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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted -  14/11/2010  :  06:41
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Stanley Challenger Graham




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stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk
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Bradders
Senior Member


1880 Posts
Posted - 12/04/2011 : 00:17
"Bookmarked" that  link  to sift through later...Thanks.!

 


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 12/04/2011 : 04:44
Interesting stuff Tiz. Never heard of Lide before. What struck me was the impression the antiquarian gives of observing an alien race when he spoke to the tinner. The early archaeologists of the time interpreted most of their find as Roman because of their classic education and it makes me wonder whether we do the same thing unconciously. One thing is certain, the more we learn the smarter our distant ancestors look!


Stanley Challenger Graham




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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 12/04/2011 : 04:47
"I wonder if "Bobby dazzler"  has been done on the "Dialect"  Topic ...... ?" (Bradders)


Stanley Challenger Graham




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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 12/04/2011 : 05:18
Just used 'fed up' in a reply to a topic and it struck me that the origin of the phrase is having to eat the same thing over and over again. I'll bet it's universal?


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Tizer
VIP Member


5150 Posts
Posted - 12/04/2011 : 09:14
"One thing is certain, the more we learn the smarter our distant ancestors look!" - Stanley

Especially when we look at places like the Neolithic village at Skara Brae, Orkney, where the houses had toilets flushed by running water and they had stone `dressers' on which they placed their ornaments (pretty shells, carved stones etc).

http://www.orkneyjar.com/history/skarabrae/


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Bradders
Senior Member


1880 Posts
Posted - 12/04/2011 : 19:40
I'm not sure "fed up" is that universal.....I got a bit of stick for saying  "right fed up" in Berkshire...

How about "Stouwed off" meaning the same thing ?.......I think it might be Geordie

Edited by - Bradders on 12/04/2011 11:24:56 PM


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catgate
Senior Member


1764 Posts
Posted - 12/04/2011 : 20:26
"Fed up"  soundto me just like something someone would say when they had eaten very well and had "had enough".


Every silver lining has a cloud.


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Bradders
Senior Member


1880 Posts
Posted - 12/04/2011 : 23:23
This is an interesting one .....

It really depends on how it's said  (a bit like " now then" ...discussed earlier...- q.v.?)

If you say "I'm a bit fed up about that " ....then it's fairly "light".

.....but if someone were to say "I'm really fed up !" with enough  feeling , it's close to depression.

Stanley and Cat....It looks food related , but I wonder.......


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Tizer
VIP Member


5150 Posts
Posted - 13/04/2011 : 09:08
Collins gives `fed up' as short for `fed up to the back teeth' which reinforces the food origin.


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belle
VIP Member


6502 Posts
Posted - 13/04/2011 : 10:25
When my mum used to say "oo I am fed up!" I knew it was serious...fed up to the back teeth implies feeling sick, and to say "I'm sick of it all" would certainly define my mothers meaning  of fed up!
Somehng that is interesting me right now is how ancient spelling, because it was phonetic, gives a real sense of accent. My youngest is doing middle english and her pronounciation of the words as she reads Chaucer sounds to me like an Italian accent, given that Latin was prevelant amongst scholars, and Britain had been under Roman occupation that is not as far fetched as it seems.
In the Yorkshire census my ancestors name is spelled completely wrong Santwary is what the Yorkshire census taker has written, what he had said to him was Sanctuary with Norfolk accent. So reading out loud seems to be a requirement if we are going to understand early documents and census.


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catgate
Senior Member


1764 Posts
Posted - 13/04/2011 : 12:29


quote:
Tizer wrote:
Collins gives `fed up' as short for `fed up to the back teeth' which reinforces the food origin.

That was a nice little memory jogger for me, Tizer. I can remember my father using that expression occasionally when I was a weeny, but I can not remember hearing it since and I had forgotten it. He was a rather imperurbable, gentle soul and consequently he used the expression very seldom.


Every silver lining has a cloud.


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tripps
Senior Member


1404 Posts
Posted - 13/04/2011 : 12:37
Wasn't this expression replaced to some extent by "browned off".  Perhaps around the time of WWII?


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belle
VIP Member


6502 Posts
Posted - 13/04/2011 : 15:00
I would have put browned off before fed up to the back teeth, and cheesed off later than both!


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tripps
Senior Member


1404 Posts
Posted - 13/04/2011 : 18:55
I've looked up the chronolgy of these expressions in my Cassell  Slang book

Fed up  (and the intensifier    "to the back teeth")    19th C.
Browned off  - 1930's  (Military)
Brassed off  - 1940's
Cheesed off  - 1940's
P****d off  -  1940's  (USA)

I like that word intensifier.....

Edited by - tripps on 13/04/2011 6:56:30 PM


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Bradders
Senior Member


1880 Posts
Posted - 14/04/2011 : 01:43
and  "Staowed off "  (I've tried to spell it phonetically)  ?

I'm pretty sure it comes from Durham , or there abouts.......

Anybody else heard it .....?

(Later) I just did a Google search and it came up with this....

http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:9rwvto5AR3UJ:www.thedialectdictionary.com/view/letter/Durham/2474/+stowed+off&cd=1&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=uk&source=www.google.co.uk

......so it means "fed up " .......apparently , Doh !

Edited by - Bradders on 14/04/2011 01:53:04 AM


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