Jas. Parkinson, of the 2nd Duke of Wellington's, has been a prisoner of war in Germany since the action at Hill 60 in May last.

But the honour of sending the largest quota from a single home probably belongs to the family of Mr. W.H. Pickering, 13, Clayton Street, Long Ing, all of whose five sons are serving in the Army, two of them at the Front. Mr. Pickering, who is 65 years of age, is a retired overlooker, who came from Haslingden to Barnoldswick six years ago. He has a family of five sons and two daughters.

The eldest son, Pte. Herbert Pickering, of the King's Own Scottish Borderers, is now in France. The second, Pte. Harry Pickering, of the 5th Worcester Regiment, is at Tregantle Fort, Cornwall. The third, Pte. Philip Pickering, West Riding Regiment, is at Saltfleet, Lincolnshire. Pte. Wm. Pickering, the fourth son, has had seven years' service with the 2nd East Lancashire Regiment, part of which he spent in India and South Africa. He has been with the Forces in France about fifteen months, and was recently home on a week's furlough.
Pte. Abraham Pickering, the youngest member of the family, joined the 3/5th East Lancashire Regiment about a month ago and is in training at Southport.

 

 

. .Article Date: 06 April 1917
PICKERING - March 19th 1917, killed in action in France, Pte. Herbert Pickering, Royal Scots Regiment, eldest son of Mr. W.H. Pickering, 13 Clayton Street, Barnoldswick, aged 36 years.

Article Date: 04 August 1916
CRAVEN LOSSES IN THE WAR
Pte. Herbert Pickering, K.O. Scottish Borderers, is in a London Hospital suffering from shell shock and gas poisoning. He is one of the five soldier sons of Mr. W.H. Pickering, 13 Clayton Street, Barnoldswick.

Article Date: 05 April 1917
A BARNOLDSWICK WEAVER KILLED
Mr. W.H. Pickering, 13 Clayton Street, has received news of the death of his eldest son, Private Herbert Pickering, Royal Scots Regiment, who was killed in France on the 19th March. He was 36 years of age and unmarried. Formerly employed as a weaver at Coates Mill, at the outbreak of war he was living in Warrington, and working at Messrs. Crosfield's Soap Works, where he enlisted in the King's Own Scottish Borderers and was sent home from France last year suffering from shell shock and gas poisoning. On his recovery he was transferred to the Royal Scots. Mr. Pickering has four other sons in France, one of whom has been in the army 10 years. The news of Pte. Pickering's death was conveyed in a letter from the Rev. R.T. Cameron, chaplain to the regiment, who records that he was killed instantly while taking up his position in the trenches. "He was a good soldier, well beloved by his comrades and his officers too... He was buried by the chaplain of the Brigade in a graveyard where already many hundreds of French and British have been laid to their last rest. It is a sweet spot on the outskirts of a large town. All the graves are marked by a cross, and carefully registered so that there will be no difficulty in identifying them at a later date, and the graveyard is well attended to by the Graves Registration Commission..."


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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 02/12/2011 : 16:22
Surname: PICKERING

Forename(s): Thomas

Place of Birth: Blackburn, Lancashire

Residence: -----

Service No: 75219

Rank: Private

Regiment/Corps/Service: Northumberland Fusiliers

Battalion/Unit: 1/6th Battalion

Division: 50th (Northumbrian) Division

Age: --

Date of Death: 1918-05-27

Awards: -----

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: II. E. 8

CWGC Cemetery: LA VILLE-AUX-BOIS BRITISH CEMETERY

CWGC Memorial: -----

Non-CWGC Burial: -----

Craven's Part in the Great War Entry:

PRIVATE T. PICKERING, Northumberland Fusiliers, of Essex Street, Barnoldswick, missing 27th May, 1918.

Article Date: 05 July 1918
WOUNDED AND MISSING
Private Thomas Pickering, Northumberland Fusiliers, son of Mr and Mrs. Wm. Pickering, 38, Essex Street, Barnoldswick, is posted as missing since May 27th


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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 02/12/2011 : 16:23
Surname: PICKLES

Forename(s): Edmondson

Place of Birth: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Residence: -----

Service No: 93697

Rank: Private

Regiment/Corps/Service: Northumberland Fusiliers

Battalion/Unit: 2nd Battalion

Division: division unknown

Age: --

Date of Death: 1920-08-07

Awards: -----

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: XIX. H. 11.

CWGC Cemetery: BAGHDAD (NORTH GATE) WAR CEMETERY

CWGC Memorial: -----

Non-CWGC Burial: -----

Comments:

No entry in SD- post-War.

1901 Barnoldswick Census: Clough Fold - Edmondson Pickles, aged 6 months, born Barnoldswick, son of Louisa Pickles, widow.

British Army WW1 Medal Rolls Index Cards: Pte E. Pickles, 93697, Northumberland Fusiliers.

Brother of John Pickles (18902).

 

Craven's Part in the Great War Entry:

(Not in CPGW - CH entry 1920-08-20)

Edmondson PICKLES main record
Article Date: 20 August 1920
BARNOLDSWICK SOLDIER'S DEATH IN MESOPOTAMIA
The death occurred on August 7th, in Mesopotamia, of Private Edmondson Pickles, Northumberland Fusiliers, from heart failure. The sad news was conveyed in a letter from the War Office to his relatives in Barnoldswick last week end. Private Pickles, who would have been 20 years of age next month, was a son of the late Mr. Edmondson Pickles. He enlisted a year ago, and went out to join the Mesopotamian Expeditionary Force at Basra six weeks before Christmas. In a letter to his sister, received the Thursday before his death, he stated that he was in the best of health, having had a successful recovery from malaria, and that he was expecting being transferred to India in October. His elder brother, Private Jack Pickles, was killed in France in May, 1917.


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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 02/12/2011 : 16:24
Surname: PICKLES

Forename(s): George

Place of Birth: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Residence: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Service No: 11596

Rank: L/Corporal

Regiment/Corps/Service: East Lancashire Regiment

Battalion/Unit: 6th (Service) Battalion

Division: 13th (Western) Division

Age: 22

Date of Death: 1915-08-09

Awards: -----

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: Panel 113 to 117.

CWGC Cemetery: -----

CWGC Memorial: HELLES MEMORIAL

Non-CWGC Burial: -----

Comments:

1911 Barnoldswick Census: 80, Rainhall Road - George Pickles, aged 17 years, born Barnoldswick, son of James and Elizabeth Alice Pickles.

Brother of John Thomas Pickles (M/10089).

 

Craven's Part in the Great War Entry:

CORPORAL G. PICKLES, East Lancs. Regt., son of Mr. & Mrs. James Pickles, 80, Rainhall Road, Barnoldswick, killed in action in Gallipoli 9th August, 1915. Aged 22 years.

West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record Entry:

PICKLES, Lance Corporal George, 6th E.L. Regt., son of Mr. James Pickles, 80, Rainhall Road, [Barnoldswick], killed in action on Aug. 9 in the Dardanelles.

Article Date: 03 September 1915
BARNOLDSWICK FAMILY'S SECOND BEREAVEMENT - Brother of Rohilla Victim Killed in Gallipoli
The sad intelligence was received on Wednesday morning of the death in Gallipoli of Lance-Corporal George Pickles, 6th East Lancashire Regiment, who was killed in action on August 9th. Deceased, who was within a month of his 22nd birthday, was the son of Mr. and Mrs. James Pickles, 80, Rainhall Road, Barnoldswick, upon whom the blow has fallen with greater weight by reason of the loss they sustained on the 30th October last by the death of another son, Thomas, in the Rohilla disaster off Whitby. They have two more sons serving in the Army, one of whom is in France and the other in training with the County Palatine Artillery, while another is engaged in munition making at Barrow. Lance-Corporal Pickles joined the Army in August last year and was home on furlough at Christmas and again in April. Only a week before the news of his death, particulars of which will be found in the letter appended from one of his comrades, a postcard was received by his parents (dated August lst) stating that he was then quite well:-
August 12th, 1915
"Dear Mrs. Pickles - It is with deepest regret I write these few lines to inform you of the sad loss of your son. He was sent with other boys to line the ridge when a bullet penetrated his heart. I was lying alongside him when he was hit. I immediately pulled him down and dressed his wound. He lived about an hour and a half, but said he did not suffer any pain whatever. I cannot speak too highly of him. He behaved like a hero, and every one of our boys were proud of him. He was extremely popular with everybody, and all the boys wish me to express their deepest sympathy in your sad loss. Your son was in my company, and I knew him very well indeed. We were good pals and I feel very sorry to lose him. You have the satisfaction of knowing that your son gave his life like a hero. He died in my arms asking me with his last words to write and tell you all about it, and after his magnificent conduct I feel it was the least I could do.

"I remain, yours sincerely, P. McHugh, Corporal."

 

 

Article Date: 03 September 1915
BARNOLDWICK'S SOLDIERS HEROIC DEATH
News was received in Barnoldswick on Wednesday of the death in the Dardanelles of Lance-Corporal George Pickles, son of Mr. James Pickles, plasterer, of 80 Rainhall Road, and brother of Private Tom Pickles, who was drowned in the 'Rohilla' fatality on October 30th. Mr. James Pickles has two other sons in the Army, one of whom is in France. The sad news is sent by Corporal P. McHugh of the 6th East Lancs. Regiment. The writer says:- "He was killed on Monday, August 9th. Our regiment had just made a glorious charge, and we were just landing on a small ridge at the top of a hill when it happened. Your son was amongst the first to reach the top, and he was calling on the other boys to line the ridge when a bullet penetrated his heart... He lived about one and a half hours... I cannot speak too highly of him. He behaved like a hero and every one of our boys was proud of him... He died in my arms, and his last words were that I should tell you all about it, and knowing his magnificent conduct I felt it was the least I could do."

Article Date: 24 December 1915
CRAVEN'S ROLL OF HONOUR - BARNOLDSWICK
Lance Corporal George Pickles, 6th East Lancashire Regiment, son of Mr. James Pickles, 80 Rainhall Rod, Barnoldswick, killed in action on August 9th in the Dardanelles

6th (Service) Bn. East Lancashire Regiment
AUGUST 1915
Attack on Chunuk Bair (9th). Moved forward early morning - original route over Cheshire Ridge into Aghyl Dere found to be crowded with returning wounded and difficult. Turned around and after reconnaissance by Captain G.E. Chadwick crossed into Aghyl Dere and moved forward. Regimental history records . . . 'at daybreak they were still strung out along the ravine. All could hear the British bombardment, but at 5.15 a.m., the hour of assault, General Baldwin's column (Commander, 38th Brigade) had not arrived in its place of deployment.' Leading companies reached start position by 6 a.m. - under heavy fire from enemy position on crest immediately north of Chunuk Bair and machine guns in a cornfield on eastern side of The Farm advanced across open land. First casualties included Captain A.E. Gayer (wounded) and Captain C.G. Lutyens while leading 'C' Company. Regimental history records that this officer apologized to his commanding officer for having been wounded. He died later at a dressing station. Colonel Cole-Hamilton received mortal wounds while leading his battalion, Major Trent (2nd in Command) severely wounded. 'A', 'B' and 'C' Companies checked by fire from hidden ravine between them and objective. 'D' Company under Captain H.S. Bull on right made some advance but forced to halt upon reaching an almost sheer cliff. Relieved by party of 10th Hampshire at dusk and fell back to edge of Farm Plateau. Later assembled at Aghyl Dere.
[George Pickles was killed in this action on the 9th.]


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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 04/12/2011 : 15:55
More will be added here tomorrow, meanwhile please have a look at the "Appeal" topic, any input is valued.


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Jax
New Member


6 Posts
Posted - 18/12/2011 : 14:38
I have followed this topic with great interest, it seems to have been side tracked?  Will there be more?


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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 18/12/2011 : 14:54
Still here Jax, thank you and welcome, just been a tad busy.


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