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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted -  11/10/2011  :  15:24
Khaki in colour and sombre in content. "Cravens Part in the Great War", there will not have been many households in Barlick and what was then a much larger Craven Area, that did not have at least one copy of this book. In my immediate Family there would have been at least four and I still have two of them, albeit that one is with my son on Anglesey. Over the years I have seen them at jumble sales, in second hand shops and in piles of rubbish for disposal, even left behind when a house has been vacated. They will have turned up all over the place, I have come across them in Wales, the Isle of Wight and Hampshire, the two that I have belonged to my Father and Maternal Grandfather.
Many years ago I went through one of them from cover to cover noting those from Barlick who had given their lives in the service of King and Country, my notes are long gone so I am going to do it again, a few pages at a time, but this time I will include other local places within an approximate seven mile radius, Gisburn, Foulridge, Earby and so on. I will post my findings on here with the name, address and a precis of other details, as some are quite extensive, each name is to have the page number for my reference so that if anyone wants further information, I can soon find it. In a good number of cases there is a photograph, these I will copy and post in groups of ten at suitable intervals. In the book there are 391 pages so I will use a few abreviations hopefully all self explanatory, ie, KIA:- Killed in Action. MPD:- Missing presumed Dead. DOW:- Died as a result of Wounds, and one that is all too frequent, DFD:- Died from Disease or Illness.
One Man was responsible for the existance of these books and that was Mr, Walter Morrison Esq, JP of Malham Tarn who put forward the idea of the book and defrayed the entire cost.
There is quite a bit about the war itself up to page 50, including the Rohilla Tradgedy, then comes the dreadful list of those who did not come home, and so it is that on page 57 we find the first of Barlicks Sons, and is as follows:-

2nd Lieut Harry Thornton Pickles, 3rd Bn Duke of Wellington's (West Riding) Regiment (SR) second son of Mr Stephen Pickles JP, CC, Of Raysgill Barnoldswick KIA 26th April 1916 aged 26. P57.

In these first ten pages the extent of family loss is made very clear for it was in the Village of Carleton nr Skipton that this comes up:-

P53,  Lieut. Anthony E.K. Slingsby, 1/6th Duke of Wellington's (WR) Regiment, Son of Mr and Mrs J A Slingsby Carla Beck Carleton. KIA France 14th July 1915. Aged 26.
P57,  Captain Arthur Morris Slingsby, MC 56th Punjabi Rifles,  2nd son of Mr and Mrs J A Slingsby KIA 8th March 1916 in Mesopotamia. Aged 30.
P58.  Lieut. Stephen Slingsby of HMS Defence, 4th son of Mr and Mrs J A Slingsby. KIA in North Sea June 1916. Aged 24.
This out of a total of five sons all serving.
 
Lothersdale is the next local Village with on P62.  Lieut Alec Wilson, 1st Herefordshire Regiment, Son of Mr and Mrs F J Wilson JP of Lothersdale. KIA 26th March 1917 in Egypt.
P54, Lieut. The Hon, C. A. Lister Royal Marines, Hood Battalion, Only surviving son and heir of Lord Ribblesdale of Gisburne Park DOW 28th August 1915. Elder Brother killed in 1904 in Somaliland.
Greystones, Gisburn.  Lieut. George Proctor, Lancs Fusiliers, only son of Mr and Mrs Thomas Proctor. KIA 7th April 1918 aged 24. P70.
Marton is on P73, Which Marton is not clear,  2nd Lieut, Joseph Bryan Bushby South Staffs Regiment, son of Mr and Mrs Joseph Bushby, Schoolhouse Farm Marton, DOW, 4th October 1918 aged 26.



Ed

Edited by - thomo on 11/10/2011 4:05:43 PM


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Another
Traycle Mine Overseer


6250 Posts
Posted - 18/11/2011 : 11:08
What a well written letter from James Beaumont to Pte James Francis' widow. Nolic


" I'm a self made man who worships his creator" Go to Top of Page
thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 18/11/2011 : 13:49
Very true Nolic, and whoopee, I now have a match for all of the 285 names on our Memorial. So now to look at why I have another 39 that are not!!!


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Another
Traycle Mine Overseer


6250 Posts
Posted - 18/11/2011 : 14:11
Well done and go for it. Nolic


" I'm a self made man who worships his creator" Go to Top of Page
thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 19/11/2011 : 10:21
Surname: GELDARD

Forename(s): Charles Henry

Place of Birth: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Residence: -----

Service No: 24884

Rank: Private

Regiment/Corps/Service: Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment)

Battalion/Unit: 8th (Service) Battalion

Division: 11th (Northern) Division

Age: 31

Date of Death: 1917-08-27

Awards: -----

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: Panel 82 to 85 and 162A.

CWGC Cemetery: -----

CWGC Memorial: TYNE COT MEMORIAL

Non-CWGC Burial: -----

Comments:

1911 Barnoldswick Census: 34, Rainhall Road - Charles Henry Geldard, aged 24 years, Born Barnoldswick.

Craven's Part in the Great War Entry:

PRIVATE C. H. GELDARD, Duke of Well.'s Regt., of 22, Wellington Street, Barnoldswick, killed in action 28th August, 1917. Aged 31 years.

 

West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record Entry:

GELDARD, C.H., aged 31 years, Duke of Wellington's Regiment, 22, Wellington Street, [Barnoldswick], killed in action Aug. 28, 1917

Article Date: 07 September 1917
BARNOLDSWICK - MISSING
Private Charles Henry Geldard, Duke of Wellington's, whose wife and three children reside at 22, Wellington Street, Barnoldswick, has been reported missing. The news came in a letter from Private F. Lofthouse, a Barnoldswick comrade, in the same regiment. Private Geldard is the son of Mr. and Mrs. James Geldard, 17, Bethel Street. He is 30 years of age and went to France on January 1st.

Article Date: 21 September 1917
GELDARD - August 28th 1917, killed in action on the Western Front, Private C. H. Geldard, Duke of Wellington's Regiment, husband of Mrs. Geldard, 22, Wellington Street, Barnoldswick. Private Geldard, who was 31 years of age, leaves three children. He went to France in January last. Before enlisting he was employed as a weaver by the Monkwell Manufacturing Co., Calf Hall Shed.

.

Article Date: 21 September 1917
BARNOLDSWICK - MISSING, NOW BELIEVED KILLED
The following letter, received on Tuesday evening by Mrs. Geldard, 22, Wellington Street, Barnoldswick, gives ground for the worst fears in regard to the fate of her husband, Private C. H. Geldard, Duke of Wellington's Regiment, who we reported missing a fortnight ago:-
In the Field, September 14th, 1917
"Dear Mrs. Geldard, - I deeply regret to say that enquiries I have made point to the fact that your husband, Pte. C. H. Geldard, of my Company, was killed instantaneously by enemy shellfire in the early morning of August 28th whilst on his way to the dressing station. He had already been wounded in the ankle. I imagine that my own sincere sympathy, of which I assure you can do little to lessen your great sorrow, but I know you will find some consolation in the knowledge that your husband died as a brave soldier, and without suffering.


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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 19/11/2011 : 10:23
Surname: GIBSON

Forename(s): Joseph

Place of Birth: Bradford, Yorkshire

Residence: Morecambe, Lancashire

Service No: 236103

Rank: Sergeant

Regiment/Corps/Service: Prince of Wales's Own (West Yorkshire Regiment)

Battalion/Unit: 2/5th Battalion

Division: 62nd (2/West Riding) Division

Age: 31

Date of Death: 1917-11-28

Awards: -----

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: V. B. 9.

CWGC Cemetery: ROCQUIGNY-EQUANCOURT ROAD BRITISH CEMETERY, MANANCOURT

CWGC Memorial: -----

Non-CWGC Burial: -----

Craven's Part in the Great War Entry:

SERGEANT JOSEPH GIBSON, West Yorks Regt., formerly on the Police Force at Barnoldswick, died of wounds 22nd November, 1917. Aged 31 years.

 

West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record Entry:

GIBSON, Sergeant Joseph, aged 31, West Yorkshire Regiment, Colne Road, died of wounds Nov. 22, 1917


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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 19/11/2011 : 10:25
Surname: GILL

Forename(s): Albert Price

Place of Birth: Nelson, Lancashire

Residence: -----

Service No: 105963

Rank: Private

Regiment/Corps/Service: Royal Army Medical Corps

Battalion/Unit: 2nd Field Ambulance

Division: 1st Division

Age: 25

Date of Death: 1918-11-13

Awards: -----

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: III. D. 5.

CWGC Cemetery: PREMONT BRITISH CEMETERY

CWGC Memorial: -----

Non-CWGC Burial: -----
Craven's Part in the Great War Entry:

PRIVATE ALBERT P. GILL, R.A.M.C., of Barnoldswick, died of pneumonia in France 13th November, 1918. Aged 25 years.

West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record Entry:

GILL, Albert Price, aged 25 years, R.A.M.C., son of Mr. and Mrs. J.E. Gill, 152, Gisburn Road, [Barnoldswick], died from pneumonia, France, Nov. 13, 1918. GILL, Albert Price, aged 25, R.A.M.C., 152, Gisburn Road, [Barnoldswick], died from pneumonia Nov. 13, 1918.

Article Date: 29 November 1918
BARNOLDSWICK - TWO SOLDIERS DIE FROM PNEUMONIA
Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Gill, 152 Gisburn Road, Barnoldswick, have been officially informed of the death of their only son, Private Albert Price Gill, R.A.M.C., which took place from pneumonia at a Casualty Clearing Station in France on the 13th inst., three days after admission. He had served at the Front 18 months. Before joining the Army he was employed by Messrs. Edmondson and Co. Fernbank. He was a member of the Barnoldswick Ambulance Association and connected with the Primitive Methodist Church. Private Gill was 25 years of age and unmarried

Article Date: 14 November 1919
GILL - In sacred memory of our dear nephew, Albert Price Gill, the dearly beloved and only son of John Eddie and Annie Gill, who died on November 13th, 1918, aged 25 years, and was interred at the Cemetery, Premont, France.
Not now but in the coming years,

It may be in the better land;

We'll read the meaning of our tears,

And there sometime we'll understand.
Too dearly loved to be forgotten.
From Uncles, Aunts, and Cousins, Lane Top, Bradley.


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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 19/11/2011 : 10:26
Surname: GOLDING

Forename(s): George A.

Place of Birth: Burnley, Lancashire

Residence: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Service No: 266285

Rank: Sergeant

Regiment/Corps/Service: Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment)

Battalion/Unit: 2/7th Battalion

Division: 62nd (2/West Riding) Division

Age: 41

Date of Death: 1921-11-26

Awards: M.M., Croix de Guerre, M.I.D.

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: -----

CWGC Cemetery: -----

CWGC Memorial: -----

Non-CWGC Burial: BARNOLDSWICK, GILL UNDENOMINATIONAL BURIAL GROUND

Comments:

No entry in SD - post-War.

Not identified in CWGC (post CWGC cut-off date).

British Army WW1 Medal Rolls Index Cards: Sergeant G. Golding, 266285, West Riding Regiment.

The battalion of George A. Golding was found in 'West Riding Territorials in the Great War,' (Laurie Magnus).

Article Date: 15 March 1918
BARNOLDSWICK - French Decoration for Barnoldswick Sergeant
The French War Medal has been conferred upon Sergeant George Golding, Duke of Wellington's Regiment, for conspicuous gallantry and devotion in the attack on Boulon Wood on 27th November last. A native of Burnley he was formerly a well-known footballer associated with the Accrington Club and later with the Barnoldswick United. He enlisted in the Duke of Wellington's three years ago, but did not go out to France until February of last year. Sergt. Golding is a married man, his wife and daughter residing at 34, Town head, Barnoldswick.

rticle Date: 02 December 1921
BARNOLDSWICK - War Hero's Death
The circumstances of the death of ex-Sergeant George A. Golding, of 34 Town Head, which occurred on Saturday after prolonged illness, are particularly sad. The deceased, who was 41 years of age, and leaves a widow and two children, was a native of Burnley, but had resided at Barnoldswick for many years. He followed the occupation of twister and loomer in the employ of Mr. G. Dethick Brown. Crownest Shed. His first introduction to the town was as a player for the old Barnoldswick United Football Club, of which he was captain when the team first won the Craven Cup. Enlisting in 'Kitchener's Army' in the early days of the war, he served right through to the end, and emerged from the struggle practically unscathed, notwithstanding his participation in some of the heaviest fighting. While serving as private in the Duke of Wellington's he received the Military Medal and the Croix de Guerre, was mentioned in despatches for gallant conduct during the battle at Bourlon Wood, and was promoted to the rank sergeant for bravery on the field. On his discharge from the Army with a temporary pension, he resumed his former occupation, but before long his health broke down and about 10 months ago he underwent an operation at Beckett's Park Hospital, Leeds. This did not result in recovery, and his pension in the meantime had been discontinued on the ground that his illness was not attributable to war service. Some time subsequent to his discharge from hospital it appears that Golding appealed to the Army Medical Commissioners for a re-examination, and by the irony of fate a communication granting this request came to hand on the day he died. Steps are now being taken with the object of securing a pension for the widow. The interment took place at Gill Cemetery on Wednesday afternoon, members of the Ivory Hall Working Men's Club acting as bearers. Wreaths were placed on the coffin from the Ivory Hall and the Discharged Sailors' and Soldiers' Club.


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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 19/11/2011 : 10:27
Surname: GRANT

Forename(s): William Henry

Place of Birth: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Residence: -----

Service No: 25513

Rank: Private

Regiment/Corps/Service: East Yorkshire Regiment

Battalion/Unit: 1/4th Battalion

Division: 50th (Northumbrian) Division

Age: --

Date of Death: 1918-06-07

Awards: -----

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: VII. B. 24.

CWGC Cemetery: COLOGNE SOUTHERN CEMETERY

CWGC Memorial: -----

Non-CWGC Burial: -----

Craven's Part in the Great War Entry:

PRIVATE WILLIAM HENRY GRANT, East Yorks. Regt., of 12, The Butts, Barnoldswick, died of wounds 7th June, 1918.

West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record Entry:

GRANT, Wm. H., East Yorkshire Regiment, 12, Butts, [Barnoldswick], died in Germany June 7, 1918.

Article Date: 28 June 1918
WOUNDED AND MISSING
Private William Henry Grant, East Yorks. Regiment, is a prisoner and has been wounded in the hip. He was captured on April 13th, after being in the trenches thirteen days. His wife lives at 12 Butts, Barnoldswick.

Article Date: 23 August 1918
Death of a Barnoldswick Prisoner in Germany
An official intimation reached Mrs. Grant, 12, Butts, Barnoldswick, last week-end of the death on June 7th of her husband, Pte. Wm. Hy. Grant, East Yorks. Regiment. He had only been in France about a fortnight when captured on April 12th, he having been wounded by rifle-shot on both sides, but in two letters received from him (the last dated May 15th) be wrote quite cheerfully and did not appear to think his wounds of a dangerous character. According to information received from a German source, Pte. Grant was buried at Cologne and was given a military funeral. He was formerly a weaver in the employ of Mr. Thos. Nutter, Calf Hall Shed.


thomo Go to Top of Page
thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 19/11/2011 : 11:22
I mailed Chris Foster yesterday to tell him about the success in matching all of the names, the reply:-
 

Well done Peter, I’m pleased you’ve got plenty out of the site. It proves to me that we were right in setting it up in the first place. If you need any help in the future and feel as though we might be able to help, don’t hesitate to ask.

Best Wishes

Chris



Edited by - thomo on 19/11/2011 11:22:35 AM


thomo Go to Top of Page
thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 19/11/2011 : 14:57
Surname: GREEN

Forename(s): Arthur

Place of Birth: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Residence: -----

Service No: 333429

Rank: Private

Regiment/Corps/Service: Highland Light Infantry

Battalion/Unit: -----

Division: division unknown

Age: --

Date of Death: 1917-09-06

Awards: -----

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: P. 4.

CWGC Cemetery: GILL UNDENOMINATIONAL BURIAL GROUND, BARNOLDSWICK

CWGC Memorial: -----

Non-CWGC Burial: -----

Comments:

Arthur Green may have been a member of either the 1/9th or the 2/9th (Glasgow Highland) Battalion Highland Light Infantry. At the time of his death the 1/9th were serving on the Western Front and the 2/9th in Ireland.

Craven's Part in the Great War Entry:

(Not in CPGW - CH entry 1917-09-14)

Article Date: 14 September 1917
GREEN - September 7th 1917, found drowned in the Leeds and Liverpool Canal at Skipton, Private Arthur Green, of 5, Powell Street, Barnoldswick.

Article Date: 14 September 1917
DISTRESSING TRAGEDY AT SKIPTON
Barnoldswick Soldier's Suicide
A distressing tragedy occurred at Skipton in the early hours of Friday morning last when a soldier from the War Auxiliary Hospital in Granville Street (Skipton and District Hospital) committed suicide in the Leeds and Liverpool Canal. The deceased was Private Arthur Green, of the Highland Light Infantry, and of 5, Powell Street, Barnoldswick. He was suffering from gastric ulcer, and he had been undergoing treatment at the Hospital since July last. His condition had varied, but the previous night he appeared much brighter. He was in charge of Miss Berry, a probationary nurse, who last saw the deceased about 2-40 on Friday morning when she passed through the ward. She noticed that Green did not appear to be asleep, and on returning about ten minutes later she found that deceased's bed was empty. She reported the matter to the Matron, and Miss Eggins roused several of the convalescent soldiers, who searched the grounds without success. Eventually, however, one of them found a pair of army socks on the allotments footpath adjoining the canal. The police were informed, and with the aid of grappling irons P.S. Pryke recovered the body from the centre of the canal. The body was conveyed to the hospital where Dr. Knight tried artificial respiration for half an hour but without avail. Dr. Knight had attended the deceased since August 28th. A few days previous to the event deceased was very ill and unconscious, but he rallied again and appeared to be progressing.
THE INQUEST
Mr. Edgar Wood (district coroner) conducted the inquiry at the Skipton Workhouse on Friday afternoon.
Probationer Nurse Berry said she was at present on night duty at he Skipton District Hospital, and had 34 parents under her care, including the deceased. None of them were seriously ill and did not require more attention than she could give them. The deceased had been under her care for the past six weeks and he was suffering from gastritis. She never thought there wasanything wrong with him mentally, but she believed he had worried about the chance of having to go abroad, and at seeing a man who had returned with the loss of his legs. Witness last saw him at twenty minutes to three that morning. He was in bed, but witness did not think he was asleep. She did not speak to him but went to another ward. On returning about ten or fifteen minutes later she at once noticed that he was missing, his bed being empty. There were nine other men in the ward, eight of whom she knew were asleep. She looked round for the deceased, and being unable to find any trace of him she reported the matter to the matron. It would have been easy for the deceased to get out of the hospital through the windows, but he had never done so before. He was a very quiet man, but she had not thought it necessary to call the doctor's attention to him. He had complained of a good deal of pain lately. She had found no letter. He was unconscious the previous Tuesday night and she at once called the matron, and she (witness) stayed with him.
James Green, 8, Low West Avenue, Barnoldswick, gave evidence of identification. He said his son enlisted about twelve months ago. In Judy he came home on ten days' sick leave and he was too ill to return. He was taken to the Skipton War Auxiliary Hospital. His son was never strong. Witness and deceased's wife saw him early on Tuesday morning in response to a special summons. He had been unconscious all the night. He stayed until 8 a.m., and his wife remained at the hospital all day. Witness never suspected that he would commit suicide, for he had never threatened to do such a thing. A cousin, however, did drown himself some time ago in the canal at Barnoldswick.
P.B. Pryke said he was informed that the deceased was missing at four o'clock that morning. He went to the hospital and was told that a pair of army socks bad been found in the allotments on the hospital side of the canal. It was quite near. Witness noticed that the grass leading direct from the path to the water was beaten down. He could not see any thing in the water, which gradually deepened from 2½ feet to 6 feet. He at once secured the grappling irons, and at 5-15 a.m. he recovered the body from the centre of the canal and right opposite where the socks had been found. He took it to the hospital and Dr. Knight tried artificial respiration but without success. The deceased was wearing a pair of trousers and a shirt. His legs and arms were quite free and he saw no signs of any struggle. Had the deceased got into the water accidentally he could have got out again had he wanted to.
Miss Eggins, the Matron, said that deceased was admitted to the hospital on July 7th. She had seen him every day since his admittance and she had never noticed that there was anything wrong with him mentally. He had not been seriously ill, but had an attack of unconsciousness the previous Tuesday morning. She had not a serious case in the hospital, and one nurse was quite sufficient to look after the whole of the 34 patients. She thought deceased was a morose sort of man and was not particularly sociable with the other patients. Witness heard a little before three o'clock that morning that the deceased was missing, and she at once telephoned for the doctor and to the police. Deceased could easily get out of the hospital, and his trousers would be close to him. All the other patients had said they never saw deceased get up.
Dr. Knight said he had been attending the deceased about ten days for gastritis On Tuesday he was unconscious, which he thought was due to a blood clot, but later he recovered. On Wednesday morning he complained of pain in the chest. He had never shown any sighs of insanity. Deceased had never said anything to him about going to the front. He was satisfied that deceased had died from drowning. He did not think it necessary to have a nurse in attendance on the patients all the time.
The jury found that the deceased committed suicide, but that there was not sufficient evidence to show the state of his mind at the time.
THE FUNERAL
The funeral of Pte. A. Green, whose untimely end under such distressing circumstances has evoked universal sympathy, took place on Monday afternoon at Gill Cemetery, and was attended by several of deceased's ward-mates from the Skipton Military Hospital. A short service was conducted at the house by the. Rev. A. Bradfield (Wesleyan Minister), who also officiated at the cemetery. Among the numerous floral tributes were wreaths from the matron and the staff of the Hospital and Messrs. Brigs Bros. (printers), deceased's former employers.


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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 19/11/2011 : 14:59
Surname: GREEN

Forename(s): Fred

Place of Birth: Earby, Yorkshire

Residence: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Service No: 13314

Rank: Company Sergeant-Major

Regiment/Corps/Service: Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment)

Battalion/Unit: 9th (Service) Battalion

Division: 17th (Northern) Division

Age: 30

Date of Death: 1916-07-07

Awards: D.C.M., M.I.D.

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: Pier and Face 6 A and 6 B.

CWGC Cemetery: -----

CWGC Memorial: THIEPVAL MEMORIAL

Non-CWGC Burial: -----

Comments:

Craven's Part in the Great War Entry:

COY. SERGT.-MAJOR FRED GREEN, D.C.M., Duke of Well.'s Regt., son of Mr. John Green, 13, Bolland Street, Barnoldswick, killed in action July, 1916. Aged 30 years.

 

West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record Entry:

GREEN, Company Sergeant Major Fred, D.C.M., aged 30 years, Duke of Wellington's Regiment, eldest son of Mr. John Green, Bolland Street, [Barnoldswick], killed in action in France, July 7, 1916.

 

Article Date: 26 November 1915
BARNOLDSWICK N.C.O.'s PROMOTION
Two other well-known Barlickers who have been visiting the town this week are Company Sergt.-Major Fred Green and Sergt. Frank Watson (Swedish drill instructor), both belonging to the 9th Duke of Wellington's, who went out to France at the beginning of July. The former, whose home is at 18, Bolland Street, was promoted on the field about two months ago, his predecessor being killed by a bullet in the neighbourhood of Ypres. Sergt. Watson speaks confidently of the British position in that hotly contested region, where our troops have gradually gained the upper hand. They have the measure of the enemy, he says, and can now reply with five shells to one. Still there is need for more men to man the trenches, which have latterly become so foul that it is well nigh impossible for the men to occupy them for more than 48 hours at a stretch. Even under this reduced period the number of men who suffer from 'trench foot' (a complaint akin to frost bite) is daily becoming larger on account of the severe weather conditions.
A MUSICAL INTERLUDE
Referring to his bosom friend Pte. Gilbert Snowdon (another Barlicker in the same regiment, now a bomb thrower), Sergt. Watson related an amusing incident. A few weeks ago Snowdon, who at the time of enlistment was a player in the Barnoldswick Brass Band, wrote to a friend at home requesting an old cornet to be sent out to him, with which to relieve the tedium of trench warfare. The instrument was duly forwarded and has answered the purpose admirably. One day he entertained his comrades with a number of patriotic and sentimental selections, including 'Home, Sweet Home', observing that the latter 'touched' his comrades in a tender spot, the soloist suddenly changed the tune to 'Has anybody seen a German Band?' The effect was almost instantaneous, for before he had got through the first verse there was a regular fusillade from the enemy trenches a short distance away, and a general stampede to cover on the part of Gilbert and his audience

A GERMAN TRENCH RUSE
Pte. John Wade, another Barnoldswick man in the 9th Duke's, who has been at home (Bethel Street) this week, said the Battalion were kept in reserve five days before the attack at Loos ready to march at a minute's notice. When they did move forward it was found that they could not arrive in time. The Germans in the first line trenches have their rifles fixed on tripods, each rifle being fitted with a periscopic sight that reduces the distance to about one tenth of the actual. "That is one reason," he said " why so many of our men have been hit in the head." One night our Scouts crept up to a first-line enemy trench and found it practically destroyed with the exception of one man to every 100 yards or so, who walked backward and forward pulling a trigger here and there as he passed in order to keep up the deception that the trench was fully manned. The bulk of their men were resting in dug-outs meanwhile. Pte. Wade is not impressed with the scenery of Belgium, though he admits that the cities - those that remain - are beautiful. As he came through ruined Ypres on his way home the Germans started shelling it on three sides, and another shell dropped on the station at Poperinge just as the train was leaving

.

Article Date: 31 March 1916
ANOTHER BARNOLDSWICK D.C.M.
According to a letter received a few days ago by Mr. Sam Green, Moorside Farm, Barnoldswick from his brother in France, Company-Sergt.-Major Fred Green, of the 9th Battalion Duke of Wellington's Regiment, has been awarded the D.C.M. He is a son of Mr. John Green, 13, Bolland Street, Barnoldswick, and has been at the Front since August last, but was home on leave shortly after Christmas. He is 30 years of age. The letter, which contains no details of the services for which the distinction has been awarded, runs as follows:-
"Thanks very much for the nice parcel which I have just opened, I have just come down from the trenches to our billet. I have been up to look round before taking the company up tonight. They seem very fair trenches and much quieter than those we have been used to. Probably we shall liven them up a bit when we get there. Our general doesn't believe in letting them rest too much. Well, I have got the D.C.M. all right, and am wearing the ribbon; but I expect to wait some time before I get the medal - most likely when some big General comes around when we are out for a rest. The weather is mending up beautifully and it is quite like summertime. I can see big things coming off round here before very long, and then we shall be over the top again and on our way to Germany.
"... (censored) is a very big place and in some parts not much damaged by shellfire. Many of the residents are still here and there are some big shops open where we can buy anything - but they often forget to make us pay. Well, that's about all this time. Remember me to all at Moorside and don't forget to tell Jack I shall be home again before long."

.

Article Date: 07 April 1916
BARNOLDSWICK'S THIRD D.C.M.
The accompanying portrait is of Company Sergeant Major Fred Green, 9th Battalion Duke of Wellington's Regiment, who, as announced last week, has been awarded the D.C.M. for conspicuous gallantry and ability.
"During operations (the official record states) he rendered great assistance to his company officers, and by his courage and example kept the men in good spirits."

Company Sergeant Major Green, who had been previously mentioned in despatches, is the third Barnoldswick man in the British Expeditionary Force upon whom the medal has been bestowed.

Article Date: 30 June 1916
BARNOLDSWICK'S FOURTH D.C.M.
Another Barnoldswick soldier, Sergeant James Bury, of the 1/6th Duke of Wellington's Regiment (grenade company), has been awarded the D.C.M. (for conspicuous gallantry). Sergt. Bury is the son of Mr. and Mrs. J. Bury, 6, East Parade, Barnoldswick. He went out to France in April 1915 with the rank of Corporal. The official announcement of the exploit, which earned him the coveted distinction, reads as follows:- "For conspicuous gallantry. When the enemy bombed a post of which he was in charge, causing some casualties, he stuck to the post and bombed the enemy back single-handed. This is not the first occasion on which he has shown great courage."
In a letter to his parents a few days ago Sergt. Bury writes:- "I have left the convalescent depot and am now at the base. You will no doubt know that I have got the D.C.M. There are a lot of the boys here - Dave Russell, and lots of my old bombers. I can see us having some fun when we get back up the line. I went in front of 'Bones' this morning and he is doping me with iron tonic or something like that, but I am marked 'active' and there isn't anything wrong with me. I have seen a lot of Barnoldswickers and they are all in the pink. I am going down the town if I get a chance before I renew my acquaintance with Fritz."

 

 

 

Sergt. Bury was, prior to the outbreak of war, a prominent member of the Barnoldswick Football Club, and worked as a weaver at Messrs. Dugdale and Dewhurst's Wellhouse Mill. One of his brothers is in the Coldstream Guards.
The previous holders of the Distinguished Conduct Medal are: Pte. Fred Bracewell, Sergt. P. B. Garratt and Quarter-Master Sergeant J. [F.] Green.

 

Article Date: 21 July 1916
A BARNOLDSWICK D.C.M. AMONGST THE KILLED
Mr. John Green, 13, Bolland Street, Barnoldswick, yesterday received official information of the death of his eldest son, Company-Sergeant Major Fred Green, D.C.M., 9th Battalion Duke of Wellington's Regiment ('C' Company), who was killed in action in France on the 7th inst. The news confirms that received from two Barnoldswick comrades, who wrote home a week ago. Sergeant-Major Green was 30 years of age.
Article Date: 20 October 1916
BARNOLDSWICK'S FIFTH D.C.M.
News is to hand that Pte. John Edward Pickup, son of Mr. and Mrs. James Pickup, Cherrydene, Barnoldswick, has been awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal. Pte. Pickup, who is 23 years of age, went out with the Duke of Wellington's in April 1915 as a stretcher-bearer, and is the third Barnoldswick stretcher-bearer to earn that distinction, the others being Sergeant P.H. Garratt and Pte. Fred Bracewell. Two other Barlickers in the same regiment who were awarded the D.C.M. were Co.-Sergt.-Major Green (since killed) and Sergeant James Bury.
In a letter acquainting his parents of the fact, Pte. Pickup says:- "I have just been presented with the D.C.M. ribbon, and I shall be receiving the medal very likely before long."

Before joining the Army he worked as a weaver at Messrs. Albert Hartley and Co.'s, Long Ing.

Article Date: 28 July 1916
THE LATE COMPANY-SERGEANT-MAJOR GREEN
The following letter (received too late for publication last week) from a Barnoldswick comrade in the 9th Battalion Duke of Wellington's Regiment, tells how Company-Sergeant-Major Fred Green, who was awarded the D.C.M. met his death. The writer is Lance-Corporal Frank Edmondson:- "I have just had time to write. I have once more come out of the battle without a scratch. I dare say you will have read all about the great offensive in which we were engaged. I have been very lucky. Sam Woodhead was wounded next to me, and three killed. Fred Green was wounded, he got killed by a shell while bringing him (Woodhead) down to the dressing station. W. Dacre and W. Boocock were also wounded, and a lad named Leach (all from Barnoldswick) was killed."
Happily the information in regard to Leach turned out incorrect, for though Sergt. Wm. Leach was officially reported killed, his wife, who resides at 7 Stewart Street, had received a letter from him a day or two previously saying he was at a casualty clearing station, having been struck on the head by a piece of shrapnel. Luckily it did not penetrate the bone.

"I am going on splendidly and very soon hope to see you in England."
Sergt. Leach joined the army soon after the outbreak of hostilities. He was a playing member of the Barnoldswick Football Club.

Miscellaneous information
9th (Service) Bn. Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment)

Fred Green was killed in action at Contalmaison, 7th July 1916.


thomo Go to Top of Page
thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 19/11/2011 : 15:00
Surname: GREEN

Forename(s): Howarth Ratcliffe

Place of Birth: Oldham, Lancashire

Residence: -----

Service No: 28619

Rank: Private

Regiment/Corps/Service: East Yorkshire Regiment

Battalion/Unit: 13th (Service) Battalion. (4th Hull)

Division: 31st Division

Age: 38

Date of Death: 1917-04-29

Awards: -----

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: South B. 3.

CWGC Cemetery: ALBUERA CEMETERY, BAILLEUL-SIRE-BERTHOULT

CWGC Memorial: -----

Non-CWGC Burial: -----

Comments:

The informal title of the 13th (Service) Bn East Yorkshire Regiment was the T'Others.

Craven's Part in the Great War Entry:

PRIVATE HAWORTH R. GREEN, East Yorks. Regt., of 33, Chapel Street, Barnoldswick, killed in action 29th April, 1917. Aged 38 years

West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record Entry:

GREEN, H.R., aged 38 years, East Yorkshire Regiment, 33, Chapel Street, [Barnoldswick], killed in action April 29, 1917.

Article Date: 18 May 1917
GREEN - Unofficially reported from France as killed in action on April 29th, 1917, Pte. Howarth R. Green, East Yorkshire Regiment, formerly of Barnoldswick Ambulance Division, aged 38 years.

Article Date: 18 May 1917
BARNOLDSWICK'S TOLL - PRIVATE HOWARTH R. GREEN
The death is unofficially reported from France of Pte. Howarth R. Green (East Yorkshire Regiment) who was killed in action on April 29th. A letter from a Barnoldswick comrade in the same Regiment (Pte. S. Windle) states that he was killed when going into the trench on the above date. Pte. Green was 38 years of age, and leaves a widow and boy of 10 living at 33 Chapel Street, Barnoldswick. He enlisted last August and went to France on January 1st. For eight years previous to joining the Army he was a valued member of the Barnoldswick Ambulance Division, and was employed as a weaver at Messrs. Ormerod's Ltd., Moss Shed.


thomo Go to Top of Page
thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 19/11/2011 : 15:01
Surname: GREENHALGH

Forename(s): Alexander

Place of Birth: Blackburn, Lancashire

Residence: Harwood, Lancashire

Service No: 8894

Rank: Corporal

Regiment/Corps/Service: Royal Field Artillery

Battalion/Unit: 'B' Battery 150th Brigade

Division: not applicable - Army Brigade

Age: 29

Date of Death: 1918-03-21

Awards: -----

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: Panel 7 to 10.

CWGC Cemetery: -----

CWGC Memorial: POZIERES MEMORIAL

Non-CWGC Burial: -----

Comments:

1891 Blackburn Census: Kemp Street - Alexander Greenhalgh, aged 1 year, born Blackburn, son of John and Margaret Greenhalgh [née Walsh].

1911 Blackburn Census: 44, Kemp Street - Alex Greenhalgh, aged 21 years, born Blackburn, son of John and Margaret Alice Greenhalgh [née Walsh].

British Army WW1 Medal Rolls Index Cards: Gunner Alexander Greenhalgh, L/8894, Royal Field Artillery.

Brother of William Greenhalgh (666715).

The photograph in CPGW for Alexander Greehalgh shows a soldier wearing the King's (Shropshire Light Infantry) cap badge: this is, in fact, a photograph of his brother William Greenhalgh.

Craven's Part in the Great War Entry:

CORPORAL GREENHALGH, R.F.A., of 23, Bolland Street, Barnoldswick, killed in action 21st March, 1918. Aged 29 years.

 

West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record Entry:

GREENHALGH, Bombadier Alexander, aged 29 years, R.F.A., 23, Bowland Street, [Barnoldswick], killed in action March 21, 1918

Article Date: 19 April 1918
Corporal Greenhalgh, Barnoldswick
Corporal Alexander Greenhalgh, R.F.A., killed in action on March 21st, leaves a wife and one child living at 23 Bolland Street, Barnoldswick. He was 29 years of age, a native of Blackburn, and had spent two years in France

Article Date: 19 April 1918
CRAVEN AND THE WAR
Barnoldswick Casualties
Pte. Colin Ashton, Royal Warwicks, killed in action on March 24th, was the eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Ashton, 41, Harrison Street, Barnoldswick, and 21 years of age. Enlisting in February, 1916, he was wounded after 12 mouths' service in France, whither he only returned in the early part of last month. Before joining up he was employed by Mr. B. Eccleston, painter. He originally joined the 11th Hussars, but was transferred to the Warwicks on returning to the front.
The death has been officially notified of Gunner Herbert Ewart Whipp, R.F.A., grandson of the late Mr. Wm. Baxter, 10, Rook Street. He was killed on March 26th. Though only 19 years of age, Gunner Whipp had been in France eight months. Before enlistment he worked for Messrs. Johnson Slater and Widdup, Barnsey Shed, and was a member of the Barnoldswick Orchestral Society and the Bethesda Baptist Church choir.
Corpl. Alexander Greenhalgh, R.F.A., killed in action on March 21st, leaves a wife and one child living at 23, Bolland Street, Barnoldswick. He was 29 years of age, a native of Blackburn, and had spent two years in France


thomo Go to Top of Page
thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 19/11/2011 : 15:02
Surname: GREENHALGH

Forename(s): William

Place of Birth: Blackburn, Lancashire

Residence: -----

Service No: 666715

Rank: Private

Regiment/Corps/Service: Labour Corps

Battalion/Unit: 255th Labour Coy

Division: not applicable

Age: 25

Date of Death: 1918-11-27

Awards: -----

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: -----

CWGC Cemetery: KEIGHLEY (MORTON) CEMETERY

CWGC Memorial: -----

Non-CWGC Burial: -----

Comments:

No entry in SD- post Armistice.

1901 Blackburn Census: 26, Primrose Hill - William Greenhalgh, aged 8 years, born Blackburn, son of John and Marg. Ann Greenhalgh [née Walsh].

1911 Blackburn Census: 22, Kemp Street - William Greenhalgh, aged 17 years, born Blackburn, nephew of Sarah Ann Abbott [née Walsh], husband of John Abbott.

British Army WW1 Medal Rolls Index Cards: Pte William Greenhalgh, 16713, King's Shropshire Light Infantry; and 666715, Labour Corps.

Brother of Alexander Greenhalgh (8894).

William Greenhalgh would have served in either the 2nd or 8th (Service) Battalion King's (Shropshire Light Infantry).

Craven's Part in the Great War Entry:

(Not in CPGW - CH entry 1918-11-29)

 

West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record Entry:

GREENHALGH, William, aged 25 years, Shropshire Light Infantry, 21, Colin Street, [Barnoldswick], died from pneumonia, Keighley, Nov. 21, 1919. GREENHALGH, William, aged 25, Shropshire Light Infantry, 21, Colin Street, [Barnoldswick], died from pneumonia.

Article Date: 29 November 1918
BARNOLDSWICK - TWO SOLDIERS DIE FROM PNEUMONIA
Private William Greenhalgh, Shropshire Light Infantry, died on Thursday last in Keighley Military Hospital from broncho-pneumonia. He joined up early in the war, and served a short time in France before going to Salonika, where during a stay of over three years, he had repeated attacks of malaria. Returning to England in August last he had since been identified with a labour unit. A fortnight prior to his decease he came home to 21 Colin Street, Barnoldswick, to visit his brother (who had been wounded in France) whom he had not seen for four years, and was taken ill and removed to Keighley hospital on Thursday afternoon last week, dying the same night. Private Greenhalgh was 25 years of age and a native of Blackburn. His brother, Private Alex. Greenhalgh, was killed in March last.

Article Date: 29 November 1918

Two Soldiers' Deaths from Pneumonia
Mr. and Mrs. J.E. Gill, 152, Gisburn Road. Barnoldswick, have been officially informed of the death of their only son, Pte. Albert Price Gill, R.A.M.C., which took place from pneumonia at a casualty clearing station in France on the 13th inst., three days after admission. He had served at the front 18 months. Before joining the army he was employed by Messrs. Edmondson and Co, Fernbank. He was a member of the Barnoldswick Ambulance Association, and connected with the Primitive Methodist Church. Pte. Gill was 25 years of age and unmarried.
Pte. Wm. Greenhalgh, Shropshire Light Infantry, died on Thursday last in Keighley Military hospital from broncho-pneumonia. He joined up early in the war, and served a short time in France before going to Salonica, where, during a stay of over three years, he had repeated attacks of malaria. Returning to England in August last, he has since been identified with a labour unit. A fortnight prior to his decease he came home to 21, Colin Street, Barnoldswick, to visit his brother (who had been wounded in France), whom he had not seen for four years, and was taken ill and removed to Keighley Hospital on Thursday afternoon last week, dying the same night. Pte. Greenhalgh was 25 years of age, and a native of Blackburn. His brother, Pte. Alex. Greenhalgh, was killed in March last.
Pte. Alfred Banks, Duke of Wellington's, news of whose death came to hand last week-end, was killed in action on the 1st inst. He went out with the 1st 6th Battalion in April, 1915, and had been wounded twice previously. He was 23 years of age and married, his wife residing at 15, Arthur Street, Sough Bridge, Earby. Before enlisting he worked for the East End Manufacturing Co., Sough Bridge. He was the eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. J.W. Banks, 20, Louvain Street, Barnoldswick.

Pte. Wm. Greenhalgh, Shropshire Light Infantry, died on Thursday last in Keighley Military hospital from broncho-pneumonia. He joined up early in the war, and served a short time in France before going to Salonica, where, during a stay of over three years, he had repeated attacks of malaria. Returning to England in August last, he has since been identified with a labour unit. A fortnight prior to his decease he came home to 21, Colin Street, Barnoldswick, to visit his brother (who had been wounded in France), whom he had not seen for four years, and was taken ill and removed to Keighley Hospital on Thursday afternoon last week, dying the same night. Pte. Greenhalgh was 25 years of age, and a native of Blackburn. His brother, Pte. Alex. Greenhalgh, was killed in March last.
Pte. Alfred Banks, Duke of Wellington's, news of whose death came to hand last week-end, was killed in action on the 1st inst. He went out with the 1st 6th Battalion in April, 1915, and had been wounded twice previously. He was 23 years of age and married, his wife residing at 15, Arthur Street, Sough Bridge, Earby. Before enlisting he worked for the East End Manufacturing Co., Sough Bridge. He was the eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. J.W. Banks, 20, Louvain Street, Barnoldswick.


thomo Go to Top of Page
panbiker
Senior Member


2301 Posts
Posted - 19/11/2011 : 20:31

Here are the individuals who have been found so far down at Ghyll. They are on my list if they are included on a headstone even if not actually buried at Ghyll. Some of these entries are obvious as the family memorial records the details others don't. All CWG burials are actual and all found as far as I am aware.

I have sorted the lists in alphabetical order by surname, for easier reference.

The table is the best I can do in the quick reply box.

Ghyll Cemetery - Undenominational

 
         

Marker

Rank/Trade

Initials

Surname

Service/Regiment

None

Gunner

Wilfred

Anker

Royal Field Artillery

CWG

Pte

J.R

Barnes

West Yorks Regiment

Family

Guardsman

Midgley

Barrett

1Bn Irish Guards (Buried at Anzio) 1944 (27)

Family

Air Gunner

John

Butterfield

Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve

Family

 

Hartley

Dene

Royal Navy Volunteer Reserve

Family

Sapper

Stanley

Derbyshire

Royal Engineers

CWG

Pte

A

Green

9th Gordon Highlanders/ Highland Light Infantry

Family

Pte

George

Greenwood

Royal Field Artillery

CWG

Sgt

Frederick. V

Greenwood

Royal Marines

CWG

 

S.A

Hall

Womens Royal Navy SCN

CWG

Driver

J

Halstead

Royal Army Service Corps

CWG

Pte

Harry

Halstead

Durham Light Infantry

Family

Pte

William. E.

Hargreaves

Pioneer Corps

Family

 

Joseph

Hargreaves

06/05/1942

Family

 

Richard. S.

Harris

 

Family

Pte

Lewis

Hartley

Duke of Wellington's Regiment

Family

Pte

Robert

Heaps

East Lancs Regiment

Family

Pte

John Henry

Holden

Duke of Wellingtons Regiment (West Riding)

Family

Pte

Harry

Holdsworth

Royal Fusiliers - KIA 25/9/17

CWG

Volunteer

Joseph. L

Holmes

17th Warwickshire Btn Home Guard

CWG

Gunner

W

Jackson

Royal Field Artillery

Family

Pte

Eddie

Leeper

Highland Light Infantry

Family

 

Albert Edward

McCann

K.I.A. - France 1944

CWG

Flt Lt (Pilot)

Jack Stearn

McWicker

Royal Air Force

CWG

Pte

W

Mitchell

Northumberland Fusiliers

CWG

Pte

Alice

Seymour

Auxiliary Territorial Service

Family

Signaller

Thomas

Skinner

Duke of Wellingtons Regiment (West Riding)

Family

Gunner

Arthur

Sneath

Royal Field Artillery

Family

Trooper

Charlie. V.

Thornton

Dragoon Guards (Interred at Havrincourt France)

Family

Pte

Carl. R

Watson

Labour Btn

CWG

Pte

J.M

Wilkinson

West Yorks Regiment

         

Ghyll Churchyard

   
         

Marker

Rank/Trade

Initials

Surname

Service/Regiment

CWG

 

R.W

Antcliffe

Royal Corps Transport

CWG

 

R

Bamber

Royal Artillery

CWG

Able Seaman

J.R

Barlow

Royal Navy

Family

 

R.H

Berry

 

CWG

Able Seaman

K

Bradley

HMS Woolwich, Royal Navy

Family

Pte

Haworth. R

Green

East Yorkshire Regiment

CWG

Gunner

Harry. E

Holdsworth

Royal Artillery

Family

 

James

Hudson

6/6/17 (buried at Etaples)

Family

Gunner

Lapedge

Monks

Royal Field Artilery

CWG

 

R.A.

Myers

Royal Engineers

CWG

Pte

J

Norcross

Kings Own Yorkshire Light Infantry

CWG

Lance Corporal

B.T

Ormerod

Royal Army Medical Corps

Family

Pte

W

Parker

Durham Light Infantry

Family

 

Norman Birch

Patefield

POW North Africa 17/8/42

Family

Pte

Herbert

Pickering

Royal Scots Regiment

Family

 

Arthur

Robinson

POW 11/3/45

Family

 

J

Rushton

 

Family

 

Herbert

Shires

Duke Of Wellington's Regiment

Family

 

Wilfred

Shires

Duke Of Wellington's Regiment

Family

 

George

Thomas

East Lancs 17/2/15 France

CWG

Gunner

R

Thompson

Royal Garrison Artillery

CWG

SB Attendant

F.S

Walsh

R.N.A.S.B.Rsv

CWG

 

E

Widdup

Royal Army Ordnance Corps

CWG

Lance Sgt

J

Wilson

Duke Of Wellington's Regiment

Family

Pte

James

Wilson

6th East Lancs  KIA 9/8/15 Dardenelles

 

 

Edited by - panbiker on 20/11/2011 10:32


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