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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted -  14/11/2010  :  06:41
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Stanley Challenger Graham




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stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk
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belle
VIP Member


6502 Posts
Posted - 14/04/2011 : 12:05
slightly to the left of fed up...."put out" as in " I am right put out!"


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catgate
Senior Member


1764 Posts
Posted - 14/04/2011 : 16:14


quote:
belle wrote:
slightly to the left of fed up...."put out" as in " I am right put out!"

You must be ambidextrous...Wink


Every silver lining has a cloud.


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belle
VIP Member


6502 Posts
Posted - 14/04/2011 : 16:34
Indeed so!


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Bradders
Senior Member


1880 Posts
Posted - 14/04/2011 : 17:37
Then there's "Put on (Put upon , lumbered with)"....and "Put off  (disswaded in some ways)"........little words, saying a lot !


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belle
VIP Member


6502 Posts
Posted - 14/04/2011 : 18:07
"Put up or shut up!" now does this mean bear (put up with) or close (shut up shop)or Build (put up) or stay silent (shut up)!


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Bradders
Senior Member


1880 Posts
Posted - 15/04/2011 : 01:32
I  "Give Up ".....or maybe I could say  "Give over".....eh!

Edited by - Bradders on 15/04/2011 01:41:28 AM


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 15/04/2011 : 06:09
I was walking up to Letcliffe yesterday reflecting on the differentiation between drizzle, mizzle and Scotch Mist. Add 'fret' or 'Harr' for the east coast?


Stanley Challenger Graham




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stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
Tizer
VIP Member


5150 Posts
Posted - 15/04/2011 : 09:26
"Give over" always makes me think of Compo tormenting his ladyfriend on "Last of the Summer wine".

"..differentiation between drizzle, mizzle and Scotch Mist".....the first two are water, Scotch Mist has alcohol in it!


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Cathy
Senior Member


4249 Posts
Posted - 15/04/2011 : 10:29
To me 'give over' has echoes of 'For goodness sake, get real, cause I don't believe you' and 'Stop annoying me!' 


All thru the fields and meadows gay  ....  Enjoy   
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belle
VIP Member


6502 Posts
Posted - 15/04/2011 : 14:37
Stanley I think the pronounciation of the word for sea mist on the east coast of Scotland would lead me to believe it's spelt "Ha"


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Bruff
Regular Member


479 Posts
Posted - 15/04/2011 : 15:13
Somebody mentioned the Land of Nod on another thread.  Someone asleep in our family used to be in the Land of Nod.  And of course going to bed meant going to the Land of Nod.  Taking a trip to Blanket Fair (to 'bed') was also used (useful still for children...).

 
Last weekend with the in-laws in Cheltenham, I mentioned the wife 'playing pop' with me after I turned up with a set of golf clubs I bought off a bloke in a pub (long story....).  They'd never heard that one before.

 
Do folk have phrases or expressions their families now use for a situation based on an experience in the past?  This might not be clear, let me explain. 

 
When something really surprising happens, me and my wife might mutter, or shout, 'Englanders!'  This is because, five years or so ago we went to a friend's wedding in Slovakia.  We hired a car in Vienna and drove to Eastern Slovakia.  Car had Austrian number plates.  True to form, we ended up driving the wrong way, down the old town square in a nice place out in the East.  Police pulled us over.  We couldn't understand a thing.  Up steps a local and here's his big chance to show off his German language skills.  We looked just as bemused.  He was crest-fallen, his German obviously not as good as he thought.  Then he clocked our passports the police were holding.  'Englanders!'  'Englanders!', he shouted, surprised and no doubt relieved as anything.  He wandered off laughing, muttering 'Englanders'... 

 
So now, we'll often go 'Englanders!' when surprised.

 
Richard Broughton 



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Tizer
VIP Member


5150 Posts
Posted - 15/04/2011 : 16:05
Like you Richard, we tend to adopt phrases. Where we previously lived there was a long, narrow ginnel running from the end of our street to the shops. One day we entered the ginnel from our end and a family entered at the other. Their young child took one look down the ginnel and cried out "Oh no! People!" So we now use the phrase when there are too many folk about or someone suddenly appears in our view.

Another phrase is from when a young nephew was given a meal with bits of red pepper in it for the first time. He looked down at his plate with a worried face and said: "Urgh, what's those red bits?" So any food we encounter with red bits in it now triggers this phrase, often from us both simultaneously.


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Bradders
Senior Member


1880 Posts
Posted - 15/04/2011 : 18:59
I really don't quite know where it came from  , but I have a feeling it was John Cleese......

In our house if some music came on the radio , and we didn't know the performer , we adopted the "right index fingure under the nose  and the left hand raised , palm forward " pose , which meant  "who's this then ?"


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 16/04/2011 : 05:33
Belle, that's the problem with dialect, we are left to make up our own spellings. There's an Anglo Saxon word 'har' meaning grey or boundary. Pssibly the origin?


Stanley Challenger Graham




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stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
gearce
Regular Member


941 Posts
Posted - 18/04/2011 : 04:53
My tuppence worth ...... Always spelt it 'haar'

The Online Scots Dictionary

Translate from English to Scots!
Scots is the Germanic language,related to English, spoken in Lowland Scotland and Ulster, not the Celtic language Gaelic!

Words with the same and similar meaning are returned!
Found the following 'translations' for sea fog:
"haar"
haar [ha(:)r]
n. A cold, easterly wind. A cold mist or fog, usually used on the east coast for a sea-mist.
This application functions more like a thesaurus than a dictionary.
The suggestions returned are not always exact translations but often words with a similar meaning or theme. Homonyms are also returned.
 
If you are using this dictionary to compose Scots texts ensure that you are aware of the correct semantic and grammatical use of words you are unfamiliar with. If you ignore this, what you are writing will not be Scots, but gibberish.



LANG MEY YER LUM REEK

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