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Callunna
Revolving Grey Blob


3044 Posts
Posted -  02/11/2011  :  12:53
Came up in conversation today about whether it should be spelled Barlick or Barlic. 

Someone mentioned the food shop Barlic Bites and said wasn't it strange how they got away with spelling it wrong.

However, I have a press cutting from the Craven Herald of 1914 which spells the town's nickname without a K and many locals also spell it that way. 

It's always been with a K for me, but if this turned out to be the modern spelling then I'd be happy to accept a non-K version.

Does anyone have any strong evidence for either way? 
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wendyf
Senior Member


1439 Posts
Posted - 05/11/2011 : 21:33
From "The Bradford Observer" Tuesday January 13th 1874. Under the heading, "The Extraordinary Affair at Barnoldswick".
"Situated as it is on the very verge of the West Riding, Barnoldswick is but little known to the outside public, although the inhabitants of "Barlick" as they love to call their hamlet, are not by any means inclined to think themselves of small importance in the world. The village which contains some 2500 inhabitants, is an old one, although at present time it has developed, or perhaps degenerated, into a small manufacturing town. The inhabitants, removed as they are from the great highways of modern civilization, are people of very strong and clannish preposessions, and but very slight incentive is required to arouse these propensities into aggressive action...."
whatchutalkingabout


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Callunna
Revolving Grey Blob


3044 Posts
Posted - 05/11/2011 : 23:03


quote:
wendyf wrote:
From "The Bradford Observer" Tuesday January 13th 1874. Under the heading, "The Extraordinary Affair at Barnoldswick".
"Situated as it is on the very verge of the West Riding, Barnoldswick is but little known to the outside public, although the inhabitants of "Barlick" as they love to call their hamlet, are not by any means inclined to think themselves of small importance in the world. The village which contains some 2500 inhabitants, is an old one, although at present time it has developed, or perhaps degenerated, into a small manufacturing town. The inhabitants, removed as they are from the great highways of modern civilization, are people of very strong and clannish preposessions, and but very slight incentive is required to arouse these propensities into aggressive action...."
whatchutalkingabout

My word! 

Nowt's changed in nearly 140 years!

Thanks for the reference Wendy. Now you've got me gasping to know what the Extraordinary Affair was Surprised

Where on earth do you all dredge up your info from? Bradford Observer 1874, Early Tudor Craven Subsidies, CHSC minute books ... amazing!
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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 06/11/2011 : 05:54
CHSC minutes handwritten.

1874 'Affair' could have been the schism inside the Baptist church which resulted in legal action between two factions related to support of and opposition to the pastor Bennett. This resulted in the building of the North Street Baptist church in 1877 in opposition to Bethesda on Manchester Road. This affair went on for years and the pastor of the chuch in the 1950s told me that an elder had told him that Bennett's eventual death was as a result of an earlier assault on the street which many suspected was down to unruly elements in the North Street faction. All a  long time ago but red hot news at the time. 1874 would have been about right for the court case which decided Bennett could have the main chuch on Manchester Road.

The funny thing about all this is that everyone clammed up about the original cause of the dispute. The accepted version is that it was a result of Bennett's failed attempt to set up a weaving operation at Clough to give employment to his flock in the hard years of the Cotton Famine. We know he did this and went bankrupt but I have always suspected there was more to it and whatever it was it was so shameful that it was buried. I don't suppose we will ever know.


Stanley Challenger Graham




Barlick View
stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
wendyf
Senior Member


1439 Posts
Posted - 06/11/2011 : 08:49
This extraordinary affair was to do with the vicar of Ghyll church, the Rev. Samuel H Ireson, who wasn't popular with his parishioners having raised the fees for the publishing of Banns from 1s to 2s and the fees for marriages from 2s-6d to 7s-6d. The new burial ground had been opened in 1871 but most people were still being interred in the old ground, which was pretty full. Ireson had imposed a fee of 15s for the old ground to try and deter families from wanting a grave dug there. On this occasion a woman called Grace Curwen had died, and Ireson claimed he asked the Sexton to dig a grave in the new ground. On the morning of the funeral he discovered that a grave had been opened beside the woman's family in the old ground. He refused to bury her until he was paid 15s, or a new grave was dug. Her body remained in the church through the Sunday service next day, and when the vicar left to return home an angry crowd of "one of two thousand people" had gathered. They followed Ireson back to his home near the station in Barlick, shouting abuse and slinging mud at him. He drew a 6 chambered revolver from his pocket to hold back the crowd.....
The situation was unresolved at the time of the article, Grace was unburied and Ireson was determined.
I dont know what happened next.....


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panbiker
Senior Member


2300 Posts
Posted - 06/11/2011 : 10:03
Those were the days, vicars brandishing revolvers to fend off angry parishoners. It's the stuff ripping yarns are made of, fantastic Wendy.

Cally, I have an idea that Wendy may well have got this through the online services available through Lanacashir Library. No doubt she will confirm or not. It's a very good resource but be advised that once you enter, it is very difficult to leave, lots of very interesting stuff in there.


Ian Go to Top of Page
Sue
Senior Member


4201 Posts
Posted - 06/11/2011 : 10:38
see what I mean. Any 'C' sound at the end until spellings became more standardised.


If you keep searching you'll find it Go to Top of Page
wendyf
Senior Member


1439 Posts
Posted - 06/11/2011 : 11:39
You are right Ian, and I have been back on the website this morning, (just for a few minutes--honest) to discover the outcome. The following day's paper held another report. The matter was resolved very quickly. The churchwardens communicated with the Bishop of Ripon without Ireson's permission. The Bishop ordered that Grace should be buried immediately and sent his rural dean, The Rev. Canon Morris from Thornton in Craven to do the deed. The service took place at 9 am Wednesday morning and Grace buried in the old burial ground. The gathered crowds went home happy.


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panbiker
Senior Member


2300 Posts
Posted - 06/11/2011 : 11:49
A good old bit of common sense applied to calm the troubled waters.

I wonder what happened to the vicar. Hauled in for a dressing down by the diocese perhaps?

I will avail Cally of the delights of the LCL online repository when I see her this afternoon.

Edited by - panbiker on 06/11/2011 11:50:50


Ian Go to Top of Page
Callunna
Revolving Grey Blob


3044 Posts
Posted - 06/11/2011 : 12:45
Absolutely priceless stuff! Yay

And both stories involving the church - you couldn't make it up.

Can't wait to get details - OMG it's 12:45 - I should be on my way to Gill - must dash... Go to Top of Page
wendyf
Senior Member


1439 Posts
Posted - 06/11/2011 : 13:15
Here is the link to Lancashire Libraries Online Reference LIbrary. Choose 19th Century British Library Newspapers from the tabs down the left hand side of the page. All you need is a Lancs library card.


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Callunna
Revolving Grey Blob


3044 Posts
Posted - 06/11/2011 : 17:10
Well that's it then. My life is over. 

I've already spent an hour on there, reading the most fascinating stories from the 19th century.

The Barnoldswick Burial case is the stuff of soap operas - if I've time I'll transcribe the 3 scans of the newspaper pages (unless it's already available - if so I can't find it).Go to Top of Page
panbiker
Senior Member


2300 Posts
Posted - 06/11/2011 : 23:01
Told you so!


Ian Go to Top of Page
Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 07/11/2011 : 04:46
I daren't go into the archive, me engines would never get finished!


Stanley Challenger Graham




Barlick View
stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
Bradders
Senior Member


1880 Posts
Posted - 07/11/2011 : 16:49
Mike Harding mentioned Barnoldswick being pronounced  "Barlick" on his Facebook page about an hour ago.....

So it's official , then ....eh !

(it was to do with Bolsover being known locally as "Bowser")
( ....and my four penneth...Tideswell is known as "Tidser")


BRADDERS BLUESINGER Go to Top of Page
elise
Regular Member


70 Posts
Posted - 07/11/2011 : 18:48
Barnoldswick is pronounced Barn'olds'wick.

BarlicK is a contraction of Barnoldswick.


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