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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted -  14/10/2004  :  09:57
Jack is making a lot of friends in Barlick. I don't know why, maybe it's his face markings but people on the street feel the need to stroke him. Women in particular fall for him.

As you know, I had a bad experience with Joe, the lurcher from Irlam. I was very wary about taking another feral dog on but I'm beginning to think that Jack will make it as a member of the team. He's good at coming to hand when off the lead but I'm not saying he'd take any notice if he was distracted.

He's fast and very agile and seems to have lungs as big as a bucket, I haven't heard him pant as though he's out of breath even after a hard run. As for jumping, he's like a cat. Here he is on his favourite perch. Someone asked me the other day why I don't stop him doing it. It's easier to clean the drainer twice a day!


[This topic started as Jack's blog but in Jan 2008 I had to put him down because he started attacking strange dogs.  His successor is Black Jack. a Patterdale pup, no point erasing Jack the Lurcher from history....  he was a good dog and what happened wasn't his fault.  He had too bad a start.....]


Stanley Challenger Graham




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stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk
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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 17/02/2010 : 08:17
I gave him plenty of TLC Cath. Anni, you're right of vourse.

We've been in the wars again! As I went onto the old sidings this morning there was a young woman with a brindled bull terrier on one of those fishing line leads. I kept Jack on his lead and stood in the entrance on Wellhouse Road inending to wait until she had gone because I didn't like the way it was acting. As soon as it saw Jack it ran out to the end of the lead and somehow came completely out of its harness. There was no mucking about, it came straight for Jack and tried to grab his throat. I caught it a couple off good kicks in its ribs which slowed it up a bit. Meanwhile the lass is screaming at the dog anbd running after it. Give her her due she grabbed it and dragged it off Jack but I told her in no uncertain terms that she had a dangerous dog, it should be muzzled on a short lead and what would happen if it grabbed a child? No answer or debate so I just walked away and kept jack on his lead until I saw her go. 

Now before you say anything, of course she and the dog should be reported but how do you find out where she lives? If you did find out, would anything be done? 

Jack went on to play with three of his mates in Valley Gardens and he wasn't bitten. By the way, I found another woumd on the back of his neck last night from the attack last week. Not a bad one and it's healing OK. The deep wound is OK. It's healing over nicely and I've stopped picking his scab for him and putting the antibiotic ointment on.

Do these attacks come in threes????


Stanley Challenger Graham




Barlick View
stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
moh
Silver Surfer


6860 Posts
Posted - 17/02/2010 : 13:23
I hope not.


Say only a little but say it well Go to Top of Page
Cathy
Senior Member


4249 Posts
Posted - 18/02/2010 : 08:28
Stanley take a photo next time - show the council, maybe the council have other complaints against the owner and dog, and know who they are.  Might work.


All thru the fields and meadows gay  ....  Enjoy   
Take Care...Cathy Go to Top of Page
marilyn
VIP Member


5007 Posts
Posted - 18/02/2010 : 10:33
Perhaps - unknown to you Stanley - Jack gives off an odour that challenges or upsets other male dogs. Perhaps his odour labels him as a threat.
Well...who knows? It is not outside the realm of possibility.


get your people to phone my people and we will do lunch...MAZ Go to Top of Page
Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 18/02/2010 : 16:56
If he had he'd be gatting attacked all the time. The vast majority of dogs get on well with him, it's the trophy attack dogs that are the big problem and it's growing.


Stanley Challenger Graham




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stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 20/04/2010 : 09:00
Jack is doing fine but the sad news is that his mate, Tessa the 15 year old Lurcher had to be put down because she had a tumour behind her eye. Sue is frief-stricken and not surprising. I saw another of his mates this marning, an old brindled dog. He has exactly the same problem and his owner asked me where she should take him. I recommended Mrs Marsh, one of our local vets because she is such a kind woman. It's the big penalty you have to pay for sharing your life with a good dog. I sympathise with both of them....


Stanley Challenger Graham




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stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
Julie in Norfolk
Senior Member


1632 Posts
Posted - 20/04/2010 : 15:28
The "trophy" dogs are a d*mn nuisance. I am pleased Jack is ok and getting over this and that he went out to play with his mates ok. Sam has to let new dogs on the block know who he is and that he is not to be ignored, however his attentions are about confidence and not fear or bad behaviour. I tend to think that dogs that attack are fearful of their perceived status or have I been watching the Dog Worrier* too often. (*whisperer)


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 20/04/2010 : 15:56
More likely to be owners that are inadequate compensating by training their dogs to attack Jules. You're right, it needs stopping. Did you see that a mastiff killed a child the other day and the owner has been charged with causing her death?


Stanley Challenger Graham




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stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 16/06/2010 : 07:49
Wonderful news this morning! A lady I know had an old Lurcher called Tessa who was a great mate of Jack's but had to be put down. This week the same lady has to put her horse down as well. However....  she has got two pups and whilst she is sad about her old horse she is over the moon about the pups, as she said she's got two babies now. So nice to see her happy and her work mates say she is a different woman. We pay a price when we lose our mates but it's nice to see her moving on. Wonderful!


Stanley Challenger Graham




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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 29/07/2010 : 08:06

A DOG'S LIFE

It struck me yesterday that an update on Jack might be in order, and yes, before you say it, I am soppy about babies and young animals, especially dogs. I think it's because they have none of our adult traits, they tend to give love unconditionally.

Black Jack is the successor to big white Jack who many of you will remember. He was disadvantaged from birth and ran feral for eighteen months before he landed up with me and we had four good years before his early traumas caught up with him and the vet and I agreed that he was becoming dangerous. Anyone who has taken a healthy young dog to be put down will know what a trauma it is and in previous cases I have needed a bit of time to grieve and come round to the idea of another companion. In the case of Big Jack my friend Dave O'Connor didn't give me that luxury. By chance his wife Carol knew of a young dog that needed a new home and Dave dragged me to Nelson where I became the new companion animal to a twelve week old Patterdale that soon claimed my affection. He's 3 years old this month and I think we can safely say he has settled in nicely.

What triggered this update was some unusual behaviour over the last few days. He suddenly became very interested in the sideboard in the front room. That's right, the side board. This is an immovable piece of furniture because it has Johnny Pickles' 1927 ornamental turning lathe sat on top of it. It stands on a base which is solid all the way round except at the back which is about six inches away from the wall.

We need to step back here and get a bit of background. I lay no claim to being expert on keeping dogs but over the years I have picked up one or two helpful insights. Most dogs I have seen which exhibit unhappiness by being noisy, nasty or lethargic are suffering from boredom. Different breeds need different levels of stimulation, terriers need a lot! You have to play with them and find out what triggers them off into activity on their own. In Black Jack's case it is his ball. He has two solid rubber ones, the large one is for chasing in the park and a smaller one is for worrying indoors. At one point he had a hollow tough rubber one which fascinated him, I think mainly because of the noises it made as he chewed it and tried to destroy it.

Every evening as I settled down in the front room for my daily ration of TV he would bring his ball in and my role was to keep knocking it with my foot so he can chase it and bring it back. He has trained me to be quite good at this, I can keep him occupied and watch TV at the same time. One night, about a year ago there was a bit of a disaster. In his eagerness to catch the ball he knocked it in the air, it fell behind the sideboard and rolled under the base where it was inaccessible. No problem, I got the reserve ball and this kept him quite happy. Until this week...

It did cross my mind that his fascination with the sideboard might be because he had got wind of his old ball but this seemed so far-fetched after a year that I dismissed it. Until last night. I was sat there watching TV and realised that I could hear Jack but hadn't the faintest idea where he was. All was revealed when he appeared from behind the sideboard with the old yellow ball in his mouth! As I write this he is at my feet happily gnawing away on the hollow ball and no doubt cleaning his teeth at the same time.

So, we have a happy and busy dog, just as it should be but what fascinates me is what triggered this interest in the fate of his ball after twelve months without it. What was going on his brain? Did something move the ball and disturb it? Perhaps a mouse? My opinion is that for some reason, perhaps to do with the fairly high humidity we have had for a week or two, the scent got to him and triggered a memory. Once he was on the scent he couldn't let it be until he had got to it. Since he retrieved it he has had no interest in the sideboard.

So don't try to tell me that dogs have a limited retention of memory or attention span. They will always surprise you if you observe them well enough. Jack lives up to his promise, he is intelligent and active and by the way, is convinced that he is the master! Just as it should be and if the longevity of other terriers I have lived with is any guide I could possibly have 15 more years of this to put up with! So, if you should happen to see a 90 year old bloke walking round the town with a small black dog in 15 years time, recognise that you're looking at an old married couple taking the air! Here's hoping...


SCG/29/07/10





Stanley Challenger Graham




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stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page

Another
Traycle Mine Overseer


6250 Posts
Posted - 29/07/2010 : 08:38
 

Comrade, I'm convinced that Misty has a long memory retention. We'd had her as couple of years and one Xmas took the car to Foulridge wharf, parked up and started walking on the towpath towards Salterforth. Once we got to where she could see the low lying fields on the right she kept stopping and letting out a whine. This carried on until the fields were hidden from view and then she walked on happily. At the boathouse we turned rounds and started walking back and sure enough once she saw the fields near Foulridge she started again. I said to Cath that there looked to be a lot of rabbits down there and I wondered if her previous owner had run her in those fields.  Every time we took her on that walk she exhibited the same sort of behaviour.

About 3 months ago we had a visit from Alex, Misty's previous owner. It took her a minute or two to work out who he was and she then made a great fuss of him. We told him about the Foulridge behaviour and he couldn't believe it. Not only did he used to take her in those fields it was whilst turning at pace for a rabbit that she went over and badly damaged her shoulder. 

On Tuesday Cath and Charlotte had her on that walk and her behaviour remains the same. Nolic 

 

 


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Tizer
VIP Member


5150 Posts
Posted - 29/07/2010 : 10:24
I think in Jack's case it was more like "The old codger's watching too much tele when he should be writing, I wonder what I can do to help. I know, I'll dig out that old yellow ball that he liked so much and that I've been saving behind the sideboard. That'll get him back on track. I wonder if he'll remember it, they do say humans have long memories."


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 29/07/2010 : 16:46
Knowing his penchant for bossing me about you could well be right.


Stanley Challenger Graham




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stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
Anni
Regular Member


634 Posts
Posted - 29/07/2010 : 20:21
Thanks for the update Stanley.  It is 48 long weeks since I said goodbye to my girl and friends are telling me I should consider getting another.

I have - oh I have.  But my life is not stable enough (I often have to be away from home during the week) and the man who cared for the pampered pooch when I had to leave, is 82 and has deteriorated rapidly since we lost her.  He couldn't cope with another and anyway, she was special.  She understood his frailty and took herself for a walk around the woods while he waited at the car Laughing


I don't believe they do forget, although "dog experts" tell me I am wrong and I just put my "wants" on their behaviour.   The pooch had a bad start (6 years) and when after a month she say her previous owner, she looked her up and down and then just turned her head away.  Laughing  Made me laugh though as I didn't like the woman for the way she had treated the pooch.

Edited by - Anni on 29/07/2010 8:24:46 PM


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 30/07/2010 : 05:59
Like most things in life I believe that you get back exactly what you put in. Dogs are good examples of this. They are often a reflection of their companion animal!


Stanley Challenger Graham




Barlick View
stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
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