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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted -  26/11/2011  :  15:32
As a result of the research for the other topic "Barlick and Cravens Part in the Great War" some interesting material has emerged First and foremost are the names of Men from Barlick who are not included on the Town War Memorial. Just what qualifies a name to appear on there is difficult to establish and I started out with a list of 39 possibles, this is now down to 37 as two names are indeed already on the monument. "To err is human". There are five that meet my criteria, four born and resident in Barlick and one born in Salterforth and it is possible that he lived in Barlick, he may be on the Salterforth Memorial, this I have to check. One of the five is a Young Man who died in the canal at Skipton, The Coroners verdict was suicide, but the mans state of mind could not be established, he was still a Soldier, Born, and a resident of Barlick and buried at Ghyll I believe that whatever the cause he has a right to recognition. I have had a great deal of help and support in my endeavours from Mr Chris Foster of CPGW and I feel sure he will have a valuable input to make with this new topic. I would also like to hear what the Townsfolk have to say, and with the possibility of a publication in the future I may have a word with a contact at the BET Newspaper, somebody out there may know something useful, and so to the first five names and unedited details:-



Edited by - thomo on 27/11/2011 11:28:44 AM


thomo
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panbiker
Senior Member


2301 Posts
Posted - 27/11/2011 : 09:48
I think that would be a good idea Peter, could raise the profile within the community. It is recommended that any proposed alterations to war memorials are fully publicised to the general public anyway to ensure there are no objections or other unforseen obstacles.

I would wait though, until we have some more information with regard to council responsibilities,  policies and potential costings. That way any such article or coverage would be fully informed of what we are trying to achieve.

I think Chris is right though in that we need a small steering group with a common purpose to manage any proposal that we may wish to put forward.

 


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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 27/11/2011 : 10:08
I will be guided by you Ian in regards to council matters of which I know little. Later I will put out a call to any possibly interested parties. In regard to the press, I will have a word with my Niece who prior to retirement was the Editor of Clitheroe's version of the BET. She still has many contacts.


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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 27/11/2011 : 11:33
I have edited Pte A Green out of the heading as it was too lengthy, now placed here:-

Surname: GREEN

Forename(s): Arthur

Place of Birth: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Residence: -----

Service No: 333429

Rank: Private

Regiment/Corps/Service: Highland Light Infantry

Battalion/Unit: -----

Division: division unknown

Age: --

Date of Death: 1917-09-06

Awards: -----

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: P. 4.

CWGC Cemetery: GILL UNDENOMINATIONAL BURIAL GROUND, BARNOLDSWICK

CWGC Memorial: -----

Non-CWGC Burial: -----

Comments:

Arthur Green may have been a member of either the 1/9th or the 2/9th (Glasgow Highland) Battalion Highland Light Infantry. At the time of his death the 1/9th were serving on the Western Front and the 2/9th in Ireland.

Craven's Part in the Great War Entry:

(Not in CPGW - CH entry 1917-09-14)

Article Date: 14 September 1917
GREEN - September 7th 1917, found drowned in the Leeds and Liverpool Canal at Skipton, Private Arthur Green, of 5, Powell Street, Barnoldswick.

Article Date: 14 September 1917
DISTRESSING TRAGEDY AT SKIPTON
Barnoldswick Soldier's Suicide
A distressing tragedy occurred at Skipton in the early hours of Friday morning last when a soldier from the War Auxiliary Hospital in Granville Street (Skipton and District Hospital) committed suicide in the Leeds and Liverpool Canal. The deceased was Private Arthur Green, of the Highland Light Infantry, and of 5, Powell Street, Barnoldswick. He was suffering from gastric ulcer, and he had been undergoing treatment at the Hospital since July last. His condition had varied, but the previous night he appeared much brighter. He was in charge of Miss Berry, a probationary nurse, who last saw the deceased about 2-40 on Friday morning when she passed through the ward. She noticed that Green did not appear to be asleep, and on returning about ten minutes later she found that deceased's bed was empty. She reported the matter to the Matron, and Miss Eggins roused several of the convalescent soldiers, who searched the grounds without success. Eventually, however, one of them found a pair of army socks on the allotments footpath adjoining the canal. The police were informed, and with the aid of grappling irons P.S. Pryke recovered the body from the centre of the canal. The body was conveyed to the hospital where Dr. Knight tried artificial respiration for half an hour but without avail. Dr. Knight had attended the deceased since August 28th. A few days previous to the event deceased was very ill and unconscious, but he rallied again and appeared to be progressing.
THE INQUEST
Mr. Edgar Wood (district coroner) conducted the inquiry at the Skipton Workhouse on Friday afternoon.
Probationer Nurse Berry said she was at present on night duty at he Skipton District Hospital, and had 34 parents under her care, including the deceased. None of them were seriously ill and did not require more attention than she could give them. The deceased had been under her care for the past six weeks and he was suffering from gastritis. She never thought there wasanything wrong with him mentally, but she believed he had worried about the chance of having to go abroad, and at seeing a man who had returned with the loss of his legs. Witness last saw him at twenty minutes to three that morning. He was in bed, but witness did not think he was asleep. She did not speak to him but went to another ward. On returning about ten or fifteen minutes later she at once noticed that he was missing, his bed being empty. There were nine other men in the ward, eight of whom she knew were asleep. She looked round for the deceased, and being unable to find any trace of him she reported the matter to the matron. It would have been easy for the deceased to get out of the hospital through the windows, but he had never done so before. He was a very quiet man, but she had not thought it necessary to call the doctor's attention to him. He had complained of a good deal of pain lately. She had found no letter. He was unconscious the previous Tuesday night and she at once called the matron, and she (witness) stayed with him.
James Green, 8, Low West Avenue, Barnoldswick, gave evidence of identification. He said his son enlisted about twelve months ago. In Judy he came home on ten days' sick leave and he was too ill to return. He was taken to the Skipton War Auxiliary Hospital. His son was never strong. Witness and deceased's wife saw him early on Tuesday morning in response to a special summons. He had been unconscious all the night. He stayed until 8 a.m., and his wife remained at the hospital all day. Witness never suspected that he would commit suicide, for he had never threatened to do such a thing. A cousin, however, did drown himself some time ago in the canal at Barnoldswick.
P.B. Pryke said he was informed that the deceased was missing at four o'clock that morning. He went to the hospital and was told that a pair of army socks bad been found in the allotments on the hospital side of the canal. It was quite near. Witness noticed that the grass leading direct from the path to the water was beaten down. He could not see any thing in the water, which gradually deepened from 2½ feet to 6 feet. He at once secured the grappling irons, and at 5-15 a.m. he recovered the body from the centre of the canal and right opposite where the socks had been found. He took it to the hospital and Dr. Knight tried artificial respiration but without success. The deceased was wearing a pair of trousers and a shirt. His legs and arms were quite free and he saw no signs of any struggle. Had the deceased got into the water accidentally he could have got out again had he wanted to.
Miss Eggins, the Matron, said that deceased was admitted to the hospital on July 7th. She had seen him every day since his admittance and she had never noticed that there was anything wrong with him mentally. He had not been seriously ill, but had an attack of unconsciousness the previous Tuesday morning. She had not a serious case in the hospital, and one nurse was quite sufficient to look after the whole of the 34 patients. She thought deceased was a morose sort of man and was not particularly sociable with the other patients. Witness heard a little before three o'clock that morning that the deceased was missing, and she at once telephoned for the doctor and to the police. Deceased could easily get out of the hospital, and his trousers would be close to him. All the other patients had said they never saw deceased get up.
Dr. Knight said he had been attending the deceased about ten days for gastritis On Tuesday he was unconscious, which he thought was due to a blood clot, but later he recovered. On Wednesday morning he complained of pain in the chest. He had never shown any sighs of insanity. Deceased had never said anything to him about going to the front. He was satisfied that deceased had died from drowning. He did not think it necessary to have a nurse in attendance on the patients all the time.
The jury found that the deceased committed suicide, but that there was not sufficient evidence to show the state of his mind at the time.
THE FUNERAL
The funeral of Pte. A. Green, whose untimely end under such distressing circumstances has evoked universal sympathy, took place on Monday afternoon at Gill Cemetery, and was attended by several of deceased's ward-mates from the Skipton Military Hospital. A short service was conducted at the house by the. Rev. A. Bradfield (Wesleyan Minister), who also officiated at the cemetery. Among the numerous floral tributes were wreaths from the matron and the staff of the Hospital and Messrs. Brigs Bros. (printers), deceased's former employers.



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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 27/11/2011 : 11:53
This mornings work has revealed seven more Men who although born elsewhere were resident in Barlick in WW1. One of these was not only awarded the Military Medal, but also the Croix de Guerre. at least one is buried at Ghyll, none are on the Memorial. There is another man who may have been resident here but his name is on another Memorial. During this morning whilst looking at CPGW I came across a list of those who are not on any memorial in Craven, a very long list with hundreds of names on it. So here come the next seven Men.

Surname: BARRETT

Forename(s): Peter

Place of Birth: Cononley, Yorkshire

Residence: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Service No: 88959

Rank: Gunner

Regiment/Corps/Service: Royal Garrison Artillery

Battalion/Unit: 192nd Heavy Bty.

Division: not applicable

Age: 29

Date of Death: 1918-06-18

Awards: -----

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: 263

CWGC Cemetery: MIKRA BRITISH CEMETERY, KALAMARIA

CWGC Memorial: -----

Non-CWGC Burial: -----

Comments:

1901 Nelson Census: 11, Chatham Street - Peter Barrett, aged 12, born Cononley, son of John and Jane Barrett.

Craven's Part in the Great War Entry:

(Not in CPGW - found in SD)

West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record Entry:

Data from Commonwealth War Graves Commission Records

Surname: BARRETT

Forename(s): Peter

Nationality: United Kingdom

Service No: 88959

Rank: Gunner

Regiment: Royal Garrison Artillery

Unit: 192nd Heavy Battery

Age: 29

Awards: -----

Died Date: 1918-06-18

Additional Info: Son of John and Jane Barrett, of Nelson, Lancs.

Data from Soldiers Died Records

Surname: BARRETT

Forename(s): Peter

Born: Cononley, Yorkshire

Residence: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Enlisted: Keighley, Yorkshire

Number: 88959

Rank: Gunner

Regiment: Royal Garrison Artillery

Battalion: -----

Decorations: -----

Died Date: 1918-06-18

Died How: Died

Theatre of War: Salonika

Notes: -----



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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 27/11/2011 : 12:14
Surname: NICHOLSON

Forename(s): John Robert

Place of Birth: Lancaster, Lancashire

Residence: -----

Service No: 46470

Rank: L/Corporal

Regiment/Corps/Service: Northumberland Fusiliers

Battalion/Unit: 13th (Service) Battalion

Division: 21st Division

Age: --

Date of Death: 1917-06-16

Awards: -----

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: Bay 2 and 3.

CWGC Cemetery: -----

CWGC Memorial: ARRAS MEMORIAL

Non-CWGC Burial: -----

Comments:

Craven's Part in the Great War Entry:

(Not in CPGW - CH entry 1917-07-20)

West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record Entry:

Data from Commonwealth War Graves Commission Records

Surname: NICHOLSON

Forename(s): John Robert

Nationality: United Kingdom

Service No: 46470

Rank: L/Corporal

Regiment: Northumberland Fusiliers

Unit: 4th Battalion

Age: --

Awards: -----

Died Date: 1917-06-19

Additional Info: -----

Data from Soldiers Died Records

Surname: NICHOLSON

Forename(s): John Robert

Born: Lancaster, Lancashire

Residence: -----

Enlisted: Keighley, Yorkshire

Number: 46470

Rank: L/Corporal

Regiment: Northumberland Fusiliers

Battalion: 13th Battalion

Decorations: -----

Died Date: 1917-06-16

Died How: Died

Theatre of War: France & Flanders

Notes: Formerly 32969 Durham Light Infantry

Article Date: 20 July 1917
BARNOLDSWICK - MISSING
Mrs. Nicholson, 62, Rainhall Road, Barnoldswick, has been officially notified that her husband, Private John Robert Nicholson, Northumberland Fusiliers, has been posted missing since June 16th. He had been in France eight months, and before joining up was a weaver employed by the Bankfield Manufacturing Co. Mr. and Mrs. Jas Warburton, of the same address, whose son-in-law he was, have also two sons at the Front.


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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 27/11/2011 : 12:15
Surname: HARGRAVES

Forename(s): James

Place of Birth: Nelson, Lancashire

Residence: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Service No: 327880

Rank: Private

Regiment/Corps/Service: Labour Corps

Battalion/Unit: 733rd Coy

Division: not applicable

Age: 30

Date of Death: 1917-10-01

Awards: -----

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: III. E. 136.

CWGC Cemetery: BAILLEUL COMMUNAL CEMETERY EXTENSION (NORD)

CWGC Memorial: -----

Non-CWGC Burial: -----

Comments:

British Army WW1 Medal Rolls Index Cards: Pte James Hargreaves, 327880, Labour Corps.

Craven's Part in the Great War Entry:

(Not in CPGW - found in SD)

West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record Entry:

Data from Commonwealth War Graves Commission Records

Surname: HARGRAVES

Forename(s): James Haworth

Nationality: United Kingdom

Service No: 4592

Rank: Private

Regiment: Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment)

Unit: transferred to 327880, 733rd Coy Labour Corps

Age: 30

Awards: -----

Died Date: 1917-10-01

Additional Info: Son of Elisabeth Hargraves

Data from Soldiers Died Records

Surname: HARGREAVES

Forename(s): James

Born: Nelson, Lancashire

Residence: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Enlisted: Skipton, Yorkshire

Number: 327880

Rank: Private

Regiment: Labour Corps

Battalion: -----

Decorations: -----

Died Date: 1917-10-01

Died How: Died

Theatre of War: France & Flanders

Notes: Formerly 4592, West Riding Regiment.


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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 27/11/2011 : 12:17
Surname: WILSON

Forename(s): James

Place of Birth: Great Harwood, Lancashire

Residence: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Service No: 12989

Rank: Private

Regiment/Corps/Service: East Lancashire Regiment

Battalion/Unit: 6th (Service) Battalion

Division: 13th (Western) Division

Age: 24

Date of Death: 1915-08-09

Awards: -----

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: Panel 113 to 117.

CWGC Cemetery: -----

CWGC Memorial: HELLES MEMORIAL

Non-CWGC Burial: -----

Comments:

1901 Great Harwood Census: 78, James Street - James Wilson, aged 11 years, born Great Harwood, son of John and Mary Wilson.

Craven's Part in the Great War Entry:

(Not in CPGW - found in SD)

West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record Entry:

Data from Commonwealth War Graves Commission Records

Surname: WILSON

Forename(s): James

Nationality: United Kingdom

Service No: 12989

Rank: Private

Regiment: East Lancashire Regiment

Unit: 6th Battalion

Age: 24

Awards: -----

Died Date: 1915-08-09

Additional Info: Son of John Wilson, of 27, Lower West Avenue, Barnoldswick, Yorks.

Data from Soldiers Died Records

Surname: WILSON

Forename(s): James

Born: Great Harwood, Lancashire

Residence: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Enlisted: Ramsbottom, Lancashire

Number: 12989

Rank: Private

Regiment: East Lancashire Regiment

Battalion: 6th Battalion

Decorations: -----

Died Date: 1915-08-09

Died How: Killed in action

Theatre of War: Gallipoli

Notes: -----

ALLIPOLI, 1915
6th (Service) Bn. East Lancashire Regiment
It had fallen to the East Lancashire to play a part in the third and last attempt to carry the Sari Bair Ridge, the principal objective of the August offensive.
It was nearly six o'clock (a.m.) [9th August] when the two leading companies of the East Lancashire reached the position from which the attack was to be launched. The way forward led across some level cornland, known as The Farm, about half a mile wide which formed a kind of shelf amid the hills. Beyond this was the almost cliff-like end of Chunuk Bair, and on each flank were lower ridges held by the enemy.
Without any hesitation, although already under fire, the two leading companies of the East Lancashire deployed and advanced across the open, at once to be smitten in enfilade by a hail of shrapnel and streams of machine-gun bullets...The whole battalion now pressed forward though officers and men were falling fast . . . The battalions in the rear were thrown into the fight as they came up, but the Turks were well prepared and strongly posted, and there was now no hope of success... the survivors of the attack lay where they were until at dusk it became possible to withdraw to the edge of the Farm plateau where a line was entrenched . . . Of the East Lancashire not many more than 100 men remained.
[James Wilson was killed on the 9th August.]


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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 27/11/2011 : 12:18
Surname: GOLDING

Forename(s): George A.

Place of Birth: Burnley, Lancashire

Residence: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Service No: 266285

Rank: Sergeant

Regiment/Corps/Service: Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment)

Battalion/Unit: 2/7th Battalion

Division: 62nd (2/West Riding) Division

Age: 41

Date of Death: 1921-11-26

Awards: M.M., Croix de Guerre, M.I.D.

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: -----

CWGC Cemetery: -----

CWGC Memorial: -----

Non-CWGC Burial: BARNOLDSWICK, GILL UNDENOMINATIONAL BURIAL GROUND

Comments:

No entry in SD - post-War.

Not identified in CWGC (post CWGC cut-off date).

British Army WW1 Medal Rolls Index Cards: Sergeant G. Golding, 266285, West Riding Regiment.

The battalion of George A. Golding was found in 'West Riding Territorials in the Great War,' (Laurie Magnus).

Craven's Part in the Great War Entry:

(Not in CPGW - CH entry 1921-12-02)

West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record Entry:
Data from Commonwealth War Graves Commission Records

Surname: -----

Forename(s): -----

Nationality: -----

Service No: -----

Rank: -----

Regiment: -----

Unit: -----

Age: --

Awards: -----

Died Date: -----

Additional Info: -----

Data from Soldiers Died Records

Surname: -----

Forename(s): -----

Born: -----

Residence: -----

Enlisted: -----

Number: -----

Rank: -----

Regiment: -----

Battalion: -----

Decorations: -----

Died Date: -----

Died How: -----

Theatre of War: -----

Notes: -----

Article Date: 15 March 1918
BARNOLDSWICK - French Decoration for Barnoldswick Sergeant
The French War Medal has been conferred upon Sergeant George Golding, Duke of Wellington's Regiment, for conspicuous gallantry and devotion in the attack on Boulon Wood on 27th November last. A native of Burnley he was formerly a well-known footballer associated with the Accrington Club and later with the Barnoldswick United. He enlisted in the Duke of Wellington's three years ago, but did not go out to France until February of last year. Sergt. Golding is a married man, his wife and daughter residing at 34, Town head, Barnoldswick.

Article Date: 02 December 1921
BARNOLDSWICK - War Hero's Death
The circumstances of the death of ex-Sergeant George A. Golding, of 34 Town Head, which occurred on Saturday after prolonged illness, are particularly sad. The deceased, who was 41 years of age, and leaves a widow and two children, was a native of Burnley, but had resided at Barnoldswick for many years. He followed the occupation of twister and loomer in the employ of Mr. G. Dethick Brown. Crownest Shed. His first introduction to the town was as a player for the old Barnoldswick United Football Club, of which he was captain when the team first won the Craven Cup. Enlisting in 'Kitchener's Army' in the early days of the war, he served right through to the end, and emerged from the struggle practically unscathed, notwithstanding his participation in some of the heaviest fighting. While serving as private in the Duke of Wellington's he received the Military Medal and the Croix de Guerre, was mentioned in despatches for gallant conduct during the battle at Bourlon Wood, and was promoted to the rank sergeant for bravery on the field. On his discharge from the Army with a temporary pension, he resumed his former occupation, but before long his health broke down and about 10 months ago he underwent an operation at Beckett's Park Hospital, Leeds. This did not result in recovery, and his pension in the meantime had been discontinued on the ground that his illness was not attributable to war service. Some time subsequent to his discharge from hospital it appears that Golding appealed to the Army Medical Commissioners for a re-examination, and by the irony of fate a communication granting this request came to hand on the day he died. Steps are now being taken with the object of securing a pension for the widow. The interment took place at Gill Cemetery on Wednesday afternoon, members of the Ivory Hall Working Men's Club acting as bearers. Wreaths were placed on the coffin from the Ivory Hall and the Discharged Sailors' and Soldiers' Club.

 

 

Article Date: 15 March 1918
FRENCH DECORATION FOR BARNOLDSWICK SERGEANT
The French War Medal has been conferred upon Sergt. George Golding, Duke of Wellington's Regiment, for conspicuous gallantry and devotion in the attack on Bourlon Wood on Nov. 27th last. A native of Burnley, he was formerly a well-known footballer associated with the Accrington club and later with the Barnoldswick United. He enlisted in the Duke of Wellington's three years ago, but did not go out to France until February of last year. Sergt. Golding is a married man., his wife and daughter residing at 34, Town Head, Barnoldswick.


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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 27/11/2011 : 12:19
Surname: CROWTHER

Forename(s): James H.

Place of Birth: Bacup, Lancashire

Residence: -----

Service No: -----

Rank: Sergeant

Regiment/Corps/Service: East Lancashire Regiment

Battalion/Unit: -----

Division: division unknown

Age: --

Date of Death: 1917-08-26

Awards: -----

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: -----

CWGC Cemetery: -----

CWGC Memorial: -----

Non-CWGC Burial: BARNOLDSWICK - UNSPECIFIED

Comments:

No entry in SD or CWGC - discharged soldier.

1901 Barnoldswick Census: James H. Crowther, aged 22 years, born Bacup, Lancashire, son of William and Grace Crowther.

Craven's Part in the Great War Entry:

(Not in CPGW - Pioneer entry 1917-08-31)

West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record Entry:

Data from Commonwealth War Graves Commission Records

Surname: -----

Forename(s): -----

Nationality: -----

Service No: -----

Rank: -----

Regiment: -----

Unit: -----

Age: --

Awards: -----

Died Date: -----

Additional Info: -----

Data from Soldiers Died Records

Surname: -----

Forename(s): -----

Born: -----

Residence: -----

Enlisted: -----

Number: -----

Rank: -----

Regiment: -----

Battalion: -----

Decorations: -----

Died Date: -----

Died How: -----

Theatre of War: -----

Notes: -----

Article Date: 27 October 1916
BARNOLDSWICK - A Drill-master's Appointment
Staff-Sergt.-Instructor Jas. H. Crowther, of Powell Street, Barnoldswick, has been appointed staff instructor of the Skipton Cadet Company. Mr. Crowther has had twelve years' service in the Manchester Regiment, from which he was discharged medically unfit three years ago. During the present war he rejoined the Army on Lord Kitchener's appeal for ex.-N.C.O.'s, but was discharged again for the same reason after four months' service as instructor in the East Lancs. Regiment. In September of last year he was appointed drill instructor of the Barnoldswick Special Constabulary, and immediately afterwards of the Barnoldswick (E Coy.) Cadets, both of which he has raised to a high standard of proficiency. At a recent inspection of platoon and company drill of the Barnoldswick Cadets, he was very highly commended by Capt. Lord, the Divisional Inspector. The E Company have commenced miniature rifle practice at the Drill Hall where they have taken over the rifles and ammunition lately used by the Barnoldswick Rifle Club.

Article Date: 12 January 1917
BARNOLDSWICK - CADETS' BENEFIT
By the kindness of Mrs. Palmer benefit performances in aid of the local Cadet Corps were given at the Alhambra Theatre on the first three evenings of the week. The cadets (1st and 2nd Companies) themselves supplied one part of the programme by giving, under the direction of Staff-Sergt. Instructor J.H. Crowther, a military scena illustrative of 'A Day in a Soldier's Life.' Commencing with 'Reveille,' the exhibition comprised Swedish drill and other military exercises, in which the lads displayed a remarkable proficiency. A 'route march' with drums and bugles during which the young bloods gave tongue to 'Tipperary' and other classics tickled the audience immensely. The scena was concluded with the 'Last Post' and bivouac. In the second half Mr. Crowther and two young lady pupils gave a clever exhibition of club swinging and single stick exercises.

Article Date: 31 August 1917
BARNOLDSWICK - DRILL INSTRUCTOR'S DEATH AND FUNERAL
The death occurred on Sunday last, at his residence, 44, Mosley Street, of Staff-Sergeant-Instructor James H. Crowther, eldest son of the late Mr. Wm. Crowther, of Buck Street, Barnoldswick. The deceased had served five years in the Manchester Regt., and seven years on the reserve, when he was discharged in 1913, with the rank of Corporal. He re-enlisted on August 5th, 1914, and joined the East Lancashire Regt., in which he was given sergeant's rank, obtaining his discharge owing to heart affection after seven months' service. He was 39 years of age and leaves a wife and one child in arms. Both before and since the present war Segt. Crowther took a deep interest in the Boy Scout and Cadet movements and as instructor to both sections exerted a powerful influence over the boys, amongst whom he was held in high esteem. Latterly, he had also acted in the capacity of instructor to the Special Constabulary. The funeral at Gill Church on Wednesday afternoon was of a semi-military character, the cortege being preceded by the local cadets with muffled drums and reversed arms, followed by the special constables, wearing their regulation caps and armlets. The cadets were in charge of Capt. Lord (O.C. for the Keighley District) and Capt. F. Baldwin, and the specials in charge of Inspector Killeen and Mr. F.H. Slater (section leader). The burial service was conducted by the Rev. J. Lord, curate. Wreaths were placed upon the coffin from the officers of the Cadet Corps and the Special Constabulary

Article Date: 31 August 1917
CROWTHER - August 26th, 1917, at 44, Mosley Street, Barnoldswick, Staff-Sergeant-Instructor James H. Crowther, aged 39 years.

 

 

Article Date: 31 August 1917
DRILL INSTRUCTOR'S DEATH AND FUNERAL

The death occurred on Sunday last, at his residence, 44, Mosley Street, of Staff-Sergt. Instructor James H. Crowther, eldest son of the late Mr. Wm. Crowther, of Buck Street, Barnoldswick. The deceased had served five years in the Manchester Regiment, and seven years on the Reserve, when he was discharged in 1913 with the rank of Corporal. He re-enlisted on Aug. 5th, 1914, and joined the East Lancashire Regiment, in which he was given sergeant's rank, obtaining his discharge owing to heart affection, after seven months' service. He was 39 years of age, and leaves a wife and one young child. Both before and since the present war Sergeant Crowther took a deep interest in the Boy Scout and Cadet movements, and as instructor to both sections exerted a powerful influence over the boys, amongst whom he was held in high esteem. Latterly he had also acted in the capacity of instructor to the Special Constabulary. The funeral at Gill Church on Wednesday afternoon was of a semi-military character, the cortège being preceded by the local Cadets with muffled drums and reversed arms, followed by the Special Constables, wearing their regulation caps and armlets. The Cadets were in charge of Captain Lord (officer commanding for the Keighley district) and Captain F. Baldwin, and the Specials in charge of Inspector Killeen and Mr. F.H. Slater (section leader).The burial service was conducted by the Rev. J. Lord, curate. Wreaths were placed upon the coffin from the officers of the Cadet Corps and the Special Constabulary


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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 27/11/2011 : 12:20
This mans name is not on the Salterforth Memorial I understand, but he has a CWGC Headstone at Ghyll.

Surname: WILSON


Forename(s): John

Place of Birth: Salterforth, Yorkshire

Residence: -----

Service No: 265498

Rank: Sergeant

Regiment/Corps/Service: Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment)

Battalion/Unit: 2/6th Battalion

Division: 62nd (2/West Riding) Division

Age: 28

Date of Death: 1921-01-21

Awards: -----

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: -----

CWGC Cemetery: BARNOLDSWICK (ST MARY-LE-GILL) CHURCHYARD

CWGC Memorial: -----

Non-CWGC Burial: -----

Comments:

No entry in SD - post-War.

1911 Barnoldswick Census: 20, Shaw Terrace, Park Road - John Wilson, aged 18 years, born Salterforth, son of Anna Bella Wilson.

British Army WW1 Medal Rolls Index Cards: Corporal John Wilson, 26549, West Riding Regiment. [This entry is probably for Sergeant John Wilson, 265498.]

Craven's Part in the Great War Entry:

(Not in CPGW - CWGC headstone, Barnoldswick Cemetery)

West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record Entry:

Data from Commonwealth War Graves Commission Records

Surname: WILSON

Forename(s): John

Nationality: United Kingdom

Service No: 265498

Rank: Sergeant

Regiment: Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment)

Unit: 2nd/6th Battalion

Age: 28

Awards: -----

Died Date: 1921-01-21

Additional Info: -----

Data from Soldiers Died Records

Surname: -----

Forename(s): -----

Born: -----

Residence: -----

Enlisted: -----

Number: -----

Rank: -----

Regiment: -----

Battalion: -----

Decorations: -----

Died Date: -----

Died How: -----

Theatre of War: -----

Notes: -----

Edited by - thomo on 27/11/2011 12:26:48 PM


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jgh
New Member


4 Posts
Posted - 27/11/2011 : 12:50
Shame these names have just come to light. I was in Ypres on the 24th and 25th and could have left my respects at the Menin gate ceremony. At least  the next time I go Iwill find names accordingly.


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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 27/11/2011 : 13:31
Welcome Jeff.  I have just had this mail from Chris:-

Hi Peter, my friend and colleague at CPGW, John Richardson sent me this email this morning. He's in the process of going over our records and adding new information that as become available since our last major update to the site in January 2011. One example is Willie Dowd. You may wish to alter your posting to make it more up to date.

Regards

Chris

 

Hello Chris,

I have just had a look at 'OneGuyFromBarlick' website and noticed his list of possibles for the war memorial. Some of our information on men from Barnoldswick has been updated of altered since our last update - one that comes to mind is Willie Dowd as it is not long since I altered some of his info. which I will list below.

Willie Dowd was born at Darwen, Lancashire . (SDGW gives his place of birth as Barnoldswick.)

Comments:

1901 Darwen, Lancashire Census: 9, Edmund Street - William Dowd, aged 2 years, born Darwen, son of Elizabeth Dowd [née Baron], married woman.

1911 Barnoldswick, Yorkshire Census: 29, Essex Street - William Dowd, aged 12 years, born Darwen, Lancashire . [William Dowd, senior, a widower, and four sons, were living with his sister-in-law, Ruth Alice Southworth, née Baron. Ruth's cousin, John Southern (201268), was also living with her.]

British Army WW1 Medal Rolls Index Cards: Private Willie Dowd, 3/11284, West Riding Regiment. Guardian - Mrs. Ruth Alice Southworth, 29 Essex Street , Barnoldswick, Colne. Lancs.

Regards,

John.

Jeff, is this a relative:

Surname: HOLMES

Forename(s): Wilfred

Place of Birth: Addingham, Yorkshire

Residence: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Service No: 10990

Rank: Private

Regiment/Corps/Service: Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment)

Battalion/Unit: 8th (Service) Battalion

Division: 11th (Northern) Division

Age: 20

Date of Death: 1917-04-27

Awards: -----

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: D. 6.

CWGC Cemetery: HERMIES BRITISH CEMETERY

CWGC Memorial: -----

Non-CWGC Burial: -----

Comments:

Brother-in-law of Elijah Sutcliffe (WR/25667) and William Hartley Sutcliffe (1324).

Craven's Part in the Great War Entry:

PRIVATE WILFRED HOLMES, Duke of Well.'s Regt., son of Mr. William Holmes, Addingham, killed in action 27th April, 1917. Aged 20 years.

West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record Entry:

HOLMES, Wilfred, aged 20 years, West Riding Regiment, son of the late Mr. Wm. Holmes of Addingham and Mrs. Holmes of Lower Brook Street, [Barnoldswick], killed in action April 27, 1917

Data from Commonwealth War Graves Commission Records

Surname: HOLMES

Forename(s): Wilfred

Nationality: United Kingdom

Service No: 10990

Rank: Private

Regiment: Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment)

Unit: 8th Battalion

Age: 20

Awards: -----

Died Date: 1917-04-27

Additional Info: Son of William and Sarah Ann Elizabeth Holmes, of Addingham, Yorks.

Data from Soldiers Died Records

Surname: HOLMES

Forename(s): Wilfred

Born: Addingham, Yorkshire

Residence: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Enlisted: Skipton, Yorkshire

Number: 10990

Rank: Private

Regiment: Duke of Wellington's (West Riding Regiment)

Battalion: 8th Battalion

Decorations: -----

Died Date: 1917-04-27

Died How: Killed in action

Theatre of War: France & Flanders

Notes: -----

Article Date: 17 September 1915
BARNOLDSWICK CASUALTIES IN GALLIPOLI
In a letter to his mother, Mrs. Holmes, 20, Wellington Street, Barnoldswick, Private Wilfred Holmes, 'Z' Company, Duke of Wellington's Regiment, writes:- "Just a few lines hoping you are in the best of health, as it leaves me at present. Excuse writing paper, as we cannot get any more here. We have now been out here in this hell for nearly three weeks, and are just longing for a good rest out of reach of shells and bullets. Our division have lost terribly heavy. There are only about 800 of our regiment left now all told, and one officer. I am not going to tell you anything of what I have seen, but I have seen what I never wish to see again. I saw Harry Hayes go down the trench the other day. (Hayes lived at 41, Wellington Street). He had been hit in the thigh by the look of him. He said "It has nearly broken me in two." Eddie Bottomley got wounded on the jaw, and Hartley Dent, another Barlicker, got killed. He was a stretcher bearer, I think. A parcel would be a treat. I have not received a letter or anything yet, and home is our whole study."

Article Date: 22 October 1915
BARNOLDSWICK - PARCELS FOR SOLDIERS IN THE DARDANELLES
Complaints have been rife for some time past in regard to the non-delivery of parcels sent out to soldiers in the Mediterranean Expeditionary Force. A case was brought to our notice a day or two ago where a quantity of seasonable luxuries, including cake, cigarettes and other articles representing a value of 10 shillings, all securely packed in a biscuit tin, was sent to a Barnoldswick soldier at the end of July. With the object of making delivery doubly sure, the consignee was advised of its despatch by registered letter, which, together with an additional half crown for postage, makes it rather an expensive matter for the senders. The fact that neither the registered letter nor the parcel had been received up to the date of his last letter suggests that the good things have fallen into hands for which they were not destined. Happily, this is not often the case.
Pte. Wilfred Holmes, of the 'Z' Company of the Duke of Wellington's in the Dardanelles, writing to his mother at 20, Wellington Street, Barnoldswick, says:- "Just a line to let you know I am still keeping going. We are now in the reserve trenches, and they give us a few shells now and again. We have had six days in the firing line. The last day we were in the Turks got the range with some of their guns and blew the front of the trench in right where I was. One fellow had his collarbone broken, another his leg broken, and another got hit in the head. You should have seen us sorting ourselves out of the earth and sandbags. I received the parcel from ----- and it was all right up to the mark. I see from the paper that a lot of our fellows have got home with their wounds."

Article Date: 12 November 1915
ADDINGHAM - The Turk a Fair Fighter
Wilfred Holmes writes [to Mr. Flint. of Addingham] from Egypt:-
"Just a few lines to let you know I received parcel. We had a very hot time of it when we made this new landing here, and for the first three weeks we never seemed to be out of it, but the last six weeks it has been quieter-a little dust up now and again to let us know they were still there. We must give the Turk his due; he is a good and fair fighter. There are hundreds of wells they could have poisoned if they had so wished, but they kept a good watch over them, so that if you wanted water you had to run risks to get it."

Article Date: 11 February 1916
BARNOLDSWICK
Private Wilfred Holmes of the 8th Duke of Wellington's writes to his mother (20 Wellington Street):- "Just a few lines to let you know that I am still in the best of health. We could not write letters for the last few weeks, we were on the Peninsula. Now we are on an island about 15 miles from Suvla. There are only about 40 of old 8th who have not been wounded."

Article Date: 11 May 1917
ADDINGHAM - PRIVATE WILFRED HOLMES
Pte. Wilfred Holmes, Duke of Wellington's, who has been reported killed in action in France on the 27th ult., was the youngest son of the late Mr. Wm. Holmes, stonemason, of Addingham, and Mrs. Holmes, Lower Rook Street, Barnoldswick. Though only 20 years of age, Pte. Holmes had been in the Army close upon three years, having enlisted in September 1914. His first experience of actual warfare was gained in Gallipoli, where he landed with the 29th Division at Suvla Bay, going through that disastrous campaign unscathed, although his battalion was reduced to a mere handful of men. After the evacuation he spent some time at Mudros and in Egypt, being drafted out to France in December last.
In a letter of condolence to the bereaved family, Sec.-Lieut. J. P. Sugden writes:- "He was one of our best lads, loved by everyone in the Co., and we mourn the loss of a brave soldier and a good comrade. On behalf of the officers, N.C.O.s and men of the Company I beg to tender my sincere sympathy in your bereavement."
Mrs. Holmes has another son and a son-in-law in France.

Article Date: 11 May 1917
HOLMES - April 27th 1917, killed in action in France, Pte. Wilfred Holmes, Duke of Wellington's Regiment, youngest son of the late Mr. Wm. Holmes, stonemason, of Addingham, and Mrs. Holmes, Lower Rook Street, Barnoldswick, aged 20 years

Article Date: 25 May 1917
ADDINGHAM - SOLDIERS LETTERS
Mr. Flint has received letters in acknowledgment of parcels sent out.
Pte. Harry Spencer writes:- "We are in reserve now and we shall be going up again in a few days to have another pop at Fritz. Sorry to hear that Wilf. Holmes has been wounded. I am going to his Company to get the right news. I have got to know that he died from gun-shot wounds in his side."

Article Date: 01 June 1917
BARNOLDSWICK - THE LATE PRIVATE WILFRED HOLMES - An Officer's Tribute
Mrs. Holmes, 53, Lower Rook Street, Barnoldswick, has received the following letter from Capt. H.G. Griffin, Duke of Wellington's Regiment, in reference to the death of her son, Private Wilfred Holmes, who was killed in France on the 27th April:-
Empress Eugenie's Hospital,

Farnborough,

22nd May, 1917.
"Dear Mrs. Holmes, - I have not been allowed to write before, as I was wounded in the head a day or two before your son was killed. As, however, I was for some months his Company commander, I would like to write to you with regard to him. I myself sent in his recommendation for the Military Medal for his gallantry at Stuff Redoubt, and was very sorry he did not receive it, especially as I forwarded it as a result of a vote from the whole Company. He was chosen by the other men, which is a real honour, and in their opinion and in mine deserved the medal. I had also promised to make him a non-commissioned officer at the first vacancy. You will understand, therefore, how very sorry I am that he was killed. He was a brave lad, a gallant soldier, and a credit to the regiment, which will miss him. You have my very real sympathy. - Yours sincerely, H.G. GRIFFIN, Captain"
Pte. Holmes enlisted directly after the outbreak of war, and was 20 years of age. He took part in the Dardanelles campaign, being with the 20th Division at Suvla Bay landing. A letter received from a comrade (Pte. Ennie Bottomley) states that Pte. Holmes was working with the R.E.s cutting trees down when he met his death. It was nearly dark when a machine gun was turned on them and Wilfred got a German bullet in his left side. "He was well liked in the Battalion, and was my best pal. He was buried as soon as possible, along with ten more of our battalion. He has done his bit, having been through every battle we have been through."

Article Date: 26 April 1918
HOLMES - In loving memory of Private Wilfred Holmes, who was killed in action in France April 27th, 1917.
It may be a soldier's honour

For his country's sake to fall;

But we who feel the sorrow

Don't think of the glory at all.
From his loving Mother, Sister and Brothers, 16 York Street, Barnoldswick.
HOLMES - In loving memory of Private Wilfred Holmes, who was killed in action in France April 27th, 1917.
Sleep on, dear brother, in a far-off land,

A place we may never see;

So long as life and memory last,

We will remember thee.
From his loving Sister and Brother-in-law, Jane and John (on active service), Middle Nook, Wadsworth.
HOLMES - In loving memory of our dear brother, Wilfred Holmes, aged 20, of the Duke of Wellington's Regiment, who was killed in action at Hermies, April 27th, 1917.
"Gone home to God from earth's battlefields."
Ever remembered by his Sister at Silsden, and Brother-in-law in France

Article Date: 25 April 1919
HOLMES - In loving memory of Private Wilfred Holmes, killed in France April 27th, 1917.
Like ivy on a weathered oak,

When all things else decay;

Our love for him shall still keep green

And never fade away.
From his loving Sister and Brother, Middle Nook, Wadsworth.
HOLMES - In loving memory of Private Wilfred Holmes, killed in France April 27th, 1917.
In the bloom of his youth death claimed him,

In the pride of his manhood days;

None knew him but to love him,

None mention his name but with praise.

From his loving brother and Sister, Nook Farm, Wadsworth.
HOLMES - In loving memory of my dear brother, Private W. Holmes, aged 20 years, Duke of Wellington's Regiment, who was killed in action in France, April 27th, 1917.
Also of our dear husband and daddy, Private E. Sutcliffe, aged 34 years, of the Royal Engineers, who died of pneumonia in Belgium, February 12th, 1919.
"Until the day breaks."
From A. Sutcliffe and Children, Silsden.
HOLMES - In loving memory of a dear son and brother, Private Wilfred Holmes, 8th Duke of Wellington's, who was killed in action at Hermies, France, April 27th, 1917.
"Their name liveth evermore."
Ever remembered by his Mother and Sisters, 20 Wellington Street, Barnoldswick.

Article Date: 23 April 1920
HOLMES - In loving memory of Wilfred Holmes, killed in France April 27th, 1917.
Over the distance in a hallowed acre,

Where wooden crosses mark the simple mounds,

Quite unadorned except by trailing mosses,

They sleep at last where quiet rest abounds,

Where silent stars their vigil keep

He giveth his beloved sleep.
Always remembered by Mother and Sisters, Wellington Street, Barnoldswick.

 

 

Article Date: 22 October 1915
PARCELS FOR SOLDIERS IN THE DARDANELLES
Complaints have been received for some time past in regard to the non-delivery of parcels sent out to soldiers in the Mediterranean Expeditionary Force. A case brought to our notice a day or two ago where a quantity of seasonal luxuries, including cake, cigarettes and other articles representing a value of 10s., all securely packed in a biscuit tin, was sent to a Barnoldswick soldier at the end of July. With the object of making delivery doubly sure the consignee was advised of its despatch by registered letter which, together with an additional half-crown for postage, makes it rather an expensive matter for the sender. The fact that neither the registered letter nor the parcel had been received up to the date of his last letter, suggests that the good things have fallen into hands for which they were not destined. Happily this is not often the case.
Private Wilfred Holmes, of the 'Z' Company, Duke of Wellington's, in the Dardanelles, writing to his mother at 20 Wellington Street, Barnoldswick, says:- "Just a line to let you know I am still keeping going. We are now in the reserve trenches, and they give us a few shells now and again. We have had six days in the firing line. The last day we were in the Turks got the range with some of their guns and blew the front of the trench in right where I was. One fellow had his collarbone broken, another his leg broken and another got hit in the head. You should have seen us sorting ourselves out of the earth and sandbags. I received the parcel from ----- and it was all right - up to the mark. I see from the paper that a lot of our fellows have got home with their wounds.

Article Date: 12 November 1915
ADDINGHAM
Mr. Flint, of Addingham has received the following letters in acknowledgement of parcels sent out:-
Wilfred Holmes writes from Egypt:- Just a few lines to let you know I received parcel. We had a very hot time of it when we made this new landing here, and for the first three weeks we never seemed to be out of it, a little dust up now and again to let us know they were still there. We must give the Turk his due. He is a good and fair fighter. There are hundreds of wells. They could have poisoned if they had so wished, but they kept a good watch over them, so that if you wanted water you had to run risks to get it.

Article Date: 06 October 1916
ADDINGHAM SOLDIERS' LETTERS
Mr. Flint has received the following letters in acknowledgement of parcels sent out:-
Pte. Wilfred Holmes, writing to his sister, says:- "I have seen a few Addingham lads out here lately. We were over the top in action a few days ago, and our company went for the front line. When we got over it seemed impossible to live in such a fire, but the few of us who did get there routed the Bosch out of their dug-outs. They were glad to be taken prisoners. I saw a couple killed who were chained to a machine gun." Holmes was in at the landing and evacuation of Suvla Bay. He has been on active service since July 2nd 1915. His only brother is in hospital, having been invalided from the Front.

Article Date: 11 May 1917
BARNOLDSWICK CASUALTIES
Pte. Wilfred Holmes, of the Duke of Wellington's Regiment, who has been reported killed in action in France on the 27th ult., was the youngest son of, the late Mr. Wm. Holmes, stonemason, of Addingham, and Mrs. Holmes, Lower Brook Street, Barnoldswick. Though only 20, years of age, Pte. Holmes had been in the army close upon three years haying enlisted in September, 1914. His first experience of actual warfare was gained in Gallipoli, where he landed with the 29th Division at Suvla Bay, going through that disastrous campaign unscathed, although his battalion was reduced to a mere handful of men. After the evacuation he spent some time at Mudros and in Egypt, being drafted out to France in December last. In a letter of condolence to the bereaved family Sergt. J.P. Sugden writes:- "He was one of our best lads, loved by everyone in the Company, and we mourn the loss of a brave soldier and a good comrade. On behalf of the officers, N.C.O.'s men of this Company I beg to tender my sincere sympathy in your bereavement." Mrs. Holmes has another son and a son-in-law in France.

Article Date: 11 May 1917
HOLMES - Killed in action in France, April 27th, Pte. Wilfred Holmes, of the Duke of Wellington's West Riding Regiment, son of the late Mr. Wm. Holmes, of Addingham, and Mrs. Holmes, of Lower Brook Street, Barnoldswick, aged 20 years.

Article Date: 25 May 1917
ADDINGHAM SOLDIERS LETTERS
Mr. Flint has received the following letters in acknowledgement of parcels sent out:-
Pte. Harry Spencer writes:- Thanks for parcel. We are having some lovely weather at present and very hot, too; we can well do with it to keep our appetites from getting too high for these big dinners. We are in reserve just now, and we shall be going up again in a few days to have another pop at Fritz. Sorry to hear that Wilf. Holmes has been wounded. I am going to his company to get the right news. I have got to know that he died from gun-shot wounds in his side.

Article Date: 01 June 1917
THE LATE PTE. WILFRED HOLMES - An Officer's Tribute
Mrs. Holmes, 53, Lower Rook Street, Barnoldswick, had received the following letter from Capt. H. G. Griffin, Duke of Wellington's Regiment, in reference to the death of her son, Pte. Wilfred Holmes, who was killed in France on the 27th of April: -
Empress Eugenie's Hospital, Farnborough, 22nd May, 1917.
"Dear Mrs. Holmes, - "I have not been allowed to write before, as I was wounded in the hand a day or two before your son was killed. As, however, I was for some months, his Company Commander I would like to write to you with regard to him. I myself sent in his recommendation for the Military Medal for his gallantry at Stuff Redoubt, and was very sorry he did not receive it, especially as I forwarded it as a result of a vote from the whole company. He was chosen by the other men, which is a real honour, and in their opinion and in mine deserved the medal. I had also promised to make him a non-commissioned officer at the first vacancy. You will understand therefore how very sorry I am that he was killed. He was a brave lad, a gallant soldier and a credit to the regiment which will miss him. You have my very real sympathy. Yours sincerely, H.G. Griffin, Capt."
Pte. Holmes enlisted directly after the outbreak of war, and was 20 year of age. He took part in the Dardanelles campaign, being with the 29th Division at Suvla Bay landing. A letter received from a comrade (Pte. Eddie Bottomley), states that Pte. Holmes was working with the Royal Engineers cutting trees down when he meet his death. "It was nearly dark when a machine gun was turned on them, and Wilfred got a German bullet in his left side. He was well liked in the battalion. and was my best pal. He was buried as soon as possible along with ten more of our battalion. He has done his bit, having been through every battle we have been through."

Ilkley Gazette - June 16th 1916
Addingham News - Letters from Soldiers
Wilfred Holmes, in a letter to Mr. C. Flint, from France acknowledging a parcel says - We are having lovely weather out here and it makes a lot of difference. It is bad enough being in the trenches when it is fine. I spent all my Easter above the knees in mud and water, quite a change from Egypt. I called to see Jack England on my way to the trenches and back. He has not been in yet, but he has had a few shells burst near where he works the other day and he and Wilkinson were very lucky to escape. We have a fairly easy time when not in the trenches, we have a band concert every night and it just keeps us alive but we cannot help feeling a bit fed up sometimes. I wish it would come to an end before many more lives are lost.

Ilkley Gazette - July 14th 1916
Private Wilfred Holmes whose wife and child live at 4 Railway View, Addingham is believed to be missing, he was orderly to Captain Allen Clough who has been reported missing. Holmes who is 20 years of age was before the war employed by Messrs. D. Illingworth and Son of Bradford

Ilkley Gazette - October 13th 1916
German Chained to a Machine Gun
Private Wilfred Holmes of Addingham before going to the Western Front served with one of the West Riding Battalions at Suvla Bay, in a letter to his sister at Addingham he mentions that he had taken part in a good deal of fighting on the Somme and had experienced a terrible time. "When we got over the top of the parapet" he says "it seemed impossible to live in such a fire but the few of us that did get through routed the Bosches out of their dug-outs. They were glad to be taken prisoner. I saw a couple of them get killed. They were chained to a machine gun".


Edited by - thomo on 27/11/2011 1:33:07 PM


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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 28/11/2011 : 12:01
Here is one that should have been in the first group. On the Memorial there is Pte Robert Fay but not his Brother, Pte John Fay both of Arthur St:-

Surname: FAY

Forename(s): John

Place of Birth: Padiham, Lancashire

Residence: Barnoldswick, Yorkshire

Service No: 1706

Rank: Private

Regiment/Corps/Service: East Lancashire Regiment

Battalion/Unit: 1/4th Battalion

Division: 42nd (East Lancashire) Division

Age: 20

Date of Death: 1915-06-04

Awards: -----

CWGC Grave/Mem Ref: Panel 113 to 117.

CWGC Cemetery: -----

CWGC Memorial: HELLES MEMORIAL

Non-CWGC Burial: -----

Comments:

Brother of Robert Fay (1748). Step-brother of Albert Deacey (39687).

Craven's Part in the Great War Entry:

(Not in CPGW - CH entry 1915-09-24)

West Yorkshire Pioneer Illustrated War Record Entry:
Article Date: 24 September 1915
Private Herbert Fay, A.S.C. and Private John Fay, East Lancashire's, are well known in Barnoldswick, where they worked prior to joining the colours.

Article Date: 06 August 1915
BARNOLDSWICK MAN IN THE DARDANELLES
Driver H. Fay, grandson of Mr. Bob Whalley, of Arthur Street, Barnoldswick, writing from Florinna Hospital at Malta, to Mrs. A.T. Scott, of 169, Burnlea Terrace, Gisburn Road, Barnoldswick, gives some of his impressions of the fighting in the Dardanelles. He says:- "I suppose you know I have been in the Dardanelles for two months, and it was a bit hot. I was, however, sent away from the Dardanelles with enteric fever, and I have been on milk diet for a month. I have been through it since I have been on active service, I can tell you. I don't think the Turks will stick it long. They have had an awful licking. Our boys just showed them how to fight. Our John (his brother), has been wounded in the neck and arm. I don't think he will be any use for work again. I suppose I shall have to go out again after I have had a furlough. Well, I came through without a scratch once, and I can do it again with a bit of luck."

1/4th Bn. East Lancashire Regiment
JUNE 1915
Third Battle of Krithia (4th). 'D' Company and 1 platoon of 'C' moved forward with 1st Essex 12 noon. Led attack from right of Ghurka Bluff towards Krithia. Leading waves met with strong rifle and machine gun fire upon leaving trenches. First three lines of Turkish trenches taken within few minutes. Attack continued - 4th line carried by 3 p.m. and consolidated. Casualties - Lieutenants P. Wolf and H.W. Whalley, Second Lieutenants T.A. Heywood and C. Crewe, 32 other ranks killed; 2 officers 159 other ranks wounded; 2 officers, 14 other ranks missing.

[John Fay was one of the missing.]



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jgh
New Member


4 Posts
Posted - 28/11/2011 : 12:23
John

Thanks for the information on Wilfred Holmes. there is a very good chance he is related, I am checking the family records to find any more information.

Jeff


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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 01/12/2011 : 11:16
The tally thus far is Group "A" :-

Pte Arthur Green.  Pte Edmondson Pickles.  Pte Walton Pickover and Pte Herbert Ewart Whipp, this one to be left off at the families request.

Group "B" :-

Gunner Peter Barrett.  L Cpl John Robert Nicholson.  Pte James Hargraves.  Pte James Wilson,  Pte Willie Dowd.  Sgt, George A Golding.  Sgt, James H Crowther and Sgt, John Wilson.
I am still looking at group "C" which is already down by 50%.



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