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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted -  14/11/2010  :  06:41
New version to make loading easier'

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Stanley Challenger Graham




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stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk
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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 01/04/2011 : 03:40
Did you know that Jasmit publications was based in  Padiham?


Stanley Challenger Graham




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stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
gearce
Regular Member


941 Posts
Posted - 01/04/2011 : 07:53
"gaun gyte" = gone daft


LANG MEY YER LUM REEK

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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 02/04/2011 : 06:26
How about 'After you Claude. No, after you Cecil.' Used to be very popular during the war. Radio catch phrase? ITMA?


Stanley Challenger Graham




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belle
VIP Member


6502 Posts
Posted - 07/04/2011 : 10:37
Was that meant to be on the famous quote page Stanley?
This may not be dialect but this morning I asked my youngest where my wesskit was and realised few would pronounce it that way these days.


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 08/04/2011 : 05:08
Stop nagging Belle, it just came into my head. I still pronounce waistcoat like that. Have we ever looked at 'Cleg' for a horse fly?


Stanley Challenger Graham




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Bodger
Regular Member


892 Posts
Posted - 08/04/2011 : 09:06
Horse fly no, but i seem to recall "Cleg" as a boot sole stud ?


"You can only make as well as you can measure"
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panbiker
Senior Member


2300 Posts
Posted - 08/04/2011 : 09:48
Are you sure it's not "Segs" Bodge?

I seem to remember they came on a card as a set for left and right, heel and toe.

Found this link on the net.


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belle
VIP Member


6502 Posts
Posted - 08/04/2011 : 09:54
Not nagging Stanley, just confused! Cleg definitely a horsefly in lowland scots, jinny spinner is a daddy longlegs, slater is a woodlouse.


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 09/04/2011 : 06:50
I think Ian may be right, also used for callouses on your hands I think.


Stanley Challenger Graham




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Bodger
Regular Member


892 Posts
Posted - 09/04/2011 : 10:00
Panbiker, i stand corrected,

Stanley yes ,segs= callouses


"You can only make as well as you can measure"
                           Joseph Whitworth
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panbiker
Senior Member


2300 Posts
Posted - 10/04/2011 : 20:38
I will agree with both of you re  it's use for callouses. I have inherited one or two myself while building my new shed for the yard.


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 11/04/2011 : 03:59
When I was picking milk kits up my hands were like leather. I remember picking a hot coal up one night that had fallen out of the fire and replacing it at the Bull Inn and a woman sat across from me thought it was some sort of trick.


Stanley Challenger Graham




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Tizer
VIP Member


5150 Posts
Posted - 11/04/2011 : 11:31
Found this in the journal of the Royal Institution of Cornwall from around the 1850s...

--------------
Friday in Lide is the name given to the first Friday in March, from lide, an Anglo-Saxon name for this month. I have heard this archaism only among tinners, where it exists in such sayings as this : " Ducks wan't lay till they've a drink'd lide water."
---------------

This was in the same journal article...

The Tinner, dressed in "blanketing coat," and slouching in huge pachydermatous boots, is a being as strange as he is picturesque. At home and by his fire of piled-up turves, he is no less interesting for the peculiar manner of his life, unchanged from ancient times, and for the stores of wild tradition with which he will unreservedly entertain you if long acquaintance have entitled you to his confidence. I have long known the tinners of the ancient district of Blackmoor, and here put on record a few of the special observances, with their meaning, which have been perpetuated from remote ages to our own times by those engaged in this old branch of Cornish industry.

The first red-letter day in the tinner's calendar is Paul's Pitcher day, or the eve of Paul's Tide (January 24th). It is marked by a very curious and inexplicable custom, not only among tin-streamers, but also in the mixed mining and agricultural town and neighbourhood of Bodmin, and among the sea-faring population of Padstow. The tinner's mode of observing it is as follows :— On the day before the Feast of St. Paul, a water-pitcher is set up at a convenient distance, and pelted with stones until entirely demolished. The men then leave their work, and adjourn unto a neighbouring ale-house, where a new pitcher, bought to replace the old one, is successively filled and emptied, and the evening is given up to merriment and misrule.

On enquiry whether some dim notion of the origin and meaning of this custom remained among those who still keep it up, I find it generally held to be an ancient festival intended to celebrate the day when tin was first turned into metal, — in fact, the discovery of smelting. It is the occasion of a revel, in which, as an old streamer observes, there is an open rebellion against the water-drinking system which is enforced upon them whilst at work. This custom is not quite peculiar to tinners, but is, as has been aid, observed elsewhere — with variations. 


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Bradders
Senior Member


1880 Posts
Posted - 11/04/2011 : 13:22
I'm going to enquire about this custom locally Peter.....There's a chap who runs a junk shop in Delabole who knows lots about real Cornish things....His name is Stuart Biddick , he's getting on now....He told me recently about his father ,Arthur, who played  cello on the original BBC recording of "Boscastle Breakdown" ....here's a link that describes the event , but Stuart mentions a "Mr Kennedy , from the BBC who did the recordings and provided all the beer !" (not  Dimbleby....unless they were together, of course) .

http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:ePGf2ix-lcgJ:www.an-daras.com/dance/d_danceindex_p_boscastlebreakdown.htm+boscastle+breakdown&cd=6&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=uk&source=www.google.co.uk

Edited by - Bradders on 11/04/2011 1:23:36 PM


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Tizer
VIP Member


5150 Posts
Posted - 11/04/2011 : 20:11
A junk shop in Delabole...must remember that when I next pass that way. I can't resist junk shops if there's a chance they might have old postcards!

The full text of the 1886-87 Journal of the Royal Institution of Cornwall (where I got the above info) is available on this web page but it has been scanned in so you have to work your way around the scanning errors. But there's lots of interesting stuff.


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