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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted -  22/06/2007  :  10:00
WE ARE WHAT WE EAT 2007

 I have shifted the intro to the body of the topic.


Stanley Challenger Graham




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stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk
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Tizer
VIP Member


5150 Posts
Posted - 16/11/2010 : 10:27
I have a friend who is a nutrition professor in the US and gets called to speak on radio and TV. She says that taxing food won't change people's choices and always makes the point about how long and how much we have taxed cigarettes and it makes little difference to numbers smoking. People crave rich, sweet food.


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 16/11/2010 : 16:21
I've heard the same opinion.


Stanley Challenger Graham




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stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
Tizer
VIP Member


5150 Posts
Posted - 17/11/2010 : 16:47
This week I helped the manager of a small cereal company contact scientists to get more information on oats and he now says he'll send me a box of their cereal products, which I'm looking forward to. It's worth having a look at their web site, they farm using traditional methods but with an organic basis and are committed to protecting the environment and wildlife.

http://www.pertwood.co.uk


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 18/11/2010 : 06:55
I've always regarded oats as far more important than their availability suggests. Problem with them has always been that in terms of 'bangs per buck' they are relatively low-yielding and there is more profit in barley and wheat.

http://www.oatmealofalford.com/about.html

This where I got my stoneground oatmeal after seeing the mill on Hairy Bikers. Good tackle! I put them in bread, stews and of course, porridge.


Stanley Challenger Graham




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stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
Tizer
VIP Member


5150 Posts
Posted - 07/01/2011 : 09:37
Headline news this morning of egg being imported into Britain which is contaminated with a carcinogenic chemical, dioxin. Don't stop buying eggs - the news refers to bulk liquid egg which is used as a food ingredient, not to eggs as we consumers buy them  (but it's always best to buy your eggs from local suppliers anyway). The dioxin has been much diluted and will be well below danger level, probably a vanishingly low level of contamination by the time it's in the final food product. And you need to be exposed to dioxin for a long time for low levels to have any health effects.

Having said all that, it's a worrying example of the flaws in our modern food processing chain which is so complicated that it's difficult to police effectively and its large scale means that any single contamination tends to have potential implications for millions, not thousands, of consumers, and perhaps in several countries because of the wide distribution. In this case a German distributor of oils supplied an animal feed manufacturer with a biofuel grade oil instead of a food grade oil. This oil was incorporated into animal feed that was then supplied to many German poultry farms. Eggs from German farms were supplied to a company in the Netherlands to make liquid egg and this was exported to other countries. Making blended products like liquid egg on a large scale has the danger that contamination in one or a few farms' eggs is spread to all the product. In this case the spread has been even greater because that product, liquid egg, was then used in many food products.


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 08/01/2011 : 07:05
In a similar way I have read reports which say that almost all the Maize and associated corn products on the world market contain GM maize. Not that I think it's a big problem but it demonsrates what happens when different crops are bulked up for transport.

On a different but related note, the producers of Basmati rice made a big investment in sponsoring the development of genetic tests for rice. When applied they demonstrated that only three brands were pure Basmati. Lubna is one and that's the rice that Chaudrey's greengrocery shop on Town Square in Barlick sells. (Yes it's an advert for them!)


Stanley Challenger Graham




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stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
Tizer
VIP Member


5150 Posts
Posted - 08/01/2011 : 11:46
Factory bosses in the big food companies often whinge about any money being spent on scientific research. One of my science friends at Carlsberg in Copenhagen used to come up against the problem. Then one day the Carlsberg boss for Germany got taken in by the police and threatened with jail for breaking the German beer purity law (taken very seriously there, only malted barley, hops, yeast, water allowed). They claimed Carlsberg was selling beer there which had maize used in its manufacture. Of course there was much turmoil within the ranks of Carlsberg directors at the thought of one of their kin being thrown in the nick. My friend went to the lab and, with a deadline of a few days, invented an immunoassy for maize in beer, used it on the samples and showed it was absent from Carlsberg beer sold in Germany. The Carlsberg boss was released. Less was said about money spent on science from then on. Fancy that.


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 09/01/2011 : 06:41
I like it!


Stanley Challenger Graham




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stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
Tizer
VIP Member


5150 Posts
Posted - 10/01/2011 : 10:52
Watch out for companies trying to sell you `chromium picolinate' as a food supplement or as an additive to food products. One of the companies has just had its product, Chromax, passed as safe by the European Food Safety Authority. It already claims that Chromax is its top-selling product in the USA. But there is very little evidence of benefit to anyone except a few people in very special circumstances such as on long term intravenous feeding. Diabetics might be targeted by the sellers because one of the claims is that chromium is important for the action of insulin. What they don't tell you is that you've got plenty of chromium already and only tiny amounts are needed!

Taking supplements when you don't need them is harmful to your purse/wallet . Even if the supplement is passed as being safe this is always qualified by `as far as we know' and it's best not to take in chemicals that you don't need, just in case (otherwise you might be the odd one out who is adversely affected - think of the lottery picture of the big finger pointing: "It could be you!"). One of the concerns has been that the product must contain only what is known as `chromium (III)' and not contain any `chromium (VI)' which is a carcinogen.

Edited by - Tizer on 10/01/2011 10:53:10


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 11/01/2011 : 05:51
Reinforces my conviction that Mother Nature's mix of micro-nutrients and minerals is best. Eat natural food that's been nowhere near a prcessing factory.


Stanley Challenger Graham




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stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
Tizer
VIP Member


5150 Posts
Posted - 25/01/2011 : 09:48
Be careful when you handle packaged chicken at the supermarket and in other shops! Birmingham food safety officials have told the Food Standards Agency that their study of 20 packages found food poisoning bacteria on the *outside* of 8, while 7 chickens were contaminated on the inside. There was no link between the chickens infected inside and outside the packaging, which suggests cross contamination. The chicken is safe when cooked because the bacteria will be destroyed but the bacteria on the outside of the packs is a different problem. Besides being a danger to the person who handles the pack the bacteria will be transferred on their hands to other items they touch in the supermarket and to the trolley handles. Watch out especially for leaky packs.   (Newspaper report here)

Edited by - Tizer on 25/01/2011 09:48:58


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 26/01/2011 : 04:33
The origins of cheap chicken are one of the biggest mysteries in supermarkets and fast food outlets. Imported chicken cuts from Far East are very common and once defrosted and re-packed they require very expensive and slow analysis to prove anything one way or another. Only 100% safe way is to buy an unwrapped chicken from a trusted butcher and cook it until it is dropping off the bone. Warnings about bacteria on outside of packing apply to anything in packages especially slad leaves packed overseas. One big problem which everyone keeps quiet about is the lack of medical checks on itinerant migrant workers in the food industry. Not just in UK, my GP mate in Minnesota found AB resistant TB in casual workers at a local turkey packing plant and couldn't get any satisfaction as to what was done about it. The labour was cheap and essential to the buisness model so no action. Just look the other way and hope there was no cross-infection.


Stanley Challenger Graham




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stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 14/02/2011 : 07:44
A report of reseach findings on R4 this morning assures us that we can eat as many eggs as we want! They are good for us and don't increase cholesterol levels. They have caught up with OG at last!


Stanley Challenger Graham




Barlick View
stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
Tizer
VIP Member


5150 Posts
Posted - 15/02/2011 : 10:03
The science has been there all the time, the trouble is that the media and the `advisors' pick up an idea and won't let go even though it's wrong. They are too gullible to the false information put out by the vested interests. Athough we have this information on eggs the same media reports are still telling us to avoid saturated fats which is the wrong advice. They should be advising people to eat less overall, i.e. smaller meals. There is nothing wrong with saturated fats if you don't eat too much of them - and the same applies to all foods.


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 16/02/2011 : 05:20
Tiz, I'm convinced that the reason the saturated fats canard persists is because it suits the food processor's shelf-life policies and profit margins. I heard it again on the radio yesterday, I forget the name of the organisation but it was a well-known popular science source, makes you wonder how good their research is and who's funding them.


Stanley Challenger Graham




Barlick View
stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
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