Visit the historic Lancashire Textile Project with over 500 photos and 190 taped interviews|2|0
Previous Page    1  [2]  3   Next Page
Author Previous Topic Topic Next Topic  
haz66
Regular Member


297 Posts
Posted -  10/12/2009  :  20:47
I`m currently in the process of setting up a 250 ltr micro brewery in Barlick, and have totally come to a loss as to what to call the brewery, i have had a few thoughts but then decided against them all, which included.

Pendle Witch Brewery

Mill Town Brewery

White Rose Brewery.

So i just wondered if any of you could come up with something ?, something to do with a link to Barlick but catchy, i know some of you will have heard names that i havn`t so thought i would ask, 

PS if you suggest the name i go with there will be something in it, not sure what yet, but it will involve beer Wink


If you cant fix it with an hammer, you have an electrical problem.
Replies
Author
Previous Page    1  [2]  3   Next Page
 
Tizer
VIP Member


5150 Posts
Posted - 12/12/2009 : 11:14
Don't forget HM Revenue & Customs - they will want their slice!

Do you already have a yeast strain specially for this purpose? The National Collection of Yeast Cultures (NCYC) is at the Institute of Food Research in Norwich and includes many brewing strains:

http://www.ncyc.co.uk/contact.html


Go to Top of Page
haz66
Regular Member


297 Posts
Posted - 12/12/2009 : 13:52


quote:
Tizer wrote:
Don't forget HM Revenue & Customs - they will want their slice!

Do you already have a yeast strain specially for this purpose? The National Collection of Yeast Cultures (NCYC) is at the Institute of Food Research in Norwich and includes many brewing strains:

http://www.ncyc.co.uk/contact.html

Oh yes the HM Revenue will get there cut, but because i`m only brewing on such a small scale i do get 50% duty relief which at the percentage of beer i`ll be brewing for a start should equate to about 6p duty per pint, plus i also need a HM Revenue hydrometer as they are much more accurate, and send a sample of beer away to confirm its ABV.

I`ve been experimenting with quite a few different yeasts and the one i`m really happy with is just a bog standard yeast called Safale S-04  which attenuates really well and can clean up in around 3 to 4 days and leaves the beer crystal clear, sofor now i`ll be sticking with it.


If you cant fix it with an hammer, you have an electrical problem. Go to Top of Page
Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 12/12/2009 : 16:18
Attenuates eh! He's getting technical already!


Stanley Challenger Graham




Barlick View
stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
Mercury
Regular Member


233 Posts
Posted - 12/12/2009 : 17:31
Hi Haz, this is all very interesting! Our little micro, or should I say nano brewery has been up and running for several months now, we're up to gyle no 8. Our favourite yeast culture is the Brewlab Burton Ale. These slopes are produced at Suderland University as I'm sure you know. Unfortunately due to a fridge malfunction, our strain died and for the last batch we pitched Safale SO4, which is our standard fall-back. It's a very good settler as you say, but we find the flavour slightly lacking in the final beer. It also seems to be a top AND bottom worker, also I'm not sure about the alcohol tolerance - our FG was 1020. But at 5.2 ABV, (short) storage is helping the flavour to improve dramatically. Clarity is first class, we use copper finings and rapid wort cooling. What's your local water supply quality like?

Edited by - Mercury on 12/12/2009 5:37:06 PM

Edited by - Mercury on 12/12/2009 5:39:05 PM


Go to Top of Page
haz66
Regular Member


297 Posts
Posted - 12/12/2009 : 18:43


quote:
Mercury wrote:
Hi Haz, this is all very interesting! Our little micro, or should I say nano brewery has been up and running for several months now, we're up to gyle no 8. Our favourite yeast culture is the Brewlab Burton Ale. These slopes are produced at Suderland University as I'm sure you know. Unfortunately due to a fridge malfunction, our strain died and for the last batch we pitched Safale SO4, which is our standard fall-back. It's a very good settler as you say, but we find the flavour slightly lacking in the final beer. It also seems to be a top AND bottom worker, also I'm not sure about the alcohol tolerance - our FG was 1020. But at 5.2 ABV, (short) storage is helping the flavour to improve dramatically. Clarity is first class, we use copper finings and rapid wort cooling. What's your local water supply quality like?

Edited by - Mercury on 12/12/2009 5:37:06 PM

Edited by - Mercury on 12/12/2009 5:39:05 PM
Hi Mercury

Our water is really nice and soft, i only treat it with some gypsum and epsom salts to get the salt level back up for the mash, i`ve noticed better efficency if i treat as oppossed to not treating, wether or not i`m treating it correctly is another matter, but the final beers taste spot on so i`m of the feeling of not to mess too much with any other treatment at this time ?.

S04 is like marmite i think, some brewers wont brew with anything else and some wont touch it,but personally i`ve found that it seems to work very well so far on the beers i`ve tested it in, and managed to get the FG down to usually FG1006 - FG1008,mainly Blonde,Pale Ales, and Hoppy bitters, i dont brew any dark beers as i dont like them, i only brew what i like to drink Laughing because so far i`ve had to drink the majority of them, but i have passed them onto other brewers for their opinion and have had some really good positive feedback, thats why i`ve decided to start a nano myself.

Where abouts are you based as it may be worth coming to see you, for a little advice etc.

 


If you cant fix it with an hammer, you have an electrical problem. Go to Top of Page
thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 12/12/2009 : 19:20
How about "Barlick Beer Engine" Barlick is where you are, Beer is what you are making, Engines were made here and a Beer Engine is what you dispense it with!!! and for good measure, Good Luck. Thomo, Ex Landlord and Club Steward.


thomo Go to Top of Page
Mercury
Regular Member


233 Posts
Posted - 12/12/2009 : 19:31
Hi again, Hazz. Your water sounds similar to ours, treatment similar. We only do 25 litre batches so it's really only home brew size, but always full mash beers with genuine industry-standard ingredients. We only supply family and friends, but samples beers (in bottles) left in local pubs have been well received. We've  thought about upscaling the capacity and going commercial, but there's quite a lot of competition in our area (north of Wigan) with Prospect Brewery (Standish), Bank Top (Bollton), Allgates (Wigan) just to mention three,

As for sampling, it's tough isn't it!!

I think it's a great thing that you're doing and hope it all goes well, if you want a chat or meet up or whatever that's fine, just send me a PM.

Edited by - Mercury on 12/12/2009 7:40:48 PM


Go to Top of Page
Another
Traycle Mine Overseer


6250 Posts
Posted - 13/12/2009 : 08:17
Do we need a "Brewers Corner" ? Nolic


" I'm a self made man who worships his creator" Go to Top of Page
Tizer
VIP Member


5150 Posts
Posted - 13/12/2009 : 10:29
Haz and Mercury, are you both doing a traditional malted barley mash, drain the sweet wort, boil with hops, cool, then ferment the hopped wort? What temperature do you ferment at?


Go to Top of Page
Mercury
Regular Member


233 Posts
Posted - 13/12/2009 : 10:43
In our case that's exactly what we do. Fermentation temperature is between 18 to 22 Celsius,


Go to Top of Page
Tizer
VIP Member


5150 Posts
Posted - 13/12/2009 : 10:57
How do you go about draining the wort from the mash on a small scale? In a big brewery you've got a proper mash tun and the wort filters through the mash bed and out through the slotted copper false bottom. Filtering through the bed removes the `fines' and gives a clear wort. Can you get clear wort on the small scale or do you have to boil a cloudy wort and get rid of the coagulated fines before fermenting?


Go to Top of Page
thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 13/12/2009 : 11:07
"Another", you could be right, its a subject that holds quite a bit of interest and history. I have been around several breweries, the largest of which was the "Carlsberg" complex in Copenhagen. There in the bottling hall there were over two million bottles on the move. I have also been to "Tuborgs". At the other end of the scale, I have been around "Hook Norton" brewery, this one is small and is the only brewery in the UK to still have a running steam engine as part of its plant. I worked six evenings a week as a front of bar waiter in the "Railway Hotel" here in Barlick when Arthur O'Conner was the licensee, then as waiter and barman at the "Craven Hiefer" in Kelbrook for Harry Holden. Next was barman at the Band Club in Earby for Bob Jackman eventually taking over from Bob as Steward. During a spell of "Shore Time" in Pompey Barracks I was manager of the Regulating Branch Mess. My last experience of the trade was as Licensee of the Iorwerth Hotel at Bryngwran on Anglesey. Many local people have earned a bit extra working in pubs and clubs and many more have enjoyed the sevice that these dying places offered. As a footnote here, the signs proclaiming the Fosters Arms existence came down on Friday after the end of a few hundred years of sevice. Goodbye old friend.


thomo Go to Top of Page
Mercury
Regular Member


233 Posts
Posted - 13/12/2009 : 11:10
We have an insulated mash tun with a tube matrix at the bottom. The tubes have slots cut in the underside and don't get blocked. It's normal for the first portion of the wort to be run off to be cloudy, this is returned to the top of the mash. Within a few minutes the wort will run clear. Sparging continues until all traces of sweetness have disappeared by which time a full copper's worth has been collected. Temperature in the mash tun is around 66C, strike temperature around 77C, temperature drop over 90 minutes is 1 degree C.


Go to Top of Page
haz66
Regular Member


297 Posts
Posted - 13/12/2009 : 17:40


quote:
Mercury wrote:
We have an insulated mash tun with a tube matrix at the bottom. The tubes have slots cut in the underside and don't get blocked. It's normal for the first portion of the wort to be run off to be cloudy, this is returned to the top of the mash. Within a few minutes the wort will run clear. Sparging continues until all traces of sweetness have disappeared by which time a full copper's worth has been collected. Temperature in the mash tun is around 66C, strike temperature around 77C, temperature drop over 90 minutes is 1 degree C.

Ditto.

The wort then is indeed boiled with the hops, depending on the beer obviously depends on what hops and when they are added to the boil, its then force chilled after the boil to drop the temp of the wort down to around 20 deg C so you can pitch the yeast as quick as possible.


If you cant fix it with an hammer, you have an electrical problem. Go to Top of Page
haz66
Regular Member


297 Posts
Posted - 13/12/2009 : 17:48


quote:
Mercury wrote:
Hi again, Hazz. Your water sounds similar to ours, treatment similar. We only do 25 litre batches so it's really only home brew size, but always full mash beers with genuine industry-standard ingredients. We only supply family and friends, but samples beers (in bottles) left in local pubs have been well received. We've  thought about upscaling the capacity and going commercial, but there's quite a lot of competition in our area (north of Wigan) with Prospect Brewery (Standish), Bank Top (Bollton), Allgates (Wigan) just to mention three,

As for sampling, it's tough isn't it!!

I think it's a great thing that you're doing and hope it all goes well, if you want a chat or meet up or whatever that's fine, just send me a PM.

Edited by - Mercury on 12/12/2009 7:40:48 PM

We to have our fair share of breweries round here to,the biggest 2 being Thwaits (Blackburn) and Copper Dragon (Skipton) then there`s Moorhouses (Burnley), Old Bear (Keighley) Naylors (Cross Hills) Bowland (Clitheroe) and many many more to but that doesn`t put me off as i think if you can produce a good beer people will (well hopefully) buy it.


If you cant fix it with an hammer, you have an electrical problem. Go to Top of Page
Topic is 3 Pages Long:
Previous Page    1  [2]  3   Next Page
 


Set us as your default homepage Bookmark us Privacy   Copyright 2004-2011 www.oneguyfrombarlick.co.uk All Rights Reserved. Design by: Frost SkyPortal.net Go To Top Of Page

Page load time - 0.516