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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted -  17/11/2004  :  14:52
Opening text too long so I've moved it to the first response.


Stanley Challenger Graham




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stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk
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belle
VIP Member


6502 Posts
Posted - 10/11/2010 : 12:23
Haven't heard of that one Cathy, but it is nice to hear the word kerb, as opposed to the american 'sidewalk' i get really fed up with americanisms as they often are tediuosly long my least favourite being "horsebackriding"..what other part of a horse would you ride?


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Bodger
Regular Member


892 Posts
Posted - 10/11/2010 : 15:24
Kerb  here in the town of Oldcastle, is tow/ toe path, not sure which spelling applies, but there is no canal in the area, another word used, knat, pronounced, kernatt, again not sure of spelling, but it describes a person who is a bit of a chancer, fly guy, con artist, etc.


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Bradders
Senior Member


1880 Posts
Posted - 11/11/2010 : 00:38
I always thought that Kerb was to do with the very edge of the pavement ...as in Kerb stone....


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Bradders
Senior Member


1880 Posts
Posted - 11/11/2010 : 00:45
Just a quick one ..eh !

Moosh / Mush ? ....Sid James sort of talk ...You don't hear it much these days . (What 're you looking at Mush ?) and then again, oh no ... there was "Squire"... ! 


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 11/11/2010 : 06:16
Brad, I've always understood 'kerb' as the stone edge of a footway as well. 'Mush' sounds like a Yiddish root to me.

'Squire' is an interesting one. Leaving aside rhyming slang, of which I know very little, the status the term implies for the recipient depends on the status of the speaker. Used by a knight to his squire it would imply he was a menial. Used by a tenant to his landlord it would be respectful. Used between equals it could be either sarcasm or a compliment. I can't sort that one out. I think it's Cockney usage or do others use it?


Stanley Challenger Graham




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tripps
Senior Member


1404 Posts
Posted - 11/11/2010 : 08:56
I'm fairly sure that 'mush' is Romany Gypsy.  During my name research I've come across four people with Squire as a first name.  Mid 19th century.


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Cathy
Senior Member


4249 Posts
Posted - 11/11/2010 : 09:01

Silly me, curb should have been kerb.  My excuse is that I was watching Qi at the same time... Wink


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belle
VIP Member


6502 Posts
Posted - 11/11/2010 : 09:06
Yes we have a "squire" in the outer branches of our tree too.
Tripps the oxford english dictionary agrees with you about the romany origins, and remindsme that mush is also slang for face.


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moh
Silver Surfer


6860 Posts
Posted - 11/11/2010 : 10:51
The is/was a guy in Earby called Squire Firth.


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Bradders
Senior Member


1880 Posts
Posted - 11/11/2010 : 11:03
Yes Belle , I'd forgotten Mush for face  and Mug too ,as in Ugly Mug  and Mugshot !


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wendyf
Senior Member


1439 Posts
Posted - 11/11/2010 : 13:05
Moh, Squire Firth is alive and well and still in Earby.


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 11/11/2010 : 15:47
I seem to remember coming across a bloke with 'King' for a forename.


Stanley Challenger Graham




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stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
moh
Silver Surfer


6860 Posts
Posted - 12/11/2010 : 13:55
Good.


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Tizer
VIP Member


5150 Posts
Posted - 12/11/2010 : 16:35
I have an ancestor Peter Willicy in Balderstone in the late 1700s. The death of his son Leonard from smallpox is recorded as follows:
Burial: 8 Nov 1796 St Leonard, Balderstone, Lancashire, England
Leanord Willicy - son of Doctor Willicy & Betty, Died: 6 Nov 1796, Age: 9 months; Abode: Balderston; Cause of Death: smallpox; Source: PR2879/1

I don't know whether Peter Willicy was the local doctor or if he had two forenames and was Doctor Peter Willicy or Peter Doctor Willicy. `Doctor' was used as a forename as well as a title in those days. I never got to Balderstone churchyard to look for a gravestone. If anyone is checking MIs there I would be interested to know if there is a gravestone and what it says. I'm not sure of Peter's birth year but think it may be 1764. I don't know when he died, I haven't been able to find a record.


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wendyf
Senior Member


1439 Posts
Posted - 12/11/2010 : 17:13
Is this your Peter, Tiz?

Baptisms: 18 Mar 1764 St Anne, Woodplumton, Lancashire, England
Peeter Willicy - Son of Lenard Willicy
    Abode: Catford
    Register: Baptisms 1745 - 1784, Page 42, Entry 3
    Source: LDS Film 1470949

If it is, there seems to be a line of Peters & Leonards going back in time. I got this from the Lancashire Online Parish Clerks Project.


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