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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted -  14/11/2010  :  06:41
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Stanley Challenger Graham




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stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk
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wendyf
Senior Member


1439 Posts
Posted - 05/12/2010 : 08:39
Bodge, my hubby, who comes from the Warrington area, uses "nesh".


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Bradders
Senior Member


1880 Posts
Posted - 05/12/2010 : 08:40
Ooooo is that where Fascist come from too ?


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wendyf
Senior Member


1439 Posts
Posted - 05/12/2010 : 13:04
Can't think what you could possibly mean BraddersInnocent. If you were talking about sweet, helpful people who offer assistance now & then, they come from Yorkshire.


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belle
VIP Member


6502 Posts
Posted - 05/12/2010 : 19:11
My answer to Bradders disappeared, but it went something like this..Are you answerig Wendy or stanley? Wendy I think Bradders is referring to something Stanley said on the previous page...but this problem of people getting so used to talking to each other they forget to put reference points in the reply is making some topics almost impossible to follow..check out "what caught your attention?"  at times it sounds like the hubub of the old folks lounge with people appearing to address thin air!


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wendyf
Senior Member


1439 Posts
Posted - 05/12/2010 : 19:46
Ah I see, fascinate and fascist! Thanks for pointing that out Belle, I was feeling so guilty about having a go at Bradders on another topic, I assumed he was having a dig at me. Phew!
I like the idea that fellies and fellows derive from the same source, if not it is a very similar one. Equal partners, equal portions.


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catgate
Senior Member


1764 Posts
Posted - 05/12/2010 : 22:27
There is a place just south of Kettlesing Bottom that is called Felliscliffe.

I mention this because it may have have been connected with  experimentation with stone cartwheels.

Alternatively it may have been a place where worn out wheels were hurled over the edge.


Every silver lining has a cloud.


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 06/12/2010 : 06:20
Catty, Ekwall gives 'Felfesclif' in Domesday, 'Cliff or slope with newly cultivated land' . Either from Old English 'fealg' to break uup land or 'Fealu' OE for fallow land.  He mentions OE 'Felg' a felloe in a wheel so you may be near the truth.

Wendy, fascinating association of felloes and fellows! Sounds good to me as the fundemental principle of the spoked wheel is that the varying load is spread amongst the spokes and some flexibility is built into the response.


Stanley Challenger Graham




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stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
wendyf
Senior Member


1439 Posts
Posted - 06/12/2010 : 07:14
Fellow comes fron the Old English "feolagi" and Old Norse " felag" or partnership. It's very close isn't it?


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Bradders
Senior Member


1880 Posts
Posted - 06/12/2010 : 12:41
Ooops ...!

I just came bck to this topic . You're right Belle , I should have put a reference on my post ........

See how much trouble you can get into during an "overlap" ...

Wendy beat me to the button by less than a minute....(08:39:33 against  08:40:22 !) sounds like Formula One...eh

So sorry for unintentionally calling anyone a Fascist , but they do usually know when I mean it.

And Please Don't feel guilty about "having a go at Old Bradders" Wendy ....

I've been insulted by professionals (for Money) ....Ha!

Edited by - Bradders on 06/12/2010 12:43:55 PM


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 07/12/2010 : 05:42
Fascism: In Italy generally thought to derive from 'fascismo' bundle, remember the symbol of the axe with the bundle of rods bound round it? 'Fascine' in military earthworks is a bank reinforced by bundles of branches.


Stanley Challenger Graham




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tripps
Senior Member


1404 Posts
Posted - 28/12/2010 : 10:41
There was a linguistics expert on R4 last night who wassaying that English, as spoken by the British, was becoming just a dialect version of the English as spoken increasingly throughout the world.  We represent just 60 million out of a total now approaching billions .  As a quick example he quoted  the form 'I am liking' rather than 'I like'  (Why do I think of Jilly Goolden here?) which derives from the Indian way of speaking English.  Inyteresting......


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 29/12/2010 : 06:18
There have always been different versions of English. US English is different in constructions than our version because it is a development of 18th century English. The French laugh at the version of French spoken by French-Canadians for the same reason, it derives from 18th C French. Bottom line is that language is a living thing and its course of development will vary in different environments. This even applies in the UK, look at the difference in the language in different parts of the country.


Stanley Challenger Graham




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Tizer
VIP Member


5150 Posts
Posted - 29/12/2010 : 10:08
Another strange effect on the English language comes, I think, from business & marketing people who have an increasing tendency to create new, longer words which they like to use instead of the traditional shorter versions, presumably hoping that it makes them sound more trendy and part of the `in crowd' and perhaps thinking that it sounds like they are doing something different. For example they might talk of `transportising' food to the supermarkets when all they mean is transporting or distributing. It strikes me as odd that this trend should happen in parallel with texting which shortens words!


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moh
Silver Surfer


6860 Posts
Posted - 29/12/2010 : 11:46
Watched Who do you think you are again yesterday (one of many repeats!!)  It is surprising how many of our sayings come from the miller.  Grinding to a halt was one, the stones grind to a halt when the wind drops.  Rule of thumb was another - the miller felt the flour between his finger and thumb to feel the fineness of the flour so he could decide whether to tighten the stones or not.  Another thing came to mind - the humble chamber pot - how did it become knoiwn as a po or jerry?


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TOM PHILLIPS
Steeplejerk


4164 Posts
Posted - 29/12/2010 : 21:06
I always thought rule of thumb was ,a man can only beat his wife with a stick that was less than the thickness of his thumb...



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