Visit the historic Lancashire Textile Project with over 500 photos and 190 taped interviews|2|0
Go to Page
  First Page  Previous Page    8  9  10  [11]  12  13   Next Page  Last Page
Author Previous Topic Topic Next Topic  
Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted -  14/11/2010  :  06:41
New version to make loading easier'

Old topic is HERE


Stanley Challenger Graham




Barlick View
stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk
Replies
Author
Go to Page
  First Page  Previous Page    8  9  10  [11]  12  13   Next Page  Last Page
 
belle
VIP Member


6502 Posts
Posted - 31/01/2011 : 09:49
Wendy, yes, fiddling about with something, messing about and not concentrating on the task in hand, my understanding of 'footer' too.


Life is what you make itGo to Top of Page
Tizer
VIP Member


5150 Posts
Posted - 31/01/2011 : 09:59
Footer perhaps related to footle, `to loiter aimlessly'.

While looking up those words I saw `fogdog' - strange, I'll leave you to find out for yourselves!


Go to Top of Page
belle
VIP Member


6502 Posts
Posted - 31/01/2011 : 12:42
plitter has a similar meaning to footer ...I love lowland scots.


Life is what you make itGo to Top of Page
belle
VIP Member


6502 Posts
Posted - 04/02/2011 : 10:36
Now this morning I have been a busy bee and thought to myself ..I shall have earned my elevenses...and I wondered how many of you still have elevenses..I think the term has it origins in the army and tiffin and all that, but the other thing i began to wonder is why eleven..it's not long till lunch/dinner..why not tensies?


Life is what you make itGo to Top of Page
Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 05/02/2011 : 06:01
Belle. You're right and I've often wondered. Nether Webster or Brewer have anything to say of note. I wonder whether it's because it rolls off the tongue so nicely? Here's a nice little excerpt from the CHSC minute books. Not strictly dialect but getting close!
"Res. That the flock Dresser at Viaduct Shed (Colne) be allowed to build a shop on the spare land but no power to be supplied. [This trade is dead now. A flock dresser was a man who took your old lumpy flock mattress, opened it up, and put the flock through a 'willow' which pulled the tangled lumps apart, allowed any bed bugs or dirt to drop out and re-stuffed your mattress for you with lovely soft flock.]" 

 


Stanley Challenger Graham




Barlick View
stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page

Tizer
VIP Member


5150 Posts
Posted - 05/02/2011 : 11:46
"..why eleven..it's not long till lunch/dinner..why not tensies?"

No, that would have us at sixes and sevenses!


Go to Top of Page
belle
VIP Member


6502 Posts
Posted - 05/02/2011 : 18:45
This is what wikepedia has to say.mmm not sure about the fourses...it goes on to say the american custom was for whisky at 11..
In the United Kingdom, Ireland and some Commonwealth realms, elevenses is a snack that is similar to afternoon tea, but eaten in the morning.[1] It is generally less savoury than brunch, and might consist of some cake or biscuits with a cup of tea. The name refers to the time of day that it is taken: around 11 am. The term is first attested, in East Anglia, as elevens (1849), elevenses appearing first in the record in 1889. Along with fourses, it seems originally to have been a lower-class usage, but by the middle of the twentieth century was associated with middle class language and culture.[2]


Life is what you make itGo to Top of Page
Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 08/02/2011 : 05:23
Packed lunches. 'Bait' round here mostly but I have used 'bagging', might be from my time in Warwickshire. 'Snap' in mines I think. Any more?


Stanley Challenger Graham




Barlick View
stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
panbiker
Senior Member


2300 Posts
Posted - 08/02/2011 : 09:25
Pack Up and Jock come to mind.


Ian Go to Top of Page
belle
VIP Member


6502 Posts
Posted - 08/02/2011 : 10:40
"Piece", in Scotland...more to do with the bread..as kids got "a piece n'jam." offered when hungry, or a wife might ask "what do want on your piece?"


Life is what you make itGo to Top of Page
Bodger
Regular Member


892 Posts
Posted - 08/02/2011 : 13:36
Scotland, "Ghost Robin" , or vice versa, i'm told it 's an expression in the construction industry for being unable to work ?


"You can only make as well as you can measure"
                           Joseph Whitworth
  Go to Top of Page
panbiker
Senior Member


2300 Posts
Posted - 08/02/2011 : 13:52
Snap


Ian Go to Top of Page
Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 14/02/2011 : 06:45
We had a discussion round the phrase 'taking the biscuit' a while ago, including the possible origins of the nickname 'Biscuit'. I'm reading Mowatt on 'Britain between the wars' at the moment and came across something that might be an explanation. It certainly fits the timing of the examples I found in the LTP transcripts. (See Ernie Entwistle and Jack Platt.)

 In September 1924 a newspaper reported that Ramsay Macdonald, leader of the first Labour government had received 30,000 £1 shares in McVitie and Price, the biscuit company, from Sir Alexander Grant who was given a baronetcy shortly afterwards. Macdonald was pursued in the house and on the street by cries of 'biscuit' and at the time, the affair was referred to as 'taking the biscuit'.It was one of the factors which brought the Labour government down in October 1924.

Could it be the origin?


Stanley Challenger Graham




Barlick View
stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
panbiker
Senior Member


2300 Posts
Posted - 14/02/2011 : 09:02
Sounds very feasable Stanley. £30,000 in shares would be a very good windfall in 1924 even if you were already the top guy.


Ian Go to Top of Page
Bradders
Senior Member


1880 Posts
Posted - 14/02/2011 : 10:14
That's a good one , it would be a gift  to the opposition if it had come from anywhere else ........

My Dad used an expression some times ...."(left) standing there like cheese at fourpence"... I wonder what the significance of the price was (expensive ?).

He was almost always annoyed when he said it , but occasionally he'd be laughing too .

Has it been "done"   here before ?

Edited by - Bradders on 14/02/2011 10:15:46 AM


BRADDERS BLUESINGER Go to Top of Page
Topic is 40 Pages Long:
Go to Page
  First Page  Previous Page    8  9  10  [11]  12  13   Next Page  Last Page
 


Set us as your default homepage Bookmark us Privacy   Copyright 2004-2011 www.oneguyfrombarlick.co.uk All Rights Reserved. Design by: Frost SkyPortal.net Go To Top Of Page

Page load time - 1.813