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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted -  14/11/2010  :  06:41
New version to make loading easier'

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Stanley Challenger Graham




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stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk
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Tizer
VIP Member


5150 Posts
Posted - 23/10/2011 : 11:40
When my South African mum came to Britain in the 1940s and stayed with my dad's mother she was shocked when Grandma said "Am goin' campin' wi' Mrs Duckworth this afternoon".


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marilyn
VIP Member


5007 Posts
Posted - 24/10/2011 : 04:58
Tizer, forgive me, but I cannot work that one out.
You will have to explain it.

Julie...nearly wet myself over the "one eye on the pot and the other up the chimney". So funny...


get your people to phone my people and we will do lunch...MAZ Go to Top of Page
Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 24/10/2011 : 05:00
Camping = having a conversation Maz. I'm sure you've heard it at some time.


Stanley Challenger Graham




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stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
marilyn
VIP Member


5007 Posts
Posted - 24/10/2011 : 05:04
No...don't think so, Stanley.


get your people to phone my people and we will do lunch...MAZ Go to Top of Page
belle
VIP Member


6502 Posts
Posted - 24/10/2011 : 08:35
Nor me, just as stumped as you were Maz!


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Tizer
VIP Member


5150 Posts
Posted - 24/10/2011 : 12:54
Thanks for explaining Stanley. I think we might have mentioned `camping' in this context once before on here and wondered whether it might have come from `chatting over a Camp coffee'.  (LINK)


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Bodger
Regular Member


892 Posts
Posted - 24/10/2011 : 13:36
ok then where does "camp" effeminate" tie in ?


"You can only make as well as you can measure"
                           Joseph Whitworth
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Differently named
New Member


30 Posts
Posted - 25/10/2011 : 05:10
Must be the bell ringing ( oh I am so sorry about that remark) as with Campanology. Just checked the etymology of campanology and I may be closer than I imagined.


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Differently named
New Member


30 Posts
Posted - 25/10/2011 : 05:10
Oooh, I shouldn't have got up this morning.


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 25/10/2011 : 06:14
'Camp'. I had a furtle....  Wiki says: "Camp derives from the French slang term se camper, meaning "to pose in an exaggerated fashion". The OED gives 1909 as the first print citation of camp as
ostentatious, exaggerated, affected, theatrical; effeminate or homosexual; pertaining to, characteristic of, homosexuals. So as a noun, ‘camp’ behaviour, mannerisms, et cetera. (cf. quot. 1909); a man exhibiting such behaviour.
Per the Oxford English Dictionary, this sense is "etymologically obscure"."

Webster and Collins agree on the definition but are cagey about the origin beyond it being 20th century.


Stanley Challenger Graham




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Bodger
Regular Member


892 Posts
Posted - 25/10/2011 : 09:19
From back to front (sorry) in my youth you picked a "bogey" from the nostril, does this have a golfing connection, or as lads we made bogies from old prams etc.?


"You can only make as well as you can measure"
                           Joseph Whitworth
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Differently named
New Member


30 Posts
Posted - 25/10/2011 : 16:28
Oh thank you Stanley, I got into a right muddle this morning on the camp thing.


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 26/10/2011 : 05:53
Webster is curiously reticent on the snot bogey! Collins mentions it as dried nucus and relates it to bogey in the sense of spirit or 'something that annoys'. The origin of 'bogey' as a spirit (as in bogyman) is thought to derive from Bug. This squares with the modern usage of something 'bugging' or annoying you. See 'bogle' and 'boggart'. all seem to be from the same root.


Stanley Challenger Graham




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stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
Bodger
Regular Member


892 Posts
Posted - 26/10/2011 : 09:00
on the Rochdale / Ashton u Lyne side of Manchester there is / was an area called Boggart Clough


"You can only make as well as you can measure"
                           Joseph Whitworth
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Callunna
Revolving Grey Blob


3044 Posts
Posted - 26/10/2011 : 13:40
Wouldn't that be Boggart Hole Clough, near Blackley?

I used to live near there. Go to Top of Page
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