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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted -  14/11/2010  :  06:41
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Stanley Challenger Graham




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stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk
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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 18/11/2010 : 06:02
Never heard that one Brad. Never heard Tiz's 'tuckle' either.


Stanley Challenger Graham




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Bradders
Senior Member


1880 Posts
Posted - 18/11/2010 : 19:24
Anyone got ideas about why we say someone is a "Crosspatch" ?

....and often,  in guite a concilliatory manner ...."Awww ..don't be such an old Crosspatch"...


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 19/11/2010 : 04:35
All I can think of is a construct from 'cross', annoyed.


Stanley Challenger Graham




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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 21/11/2010 : 16:29
Rolt, in 'Landscape with Canals' says that in Worcestershire a wood pigeon was called a 'quice'. Anyone come across it?


Stanley Challenger Graham




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Bradders
Senior Member


1880 Posts
Posted - 21/11/2010 : 18:05
Not heard that one , but I have a farmer friend who is near Pershore ....I'll ask ..!


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 22/11/2010 : 05:27
Nearest thing I have come across is the Scots word for a heifer, 'quai' (spelling?) Pronouced 'kwy' as in why.


Stanley Challenger Graham




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wendyf
Senior Member


1439 Posts
Posted - 22/11/2010 : 08:25
A bit of googling turned up this:
Queest, quice, Quist etc. are archaic names for the ringdove or cushar.


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 23/11/2010 : 06:40
You've been neglecting your field-work Wendy! Nice, Rolt is usuallt accurate. Mind you, I'm reading his 'Victorian Engineers', a good overview of what was happening but he's fallen into the old trap of associating the conversion of beam engines to triple expansion with William McNaught of Rochdale. It was actually his cousin John in Scotland who patented the procedure. A widespread mistake which I try to mention as often as possible in the hopes that the correct version may spread!


Stanley Challenger Graham




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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 23/11/2010 : 07:59
Interesting old term in a report on the NZ mine explosion. The old Cornish mining term 'tommy knockers' meaning the noise a strata makes when it shifts. Often the precursor of a fall or an inrush of gas or water. Universally used in deep mining where English is the language.


Stanley Challenger Graham




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wendyf
Senior Member


1439 Posts
Posted - 23/11/2010 : 08:28
You have hit the nail on the head there Stanley, my field is seriously neglected! One day we will get round to doing the drainage and clearing the rushes.......Embarassed.


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belle
VIP Member


6502 Posts
Posted - 23/11/2010 : 16:34
Stanley I always thought "ki"  (k-eye) was old scots for the plural of cows.


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Tizer
VIP Member


5150 Posts
Posted - 23/11/2010 : 17:01
The Cornish miners thought the tommyknockers were helpful little people who knocked to warn them of danger or malevolent gremlins bringing them danger. Some miners would leave bits of food for them in the mine. As Stanley said, the noises were really the shifting of rock or the supporting timbers. The Cornish brewery Skinner's makes a `Cornish Knocker' ale whose label has a dubious image!


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 24/11/2010 : 06:17
Belle, the word I knew was used to refer to individual beasts I think.


Stanley Challenger Graham




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catgate
Senior Member


1764 Posts
Posted - 24/11/2010 : 10:49
I'm not sure if this should be here or in "What attracted you attention" so ...

Last night as I was flicking through the Freeview gamut of rubbish that passes for ....well I'm not sure what...with the remote control,  I happened across a programme which seemed to be a paeon to the Prince of Darkness..Peter Mandleson.

He sat, or lay there, looking for all the world like something constructed from the discarded bits left over  when they had finished putting together Barry Manelow. As he exuded vapid, self congratulatory tedium he lay back, rolling his head from side to side, giving the camera man, and the public, the once in a lifetime opportunity to almost climb up inside his nose and fully explore its vast interior.

I quickly moved on but at the next circuit  he was still there languidly spouting forth more platitudinous tripe in answer to what could only be "planted" questions from some sad young woman I never saw (may be it was just a disembodied voice from the Darkness)

I did another cicuit and some time later landed back again. He was still  at it. Rolling about and gazing into the distance and prattling away in his most affected manner.

...and suddenly that wonderful Bradford dialect expression came into my head "What a bl**dy great Jessie !"

 

Edited by - catgate on 24/11/2010 10:52:57 AM


Every silver lining has a cloud.


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tripps
Senior Member


1404 Posts
Posted - 24/11/2010 : 15:00
Back to your Scottish Heiffer...
I was on a course in  NE Scotland a long time ago, and stayed in a local pub/hotel.  I was unable to understand a word the locals said, when they were speaking to each other, and thought at first they were speaking Gaelic, but it was just the local dialect.  I do recall they called a girl a "quine" , and thanks to good old google have just confirmed it .  Seems it is peculiar to Aberdeenshire, which is where I was at the time. Perhaps derives from 'queen' ?
Where's Mr Gearce when you need him.......


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