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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted -  11/10/2011  :  15:24
Khaki in colour and sombre in content. "Cravens Part in the Great War", there will not have been many households in Barlick and what was then a much larger Craven Area, that did not have at least one copy of this book. In my immediate Family there would have been at least four and I still have two of them, albeit that one is with my son on Anglesey. Over the years I have seen them at jumble sales, in second hand shops and in piles of rubbish for disposal, even left behind when a house has been vacated. They will have turned up all over the place, I have come across them in Wales, the Isle of Wight and Hampshire, the two that I have belonged to my Father and Maternal Grandfather.
Many years ago I went through one of them from cover to cover noting those from Barlick who had given their lives in the service of King and Country, my notes are long gone so I am going to do it again, a few pages at a time, but this time I will include other local places within an approximate seven mile radius, Gisburn, Foulridge, Earby and so on. I will post my findings on here with the name, address and a precis of other details, as some are quite extensive, each name is to have the page number for my reference so that if anyone wants further information, I can soon find it. In a good number of cases there is a photograph, these I will copy and post in groups of ten at suitable intervals. In the book there are 391 pages so I will use a few abreviations hopefully all self explanatory, ie, KIA:- Killed in Action. MPD:- Missing presumed Dead. DOW:- Died as a result of Wounds, and one that is all too frequent, DFD:- Died from Disease or Illness.
One Man was responsible for the existance of these books and that was Mr, Walter Morrison Esq, JP of Malham Tarn who put forward the idea of the book and defrayed the entire cost.
There is quite a bit about the war itself up to page 50, including the Rohilla Tradgedy, then comes the dreadful list of those who did not come home, and so it is that on page 57 we find the first of Barlicks Sons, and is as follows:-

2nd Lieut Harry Thornton Pickles, 3rd Bn Duke of Wellington's (West Riding) Regiment (SR) second son of Mr Stephen Pickles JP, CC, Of Raysgill Barnoldswick KIA 26th April 1916 aged 26. P57.

In these first ten pages the extent of family loss is made very clear for it was in the Village of Carleton nr Skipton that this comes up:-

P53,  Lieut. Anthony E.K. Slingsby, 1/6th Duke of Wellington's (WR) Regiment, Son of Mr and Mrs J A Slingsby Carla Beck Carleton. KIA France 14th July 1915. Aged 26.
P57,  Captain Arthur Morris Slingsby, MC 56th Punjabi Rifles,  2nd son of Mr and Mrs J A Slingsby KIA 8th March 1916 in Mesopotamia. Aged 30.
P58.  Lieut. Stephen Slingsby of HMS Defence, 4th son of Mr and Mrs J A Slingsby. KIA in North Sea June 1916. Aged 24.
This out of a total of five sons all serving.
 
Lothersdale is the next local Village with on P62.  Lieut Alec Wilson, 1st Herefordshire Regiment, Son of Mr and Mrs F J Wilson JP of Lothersdale. KIA 26th March 1917 in Egypt.
P54, Lieut. The Hon, C. A. Lister Royal Marines, Hood Battalion, Only surviving son and heir of Lord Ribblesdale of Gisburne Park DOW 28th August 1915. Elder Brother killed in 1904 in Somaliland.
Greystones, Gisburn.  Lieut. George Proctor, Lancs Fusiliers, only son of Mr and Mrs Thomas Proctor. KIA 7th April 1918 aged 24. P70.
Marton is on P73, Which Marton is not clear,  2nd Lieut, Joseph Bryan Bushby South Staffs Regiment, son of Mr and Mrs Joseph Bushby, Schoolhouse Farm Marton, DOW, 4th October 1918 aged 26.



Ed

Edited by - thomo on 11/10/2011 4:05:43 PM


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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 28/10/2011 : 09:36
Best to do this in order methinks. Right Rosilee, I will have a look later. Heather, I will be turning it up on my next sweep through the database. Ian that sounds like a sensible time to me. Thank you all, now back to work.

Edited by - thomo on 28/10/2011 09:36:35 AM


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rosilee
Regular Member


111 Posts
Posted - 28/10/2011 : 11:04
Thank you Thomo , Ian has put a link on and I have got the pic ,thank you Ian for that and all information about my Uncle ,thats great I really appreciate that. Thank you Thomo for all the hard work you have put in to put all the pics from "Cravens part in the Great War" for us all to see ,many names I recognise as my Dad was in that war and died as  result of the gassing but not during the war ,it was some years after    thanks again Rosie


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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 28/10/2011 : 16:34
Progress is slow but sure, here is the full Monty from the the first batch, it is also the first name on our War Memorial:-

Surname: ALTON

Forename(s): George Herbert

Place of Birth: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Residence: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Service No: 267165

Rank: Private

Regiment/Corps/Service: Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment)

Battalion/Unit: 2nd Battalion

Division: 4th Division

Age: 22

Date of Death: 1918-08-14

Awards: -----

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: II. C. 7.

CWGC Cemetery: MONT-BERNANCHON BRITISH CEMETERY, GONNEHEM

CWGC Memorial: -----

Non-CWGC Burial: -----

Comments:

1901 Barnoldswick Census: George E. Alton, aged 4 years, born Barnoldswick, son of Alexander and Elizabeth Alton.
 

Craven's Part in the Great War Entry:

PRIVATE GEORGE HERBERT ALTON, Duke of Well.'s Regt., son of Mrs. Alton, 3, Huntley Street, Barnoldswick, accidentally drowned while bathing in France 14th August, 1918. Aged 22 years.

 

West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record Entry:

ALTON, George Herbert, aged 22, West Riding Regiment, 3, Hartley Street, [Barnoldswick], drowned Aug. 14, 1918.

Data from Soldiers Died Records

Surname: ALTON

Forename(s): George Herbert

Born: -----

Residence: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Enlisted: Halifax, Yorkshire

Number: 267165

Rank: Private

Regiment: Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment)

Battalion: 2nd Battalion

Decorations: -----

Died Date: 1918-08-14

Died How: Died

Theatre of War: France & Flanders

Notes: -----

Article Date: 06 September 1918
BARNOLDSWICK SOLDIER ACCIDENTALLY DROWNED IN FRANCE: One of Five Brothers Serving
Mrs. Alton, 3 Hartley Street, Barnoldswick, has received news of the death of her son, Private George Herbert Alton, Duke of Wellington's Regiment, who was accidentally drowned on the 11th August whilst bathing in France. A letter from his officer (Lieutenant W. E. Horsley) states:-
"He was seen to be in difficulties, and several attempts were made to get him out, but without success. His body was recovered after the lapse of about six minutes from the moment he first sunk, and artificial respiration was applied for an hour without avail. His death cast a deep gloom over the whole company, it was so unexpected. He was exceedingly well liked by all ranks, and we all unite in offering you our deepest sympathy at such a tragic occurrence."
Private Alton, who was 22 years of age, had been twice wounded. He joined the Army in February, 1915, and had four brothers serving, one of whom (Private Ernest Alton, who recently won the Military Medal) was wounded in July, and is still in hospital in France.

rticle Date: 15 August 1919
ALTON - In loving memory of Private George Herbert Alton (2/6th Duke of Wellington's), who was drowned in France 14th August, 1918.
Rest well, dear brother, for at the great awakening,

When Christ shall call his soldiers to his side,

His promise stands, there shall be no forsaking

Of those who fought for Him, and, fighting, died.
From his sorrowing Brothers and Sisters, Barnoldswick.

Article Date: 06 December 1918
ALTON - Dec. 1, at Hartley Street, Barnoldswick, aged 59, Elizabeth Alton.

[Mother of Pte. George Herbert Alton.]

And if you think thats long, wait till you see the first of the Rohilla victims!



Edited by - thomo on 28/10/2011 4:55:03 PM


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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 28/10/2011 : 16:42
And the second one.

Surname: ANDERSON

Forename(s): Roland

Place of Birth: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Residence: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Service No: M/376299

Rank: Private

Regiment/Corps/Service: Army Service Corps

Battalion/Unit: 604th Horse Transport Coy (attd. XV Corps Heavy Artillery)

Division: not applicable

Age: 20

Date of Death: 1918-07-29

Awards: -----

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: V. D. 16.

CWGC Cemetery: LONGUENESSE (ST. OMER) SOUVENIR CEMETERY

CWGC Memorial: -----

Non-CWGC Burial: -----

Comments:

-----

 

 

Craven's Part in the Great War Entry:

PRIVATE ROWLAND ANDERSON, A.S.C., M.T., son of Mr. & Mrs. Fred Anderson, 28, Lower North Avenue, Barnoldswick, died in hospital in France from injuries received by being accidentally knocked down by an ambulance July, 1918. Aged 20 years.

 

West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record Entry:

ANDERSON, Rowland, aged 20, A.S.C., Lower Avenue, [Barnoldswick], died France.

Data from Soldiers Died Records

Surname: ANDERSON

Forename(s): Roland

Born: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Residence: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Enlisted: Leeds, Yorkshire

Number: M/376299

Rank: Private

Regiment: Army Service Corps

Battalion: -----

Decorations: -----

Died Date: 1918-07-29

Died How: Died

Theatre of War: France & Flanders

Notes: -----

Article Date: 09 August 1918
BARNOLDSWICK - KIND ACTION RESULTS IN DEATH
News came to hand at the weekend of the death of Private Roland Anderson, A.S.C. (M.T.), as the result of an accident in France. He was knocked down by an ambulance while performing an act of kindness to another man and died the same day from his injuries in the Red Cross Hospital at Lanqueness. Private Anderson was 20 years of age and the son of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Anderson, 28 Lower North Avenue, Barnoldswick. He had been previously wounded and last year was in England several months with trench fever. Before joining up he worked for Mr. Anthony Carr, Crow Nest Shed.

Article Date: 30 July 1920
ANDERSON - In loving memory of Pte. Rowland Anderson, A.S.C. (M.T.), who died in France, July 30th, 1918, aged 20 years.
I who loved you sadly miss you

As it dawns another year,

In the lonely hours of thinking

Thoughts of you are ever near.
From Belle.



Edited by - thomo on 28/10/2011 4:56:01 PM


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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 28/10/2011 : 17:04
And now the big one:-

Divisional Sign/Service Insignia: not applicable - Royal Navy
Main CPGW Record

Surname: ANDERSON

Forename(s): William Edward

Place of Birth: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Residence: -----

Service No: M/10066

Rank: Senior Reserve Attendant

Regiment/Corps/Service: Royal Naval Auxiliary Sick Berth Reserve

Battalion/Unit: H.M.H.S. 'Rohilla'

Division: not applicable - Royal Navy

Age: 23

Date of Death: 1914-10-30

Awards: -----

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: 8

CWGC Cemetery: -----

CWGC Memorial: CHATHAM NAVAL MEMORIAL

Non-CWGC Burial: -----

Comments:

No entry in SD - Navy.

1901 Barnoldswick Census: William E. Anderson, aged 10 years, born Barnoldswick, son of Ralph and Jane E. Anderson.

Cousin of Henry Wakefield (1069745).
 

Craven's Part in the Great War Entry:

PTE. W. ANDERSON, 20, School Terrace, Barnoldswick, single.

 

West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record Entry:

ANDERSON, W., 20, School Terrace, [Barnoldswick], single. The above resided at Barnoldswick, being a member of the local branch of the St. John Ambulance Association, who were drowned when the 'Rohilla', a hospital ship on which they were serving as members of the Naval Sick Berth Reserve, went ashore at Whitby on October 30, 1914.

Article Date: 07 August 1914
BARNOLDSWICK NEWS - LOCAL EFFECTS OF THE WAR
Sick Berth Reservists Called up - The Naval Reservists Called up
Mr. J.W. Thompson, the local superintendent of the Royal Naval Sick Berth Reserve, first received warning of the likelihood of his men having to serve their country in a telegram he received on Sunday from the Chief of the First Aid Department, Chatham, stating that all men had to be in readiness to leave the town on short notice. The message was ratified by a further wire received from the same department on Monday morning saying that sixteen men had to leave at once for Chatham. The following men were chosen:- Corporal M. Birtwhistle [Birtwistle], Private T. Petty, Sergeant A. Petty, Privates T. Horsfield, W. Horsfield, A.C. Elsworth, J.T. Pickles, A. Waterworth, H. Hopkinson [Hodkinson], R.W. Eastwood, F. Reddihough, W.E. Anderson, Wilfred Lord, F. Durkley [Dunkley], H. Barter, and Corporal W.J. Daly.

The men were at once informed of their summons, and all presented themselves on the station platform for departure by the 12-8 p.m. train. The news of the summons had quickly spread, and a large crowd assembled on the platform to see them off, a crowd whose feelings were in strange comparison to those when the same train steamed out of the station a week before bound for Blackpool and Morecambe. People stood in small groups discussing the events, some, it is true, laughing and talking, but others realising the grave import of the summons and waiting anxiously for the Premier's statement to be given in the House that afternoon.
The Departure
Prompt to the time the train whistle blew and the engine steamed out. A faint cheer was raised and a couple of detonators on the line served to emphasise the fact that if the worst come to the worst Barnoldswick would regard its first contingent of defenders with pride and welcome them back in more happy times. Here and there a woman was weeping, and even the more optimistic of the motley gathering had realised that their humour was ill-timed. Eagerly the train was watched down the line, and a farewell was bidden to Barnoldswick's representatives 'at the front.'

am Edward ANDERSON main record
Article Date: 06 November 1914
BARNOLDSWICK'S WEEK OF GLOOM - THE WRECK OF THE ROHILLA: THRILLING STORY
THREE OUT OF 15 LOCAL AMBULANCE MEN SAVED
This week has been one of the saddest that has ever been experienced by Barnoldswick people, for by the loss of the hospital ship, Rohilla, on the Whitby Coast, twelve gallant ambulance men out of fifteen who left the town on the outbreak of war have been lost. It is a sad story, but one, nevertheless, which will send a thrill of pride through succeeding generations when the story is related in years and years to come.
When war was announced these fifteen men, relinquishing their wives and families and all of them the comforts of home life, left home and joined the Royal Naval Auxiliary Sick Berth Reserve, being drafted to Chatham Naval Barracks. It is clear that subsequently they joined the Rohilla hospital shop, which plied between France and this country, carrying sick and wounded soldiers. The ship was making a return journey to France and struck a rock in Whitby Bay, 150 of the 229 souls on board being saved. Out of the fifteen Barnoldswick men on board only three were saved - a terrible low percentage.
Every now and again a dim light wagging hither and thither fitfully in the darkness indicates that they are still there, summoning feebly the assistance that those on shore cannot give.
THE STORY OF THE WRECK
The Rohilla was bound for Dunkirk, whence it was to bring British and Belgian wounded to this country. A full complement of doctors and ambulance workers were on board, including four female nurses, who are among the rescued. Exactly how she came to be so close in shore is not clear, but it is known that she passed within hailing distance of the pier head at four o'clock on Friday morning,
The sentry there tried to warn her, but his shouts were unheard, and ten minutes later she went aground under the cliffs. A very heavy sea was running, rain was falling in torrents, the night was pitch dark and a gale was blowing from the sea. The elements, in fact, seemed almost to have conspired for the Rohilla's downfall, and from the first it was certain that a heavy death toll could not be avoided. Signals of distress brought the lifeboat crew and rocket brigade hurrying to the shore, but willing as the rescuers were, they could do nothing until the sea fell slightly with the arrival of daylight. By that time several bodies had been washed ashore. Although the storm had abated somewhat the waves were still running so high that it was impossible to take the lifeboat out of the harbour mouth, and with great difficulty it was dragged along the shore to a point opposite the wreck. In the meantime one of the Rohilla's lifeboats, manned by the second officer and a crew of five, had come ashore with a line, but before communication could be established the line was broken by the force of the waves. All the remaining boats on the wreck had been either smashed or carried away, and the crew was powerless to make a second attempt. Two journeys were made to the wreck by the lifeboat, and two boatloads of nurses, stewards, and attendants were brought ashore. The lifeboat, however, was so badly battered that a third journey was impossible.
A second lifeboat was in the town, and as it was not possible to bring it along the shore, it was brought to the top of the cliff and lowered the two hundred odd feet down the almost perpendicular face of the cliff to the water - a feat probably unparalleled in the history of the Lifeboat Institute. Unfortunately when the boat had been lowered nothing could be done. The crew was anxious to man it and attempt the voyage, but it was realised that to do so would inevitably mean a further and useless waste of life. The Rohilla broke in two soon after she was struck, and at intervals during the day bodies were washed ashore.
MOTOR LIFEBOAT TO THE RESCUE
The last scene of this grim tragedy was a happy one. In the early hours of Sunday morning the fifty benumbed and starving people who still remained on board were rescued by a motor lifeboat, from Tynemouth, and were landed safely in Whitby harbour. Altogether, out of some 230 people who were on board when the Rohilla struck, 150 were saved alive. The rest were drowned or died from exposure. Many of the fifty people who were brought ashore on Sunday morning were in a pitiable condition. Clad only in their night attire, they had been exposed to the full fury of the elements since the ship struck, and they had had neither food nor drink to sustain them. Perched on the shoulder of one of them was a tiny wet bundle of fur, a kitten, sister to that which was brought off in the lifeboat on Friday.
THE NEWS IN BARNOLDSWICK
Our Barnoldswick representative writes:
By the loss of twelve lives out of the fifteen, which went from Barnoldswick to serve in an ambulance capacity upon the ill-fated hospital ship Rohilla, Barnoldswick as a town has this week suffered the greatest shock that the war has yet imposed. Local hardships caused by trade depression, anxieties about the welfare of loved ones serving their country in whatever capacity, could be born with fortitude, but the loss of twelve brave and well-known townspeople is a disaster that cannot so easily be overcome. It is only a short three months since the war began, and fifteen members of the Royal Naval Sick Berth Reserve left the town to take their part in the very necessary ambulance work, of which, alas, there has been plenty.
Of the fifteen men, only three, Privates Fred. Riddiough, Anthony Waterworth and W. Eastwood, have been saved alive from the wreck. The body of Private W. Barker was recovered dead, and all the rest are missing. It is presumed that they were drowned in the highest severity of the storm.

THE FIFTEEN

The Saved
Private W. Eastwood (married, two children), 8 Powell Street

Private Anthony Waterworth (single), North View Terrace

Private Fred Riddiough (single), 13 Ribblesdale Terrace
Missing or Dead
Sergeant Arthur Petty (married, one child), 2 Bracewell Street. Mr. Petty was secretary of the Barnoldswick Association
Corporal Birtwhistle (married, one child), 19 Clifford Street
Corporal W.J. Dalby (married, six children), 32 Westgate
Private Tom Petty (married, three children), 11 Coronation Street
Private H. Barter (married, no children), 41 Skipton Road
Private Tom Horsfield (married, seven children), 33 Heath View
Private Walter Horsfield (single), 7 Essex Street
Private Alfred Elsworth (single), 32 Wellington Street
Private J.T. Pickles (married, one child), Federation Street
Private H. Hodkinson (single), 14 Bank Street
Private W. Anderson (single), 20 School Terrace
Private T. Dunkley (married, one child), 9 Bairstow Street
When the ship struck most of the Barnoldswick men were asleep, or trying to sleep, in their bunks. An interesting account of his experiences is given below by Private Fred Riddiough, one of the saved, in a letter to Barnoldswick, and these were similar to the experiences of Private Anthony Waterworth, who was taken away in the lifeboat at the same time as his companion. Private Riddiough's account is given below.
PRIVATE FRED RIDDIOUGH'S EXPERIENCES
In a letter to Barnoldswick, dated October 31st, Private Fred Riddiough, who was one of the few Barnoldswick men saved from the wreck, gives a simple but comprehensive account of his personal experiences when the ship struck, and of the manner in which he made good his escape. He says:-
"We were sailing down the East Coast bound for Dunkirk in France, on Thursday night. It was one of the roughest nights we have had since we have been away. The wind was blowing the ship everywhere it wanted. We could not get to sleep. At about 4 o'clock the following morning the ship shook from stern to stern. We all 'nipped' out of bed, and the water was pouring down the hatches in torrents. When I got out of bed I was ankle deep in water, so I slipped into my pants and grabbed a lifebelt and ran. When I got to the end of the line of bunks some bottles came dashing past, and cut one of my toes clean off, all but a bit of skin, and I was walking about like that for about four hours, so you can just think what I went through. When I got upstairs into the saloon passage it was full of water. I then went up some more steps onto the promenade deck, and then onto the boat deck. No sooner had I got onto the boat deck then I was swept off my feet about three times, the waves coming mountain high. Then I got hold of a ventilator along with some other chaps, when a wave came and swept us all off our feet right up against the rails. Then I was in about three feet of water trying to get my wind. I got up and got behind a boat out of the way of the waves, when I saw Tony just behind me. We went forward to get into the Marconi chap's cabin, and stayed there until daylight. The ship's doctor then came and said we had better get out of there as it was not safe. We took our chance (I was with Willie Anderson then, I had lost sight of Tony), and waited till a big wave had gone by, and then we 'nipped' forward into another cabin. Then I lost sight of Anderson, so I was on my own so far as out chaps were concerned. Well, I stayed in there for another hour and a half. There was a lifeboat coming alongside, and the Captain shouted "Women first". As you know, we had four Sisters and the stewards on board. Well, they got in with some more chaps, so I said to myself, "When that boat comes back I am for it". So I got onto the rail and waited for it to come back, and when it did come, I got hold of a rope and slid down into the lifeboat. A man pulled me in by the feet. When I looked up I saw Tony standing on the rail, so I sent the rope back, and Tony got hold of it and came down into the boat as well. I think we were the only two from Barnoldswick to get saved. I am now at the Cottage Hospital, Whitby, and have just had some relatives to see me. I am lucky to be here, I can tell you. I would not go through it again for a fortune. I think I shall be here for a while yet, and then I hope to get home on leave. "
From this communication one may gather some idea of the terrible night of anxiety, and the days of peril that followed, for it was not until Sunday that all the saved were removed from the ship. From the time the ship was struck, 4 a.m. on Friday, every possible endeavour was made by the crew to obtain communication with the shore, and when daylight illuminated the awful scene, various attempts were made by the Whitby lifeboat men to reach the doomed vessel. As Mr. Riddiough states, the ladies were taken ashore in the first lifeboat, whilst a number of men, including himself and Waterworth, departed when a second visit was paid.
HOW BARNOLDSWICK RECEIVED THE NEWS
The first news to reach Barnoldswick of the disaster was by means of a telegram from Waterworth, stating that he and Riddiough were amongst the saved, and it was feared that they were the only two of the local men to have made good their escape. Consternation was everywhere felt, and at once telephonic communication was entered into regardless of expense, by anxious relatives and friends, all of whom were keenly desirous of learning the fate of the remainder of the local Sick Berth Reservists. Suspense was maintained all the evening. The only consolation that was to be gained was the news that many people were known to be clinging to the week, and that these might include more 'Barlickers'. All the evening a crowd of people surged around the Post Office awaiting news that never came.

Already practical sympathy was being meted out to the relatives, and by the early train on Saturday morning a number of relatives left the town for the scene of the disaster. On Saturday and Sunday too, other people journeyed by rail, whist a number of local gentlemen kindly conveyed families by motor to Whitby.

On Saturday it became known that the dead body of Barter had been recovered, and later in the day came the welcome news that Eastwood had been saved. No more news regarding the fate of the Barnoldswick men was forthcoming, and on Wednesday morning the tale that had to be told was that only three of the local men had been rescued, that one body was recovered dead, and that the remainder were missing.
Throughout the week little bits of news had percolated from the scene of the disaster.
All the men, with the exception of H. Barter, who was a goods porter at the Midland Station, and T. Dunkley, a baker, were employed in the cotton trade. A story was circulated in the town regarding the fate of Barter. It is known that he was a good swimmer, and the report is that he essayed to swim ashore. After having been tossed about like a cork in the raging surf, the account is that he actually got his feet on land and had commenced to wade forward into safety when a huge wave dashed him backwards against some rocks, thus killing him before the rescuers, who rushed with ropes into the sea, could get near him. Barter was a Worcestershire man, and his wife, who left Barnoldswick during the weekend, has had his body conveyed to his native town, where it was interred, amidst local manifestations of sorrow and sympathy on Tuesday last. Mrs. Barter was staying with relatives in the south.
Lack of news regarding other Barnoldswick survivors extinguished the faint hopes that were held on Sunday and Monday for their safe recovery. Anxiety is still maintained regarding the recovery of the bodies.
NOT HOME YET
When the lifeboat landed Riddiough and Waterworth, they were taken to the Whitby Cottage Hospital, where they were visited by relatives and friends on Sunday. Eastwood was taken from the wreck by the Shields motor lifeboat upon its arrival. Various rumours have been circulated regarding the experiences of this survivor. One is to the effect that he jumped from the Rohilla into the sea, and was tossed back again by the huge wave, and another phase of the same story is that he attempted to swim to land, but was unable to make any headway in the raging storm, thus being assisted to regain the poor shelter and doubtful safety of the vessel itself. Whatever his actual experiences must have been, there can be no doubt that he has suffered terribly. He is at present detained at Whitby, where he has been seen by his brother, who went from Barnoldswick on Monday. Waterworth and Riddiough have been ordered to Chatham to report themselves upon recovery from shock and the injuries they sustained. It is probable that they will be permitted to return to Barnoldswick this weekend.
WATCHING FOR THE BODIES
No one has been more assiduous in seeking to alleviate suffering, arrange for the comfort of the survivors, and assist Barnoldswick people who have gone to Whitby, than Mr. J.W. Thompson, gas and water engineer, who is superintendent of the local Ambulance Division. Mr. Thompson got to Whitby on Monday, and at once wired to the Postmaster at Barnoldswick that none of the eleven bodies of the missing men had been recovered. In addition to giving evidence at the inquest, Mr. Thompson has kept Barnoldswick people posted with what news there was to send.
A telegram from him was placed in the window of the Post Office to the effect that 'Divers have volunteered and will search the submerged parts of the ship tomorrow (Thursday). Lifeboat has just returned from visiting the wreck. They did not find any bodies on it. The inside of the ship is washed out. Our eleven still missing.'
Rev. Matthew Hall, who was a member of the motoring party to the East Coast, in an interview said that thanks to Mr. Thompson and the people in charge of affairs at Whitby, he was convinced that everything that possibly could be done had been done to reach and rescue the shipwrecked. He had seen the storm, hardly abated even then, sweeping the middle portion of the ship, which appeared to have struck the rock amidships. The bows and the stern had gone. What was once a beautiful and palatial vessel was now a complete shattered mess. The decks were swept clean, and the people of Whitby had gleaned flotsam and jetsam of all kinds after each tide. Some bodies had been washed up. But they did not include any of the Barnoldswick contingency. Mr. Hall said it was a pitiful sight. There seemed to be an abundance of lifebelts, and it was his impression that early in the storm the boxes that contained these valuable, almost priceless, instruments at such a time, were washed away from their lashings.
From the accounts Mr. Hall had received the experiences of Private Barter were terrible. It was especially lamentable that after making so brave and considerable endeavour to reach the shore, where he would have been on the point of rescue, only to be dashed against the rocks and tragically killed. By all accounts his body was terribly mutilated.
PERSONAL JOTTINGS
Most of the missing men have been associated with Barnoldswick Ambulance Brigade for many years, and have since served in the Royal Naval Sick Berth Reserve, taking part in the annual training ----- of H.M. ships. The two Horsfields were brothers, and sons of Mr. James Horsfield, of Essex Street, a well-known Barnoldswick gentleman. Mr. T. Horsfield was a member of an ambulance corps during the South African War. Mr. Milton Birtwhistle is a son-in-law of Mr. James Marsh, a well-known member of the Skipton Board of ----- and his services were usually required whenever an accident took place.
Sergt. Arthur Petty was one of the best-known St. John Ambulance workers in the town, and Mr. T. Petty was actively associated with the Salvation Army.
Messrs. Waterworth and Riddiough, who were saved from the wreck, had seen the least amount of service. They held a reputation, along with Eastwood, who was also saved, of being especially keen on -----.
A portion of the wreckage of the Rohilla has been sent to Barnoldswick, and is being made into a frame by Mr. J. -----. to contain the Ambulance certificate of Private Dunkley, and will be preserved by the relatives as a memento of the departed.
PULPIT REFERENCES.
In every place of worship on Sunday, prayers were offered for the safety of the shipwrecked men during the period of suspense. Reference to the sad event was made at the Brotherhood meeting on Sunday afternoon, when Mr. John Heald, the chairman, said the Brotherhood, with whom some of the men were connected, desired to express their deep sympathy with the relatives and families of the men, who had sacrificed their lives whilst seeking to save and preserve the lives of others. A vote of condolence was passed, the congregation standing the while.

Mention was also made at the Baptist Chapel by Rev. E. Winnard. The man Elsworth, who is amongst the missing, was associated with the Bethesda Baptist Chapel, and reference to this and the shipwreck in general was sympathetically made by the Rev. W.H. Lewis. At the Wesleyan Chapel and the Primitive Methodist Church mention was also passed. The Church of England services also included special prayers for 'those in peril on the sea', and spiritual comfort of those at home.
A memorial service is to be held.
THE SCENE FILMED
Pathé Freres, the cinematograph producing firm, rushed a party of photographers and operators to the spot immediately they learned of the wreck, and Mr. Palmer, the proprietor of the Alhambra, has secured the excusive film rights of the wreck, and he will place it before Barnoldswick audiences this week. In the cinema, the picture suddenly turns shoreward, depicting the anxious but helpless crowd of spectators, who, regardless of the elements, have assembled to see the last of the ill-starred ship. Rescuers are seen at work, with long lifelines, rushing boldly into the surf, sometimes swept off their feet by the towering waters. The last scene is that of the sad procession of the dead. Rescuers are carrying one of the lifeless bodies from the shore.
THE WRECK OF THE ROHILLA: THE INQUEST - Ambulance Superintendent's Natural Request
At the inquest on Monday, John W. Thompson, superintendent of the Barnoldswick Ambulance Division, said that eleven of their division were not accounted for. Eight or nine were married men, whose families wished to get the bodies home, if they were recovered. The Admiralty had agreed to provide coffins but nothing further. He thought they should do more.
The Inquest was resumed at Whitby yesterday.
Captain Neilson, master of the Rohilla, was the principal witness. He said there were 229 persons aboard when the ship left the Firth of Forth on October 29 for Belgium to receive wounded. The next morning the weather became bad, and the ship rolled considerably. At the time of the disaster he and the chief officer were walking on the bridge. The chief officer said to the witness that the afterboats ware adrift owing to the rolling of the ship, and the witness said. "All right, Bond, I propose turning her off the land, as the weather is getting worse, and letting her dodge about." Before the result of the soundings was brought to him the ship struck, and the witness said, "My God." He ordered the engines full speed astern, and then full speed ahead, giving the helmsman the order hard-a-port. The helm was put so, and the engines went full speed ahead, to put the ship into the land, as his ship was wounded vitally. The ship went on, as far as he could judge, a good seven or eight minutes, and finally took the beach with a grating sound, when he stopped and waited for daylight to see where they were. He was still of the opinion that he struck a mine outside the rock. He certainly struck something outside the rock, and by the volume of sound he thought it was a mine. Describing the early lifeboat rescues, he said that four nurses and a stewardess were put in the first boat and three sailors who were onwards jumped into the boat. Afterwards his orders as to precedence were followed. On Saturday afternoon the position was so serious that he suggested that swimmers might try to get ashore. He watched the currents and directed those who made the attempt, and about thirty, he was told, reached the shore alive.
PLIGHT OF THE SURVIVORS
Subsequently he received a signal from the shore that a motor lifeboat was coming, and signaled back, "The ship is breaking rapidly, look out for swimmers, low tide tonight, no time to lose." He then called the hands together, told them he thought the ship could not hold out to daybreak, and advised them to make raft. Those remaining on board huddled together for warmth. They had no food or fire, and only a thimbleful each of water. Although the weather had moderated on Sunday morning when the motor lifeboat received them, he did not think an ordinary lifeboat could have reached the wreck.

The fourth officer also expressed the opinion that the ship struck a mine. One stated this he was knocked off his feet against a bulkhead, while another said the first shock was like being 'lifted up in a lift and being let down'.
The Coroner, in summing up, remarked that the war had deprived navigators of the benefits of lighthouses and shore lights in the North Sea.
The jury found that the ship struck 'something' before grounding, and that the master navigated the vessel in a seamanlike manner in exceptional circumstances, and was free from blame. They recommended the provision of rocket apparatus on passenger ships, and a motor lifeboat for Whitby. They also recorded their high appreciation of the conduct of the master, officers, and crew, and expressed sympathy with the relatives of the victims.

Article Date: 15 June 1917
A 'ROHILIA' MONUMENT AT WHITBY
A handsome stone monument has just been completed in Whitby Cemetery over the last resting place of 38 of the victims of the ill-fated hospital ship, 'Rohilla' in the wreck of which near Whitby on the 30th October, 1914, ninety-one officers and men (including twelve Naval Sick Berth. attendants from Barnoldswick), lost their lives. The monument has been erected by Messrs. Thos. Hill and Sons, of Whitby, to the order of the British India Steam Navigation Company (owners of the 'Rohilla') at a cost of over £200. From the 'Whitby Gazette' of last week (in which appears a photograph of the monument) we take the following description:-
"The monument is of the very best quality, West Yorkshire Slone, supplied by Messrs. Geo. Vint. and Brothers, Idle, Bradford, and occupies a central position over the nine graves. The square monument stands 9ft. 2in. high, the dimensions at the base being 4ft. by 4ft. An ornamental anchor, appropriately rests on the moulding towards the top on each of the four sides, while a 'rope' is effectively carved at each angle. The graves have been kerbed round and concreted, and covered with broken marble. The names of the unfortunate victims have been engraved on the four sides of the monument, and the completion of the work reflects in the highest credit upon all engaged in the erection of this handsome memorial."
The names of the Barnoldswick men are inscribed (with others) on the east panel as follows:-- W. E. Anderson, M. Birtwistle, W.J. Daly, A.C. Elsworth, H. Hodkinson, A. Petty, T. Petty, J.T. Pickles, H.J. Harker, F. Dunkley, T. Horsfield, W. Horsfield.
At the base of the front panel is the inscription:-
"I saw a new heaven and a new earth,

And there was no more sea."

And there are three pics, I will post them separately.

Image


Voila!!!

Edited by - thomo on 28/10/2011 9:13:51 PM


thomo Go to Top of Page
Callunna
Revolving Grey Blob


3044 Posts
Posted - 28/10/2011 : 21:28
Would that be H J Barter, not Harker?
The names of the Barnoldswick men are inscribed (with others) on the east panel as follows:-- W. E. Anderson, M. Birtwistle, W.J. Daly, A.C. Elsworth, H. Hodkinson, A. Petty, T. Petty, J.T. Pickles, H.J. Harker, F. Dunkley, T. Horsfield, W. Horsfield.


Here's a pic I took on my visit to Whitby a few years ago. I have quite a few different views, with details of the names, etc. Available if ever you needed them for whatever reason, Peter. The quality is better than appears here on OG.

Rohilla 1 

 

 

Edited by - Callunna on 28/10/2011 9:51:11 PMGo to Top of Page
thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 28/10/2011 : 22:01
Fortunately not my gaff Heather, its a Craven Herald updick! I am still plowing through the "B"s again and something truly terrible is emerging, and thats the number of recipients of bad news who died almost immediately, Mothers and Wives, truly horrific.


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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 29/10/2011 : 11:00


Main CPGW Record

Surname: ANDERSON

Forename(s): William Pullan

Place of Birth: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Residence: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Service No: 29830

Rank: Private

Regiment/Corps/Service: Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment)

Battalion/Unit: 'C' Coy, 9th (Service) Battalion

Division: 17th (Northern) Division

Age: 28

Date of Death: 1918-09-12

Awards: -----

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: II. D. 17.

CWGC Cemetery: SELRIDGE BRITISH CEMETERY, MONTAY

CWGC Memorial: -----

Non-CWGC Burial: -----

Comments:

from Soldiers Died Records

Surname: ANDERSON

Forename(s): William Pullan

Born: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Residence: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Enlisted: Halifax, Yorkshire

Number: 29830

Rank: Private

Regiment: Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment)

Battalion: 9th Battalion

Decorations: -----

Died Date: 1918-10-12

Died How: Killed in actionDate: 25 October 1918

Theatre of War: France & Flanders

Notes: -----

e Date: 25 October 1918
Barnoldswick Baptist Worker Killed
Pte. Wm. P. Anderson Duke of Wellington's Regiment, whose death in action on the 14th inst. reported in a letter from a N.C.O., was 29 years of age, and married. He enlisted two years ago and had spent twenty months in France. In his letter to Mrs. Anderson, Sergt. Oliver writes:- "We were advancing at the time, and I am sorry to say I could not stop to get any of your husband's belongings, but perhaps later someone will forward them on to you. He was hit in the head by a piece of shrapnel, and died almost immediately, suffering no pain whatever. As his platoon sergeant, I wish to express to you on behalf of the lads

and myself, our deepest sympathy in your hour of sorrow." Pte. Anderson was employed by Waller's, Ltd., Fernbank Shed, and along with his wife was an earnest worker in connection with the Bethesda Baptist Church, where sympathetic reference was made to the sad event by Rev. W.H. Lewis on Sunday.





Edited by - thomo on 29/10/2011 11:25:24 AM


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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 29/10/2011 : 11:36
Main CPGW Record

Surname: ANDREWS

Forename(s): Charles

Place of Birth: Blackburn, Lancashire

Residence: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Service No: 20596

Rank: Private

Regiment/Corps/Service: Devonshire Regiment

Battalion/Unit: 8th (Service) Battalion

Division: 7th Division

Age: 40

Date of Death: 1917-04-02

Awards: -----

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: Bay 4

CWGC Cemetery: -----

CWGC Memorial: ARRAS MEMORIAL

Non-CWGC Burial: -----

Comments:

from Soldiers Died Records

Surname: ANDREWS

Forename(s): Charles

Born: Blackburn, Lancashire

Residence: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Enlisted: Keighley, Yorkshire

Number: 20596

Rank: PrivateArticle Date: 20 April 1917

Regiment: Devonshire Regiment

Battalion: 8th (Service) Battalion

Decorations: -----

Died Date: 1917-04-02

Died How: Killed in action

Theatre of War: France & Flanders

Notes: -----

BARNOLDSWICK - KILLED IN THE GREAT PUSH
Pte. Charles Andrews, Devonshire Regiment, was killed in action in France on the 2nd inst. He was 40 years of age and leaves a wife and three children, residing at 55, Manchester Road, Barnoldswick. Before enlisting he was a weaver at Aldersley's, Butts Mill. He had been out in France a year. In a letter to Mrs. Andrews announcing the sad event, Capt. G.D. Loch writes:- "He died a noble death, fighting to the last, and by his bravery set an example to all his comrades. Officers and men of this Company send you their most sincere sympathy in your great loss. Your husband, by his cheerfulness and devotion to duty, had thoroughly endeared himself to all ranks."

Pte. Andrews was a native of Blackburn, and had resided in Barnoldswick 14 years.

Article Date: 05 April 1918
ANDREWS - In memory of Private Charles Andrews, late 8th Devons, who was killed in action on April 2nd, 1917, in France.
He nobly answered his country's call,

He gave his life for one and all,

But the unknown grave is the bitterest blow

None but an aching heart can know.
From his loving Wife and Family, 55, Manchester Road, Barnoldswick.


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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 29/10/2011 : 16:22
Here is the one we are going to look for at Ghyll, Anker W. "Definitely looks better that way round!!"

surname: ANKER

Forename(s): Wilfred

Place of Birth: Bacup, Lancashire

Residence: -----

Service No: L/9165

Rank: Gunner

Regiment/Corps/Service: Royal Field Artillery

Battalion/Unit: -----

Division: division unknown

Age: 24

Date of Death: 1918-08-00

Awards: -----

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: -----

CWGC Cemetery: -----

CWGC Memorial: -----

Non-CWGC Burial: BARNOLDSWICK, GILL UNDENOMINATIONAL BURIAL GROUND

Comments:

No entry in SD or CWGC - discharged soldier.

1901 Bacup, Lancashire Census: 20, Ernest Street - Wilfred Anker, aged 7 years, born Bacup, son of James and Mary Anker.

British Army WW1 Medal Rolls Index Cards: Gunner Wilfred Anker, L/9165, Royal Field Artillery.

Article Date: 27 November 1914
SKIPTON PETTY SESSIONS
OBSCENE LANGUAGE
Wilfrid Anchor, a weaver, of Barnoldswick, was summoned at the instance of P.C. Humphreys for using obscene language.
Witness said that he apprehended defendant in Long Ings Lane, Barnoldeswick, at 10 p.m. on Sunday, the 15th instant. Anchor was coming down the lane with two other youths and was shouting and making use of filthy language. He told him that he would be reported.
Fined 5s. and costs.

[This article is not proven to be referring to the future Gunner Wilfred Anker.]

Article Date: 23 August 1918
Barnoldswick Fatalities
The death took place last week at Keighley Military Hospital of Gunner Wilfred Anker, formerly of the R.F.A. Deceased, who was, 24 years of age, and married, was the son of Mr. James Anker, 9, Co-operative Street, Barnoldswick. He left the army nearly two years ago, after being gassed in France, for which he was treated in Bournemouth Hospital, obtaining his finaldischarge in October last, and resumed his occupation as a twister at Messrs. B. and E.W. Holden's, Moss Shed. The effects of the poison gas had, however, not been eradicated and on the advice of a specialist he was re-admitted to hospital where he died ten days later. The funeral took place at Gill Cemetery on Saturday afternoon.



Edited by - thomo on 29/10/2011 4:24:11 PM


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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 30/10/2011 : 11:29
I am still slogging through all of the extra stuff relative to this topic, and some truly amazing items are cropping up. The best I have seen yet is a series of newspaper reports culled from letters sent home, these will be appearing in due course, in particular watch out for J Bolton.


thomo Go to Top of Page
moh
Silver Surfer


6860 Posts
Posted - 30/10/2011 : 13:45
Apparently the TV programme Coast is doing a programme from Whitby and will be mentioning the Rohilla and interviewing the man who has written a book about it.  It will be shown sometime soon.


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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 30/10/2011 : 15:54
Surname: ASHTON

Forename(s): Colin

Place of Birth: Darwen, Lancashire

Residence: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Service No: 32886

Rank: Private

Regiment/Corps/Service: Royal Warwickshire Regiment

Battalion/Unit: 2/7th Battalion

Division: 61st (2/South Midland) Division

Age: 21

Date of Death: 1918-03-24

Awards: -----

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: Panel 18 and 19.

CWGC Cemetery: -----

CWGC Memorial: POZIERES MEMORIAL

Non-CWGC Burial: -----

Comments:

-----

 

 

Craven's Part in the Great War Entry:

PRIVATE COLIN ASHTON, Royal Warwick Regt., eldest son of Mr. & Mrs. Samuel Ashton, 41, Harrison Street, Barnoldswick, killed in action 24th March, 1918. Aged 21 years.

 

West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record Entry:

ASHTON, Colin, aged 21 years, R. Warwickshire Regt., 41, Harrison Street, [Barnoldswick], killed in action March 27, 1918.

Data from Soldiers Died Records

Surname: ASHTON

Forename(s): Colin

Born: Darwen, Lancashire

Residence: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Enlisted: Accrington, Lancashire

Number: 32886

Rank: Private

Regiment: Royal Warwickshire Regiment

Battalion: 2/7th Battalion

Decorations: -----

Died Date: 1918-03-24

Died How: Killed in action

Theatre of War: France & Flanders

Notes: Formerly 24779, HRS

 

 

ticle Date: 19 April 1918
Private Colin Ashton, Barnoldswick
Private Colin Ashton, Royal Warwicks, killed in action on March 24th, was the eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Ashton, 41 Harrison Street, Barnoldswick, and 21 years of age. Enlisting in February, 1916, he was wounded after 12 months' service in France, whither he only returned in the early part of last month. Before joining up he was employed by Mr. Bernard Eccleston, painter. He originally joined the 11th Hussars, but was transferred to the Warwicks on returning to the Front.

le Date: 28 March 1919
ASHTON - In loving memory of our dear son and brother, Private Colin Ashton, killed in France, March 24th, 1918.
However long our lives may last,

Whatever land we see,

And whatever joy or grief we have,

Till death we'll think of thee.
Always in the thoughts of his Father and Mother, Sister and Brothers, 41 Harrison Street, Barnoldswick.

 

Date: 19 April 1918
CRAVEN AND THE WAR
Barnoldswick Casualties
Pte. Colin Ashton, Royal Warwicks, killed in action on March 24th, was the eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Ashton, 41, Harrison Street, Barnoldswick, and 21 years of age. Enlisting in February, 1916, he was wounded after 12 mouths' service in France, whither he only returned in the early part of last month. Before joining up he was employed by Mr. B. Eccleston, painter. He originally joined the 11th Hussars, but was transferred to the Warwicks on returning to the front.
The death has been officially notified of Gunner Herbert Ewart Whipp, R.F.A., grandson of the late Mr. Wm. Baxter, 10, Rook Street. He was killed on March 26th. Though only 19 years of age, Gunner Whipp had been in France eight months. Before enlistment he worked for Messrs. Johnson Slater and Widdup, Barnsey Shed, and was a member of the Barnoldswick Orchestral Society and the Bethesda Baptist Church choir.
Corpl. Alexander Greenhalgh, R.F.A., killed in action on March 21st, leaves a wife and one child living at 23, Bolland Street, Barnoldswick. He was 29 years of age, a native of Blackburn, and had spent two years in France.


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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 30/10/2011 : 15:57
Surname: ATKINSON

Forename(s): Maurice Chester

Place of Birth: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Residence: -----

Service No: 476578

Rank: Gunner

Regiment/Corps/Service: Canadian Field Artillery

Battalion/Unit: 1st Brigade

Division: 1st Canadian Division

Age: 23

Date of Death: 1917-06-16

Awards: -----

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: -----

CWGC Cemetery: -----

CWGC Memorial: VIMY MEMORIAL

Non-CWGC Burial: -----

Comments:

No entry in SD - Canadian Forces.

1901 Barnoldswick Census: Maurice C. Atkinson, aged 7 years, born Barnoldswick, son of Edgar and Emma Atkinson.

Born 27 March 1894.

For additional information go to: http://www.vac-acc.gc.ca/remembers/sub.cfm?source=collections/virtualmem
 

Craven's Part in the Great War Entry:

SIGNALLER MAURICE CHESTER ATKINSON, Canadian Artillery, son of Mr. Edgar Atkinson, formerly of Church Street, Barnoldswick, killed in action 16th July, 1917. Aged 24 years.

 

West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record Entry:

ATKINSON, Signaller Maurice Chester, aged 24 years, Canadian Artillery, son of Mr. Edgar Atkinson, formerly of Church Street, [Barnoldswick], killed in action June 16, 1917.

Article Date: 07 January 1916
BARNOLDSWICK - A CANADIAN MILITARY WEDDING
The following report (from a Canadian paper) of the marriage of a former Barnoldswick resident will no doubt be of interest:-
"A very pretty wedding took place on Monday afternoon (November 29th) at St. Mary's Church, Oak Bay, Victoria, B.C., when Gunner Maurice Chester Atkinson, 5th C.G.A. Overseas Draft, only son of Mr. E. Atkinson, and the late Mrs. E. Atkinson, of 1635 Chandler Avenue, Victoria, was united in marriage to Jean Mary, only daughter of Sapper A. Cheetham, 6th C.E. and Mrs. A. Cheetham of 118 Wildwood Avenue, Victoria. The bride was attired in a military suit of Belgian blue, with picture hat of black velvet, trimmed with white plume, and carried a bouquet of white chrysanthemums. The bridesmaids were Miss Elsa Jones, Miss Nora Atkinson, and Miss Millicent Cook. Driver A. Greenaway, 5th C.G.A. Overseas Draft, acted as best man. Among the many presents received were a silver cake basket from the Guild of St. Agnes and a silver toast rack from the Women's Guild of St. Matthias' Church, Fone Bay. The bridegroom expects to leave shortly for the Front."

Gunner Atkinson, who has since arrived in England, is a grandson of Mr. William Atkinson, tailor and outfitter, Church Street.

Article Date: 03 August 1917
BARNOLDSWICK CANADIAN KILLED
Many of our Barnoldswick readers will learn with regret of the death of Signaller Maurice Chester Atkinson of the Canadian Artillery, who was killed in action in France on July 16th. The deceased, who was 24 years of age, was a native of Barnoldswick, being the son of Mr. Edgar Atkinson, formerly of Church Street, Barnoldswick, and a grandson of Mr. W.P. Atkinson. Seven years ago the family went out to British Columbia. Signaller Atkinson joined the 5th Canadian Regiment, and sailed for England in December 1915. A further spell of training followed in this country, and it was not until September of last year that he landed in France, where he passed unscathed through some of the fiercest battles, including the capture of Vimy Ridge. He leaves a young wife, to whom he was married but ten days before leaving Canada. During his stay in England, Signaller Atkinson paid two visits to his relatives in Barnoldswick, and renewed many of his former acquaintances.
He formerly attended the Nelson Technical School, and possessed considerable intellectual attainments. Prior to going to Canada, where he was engaged in electrical engineering, he developed a marked musical talent, and was successful in passing the Trinity College Examination with honours.
Mr. Alban Atkinson, uncle of the deceased, has received the following letter from Major Blue, of the Canadian Field Artillery:- "Your enquiry with reference to Gunner M. C. Atkinson arrived today. I regret to have to say that he was killed in action on July 16th. His work while with the battery was most excellent, and he was one of the finest signallers we had. We all miss him, as his cheerfulness even under the most trying circumstances was wonderful. Permit me to offer you the sincere sympathy of the Battery in your bereavement. He was killed instantly by a shell which burst near him, and was buried with the rites of his Church and a cross


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panbiker
Senior Member


2301 Posts
Posted - 30/10/2011 : 16:44
It was a nice afternoon so I decided to make a start on my re-orientation of Ghyll Cemetery and Churchyard. As usuall I started at the bottom of the undenominational section as this is the order my notes are arranged in. I start at the bottom and work upwards, right and left of path then centre, then left centre and right at the top end up to the lane.

I know we are going to have a joint effort at finding him next week but I was keeping an eye out for Wilfred anyway. I did not find Wilfred but did manage to find another six local lads that were not on my existing list.

Pte Robert Heaps - East Lancs Regiment

Gunner Arthur Sneath - Royal Field Artillery

Pte Eddie Leeper - Highland Light Infantry

Trooper Charlie Valentine Thornton - Dragoon Guards

Trooper Thornton is actually interred at Havrincourt in France but commemorated on the family headstone.

Pte John Henry Holden - Duke of Wellingtons (West Riding) Regiment

Pte George Greenwood - Royal Field Artillery

I have cross referenced these with Peter's data from CPGW and added them to my list. They will all receive a remembrance cross now I know where they are.

 


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