Visit the historic Lancashire Textile Project with over 500 photos and 190 taped interviews|2|0
Go to Page
  First Page  Previous Page    20  21  22  [23]  24  25   Next Page  Last Page
Author Previous Topic Topic Next Topic  
Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted -  14/11/2010  :  06:41
New version to make loading easier'

Old topic is HERE


Stanley Challenger Graham




Barlick View
stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk
Replies
Author
Go to Page
  First Page  Previous Page    20  21  22  [23]  24  25   Next Page  Last Page
 
Tizer
VIP Member


5150 Posts
Posted - 21/07/2011 : 10:15
Catching up on this thread...the shampoo/hair cream brand, Bradders, was spelt Silvikrin and it's still around. Brylcreem...it's always struck me as an odd choice of scent that was used in traditional Brylcreem. If you've ever walked past a field of broad beans in flower you'll find it's almost exactly the same!

Stanley said "One of the synonyms for ointment is 'jack'". I wonder if this usage is related to `blackjacking', as used to mean painting tar on a wall to prevent dampness?

I agree about the emphasis in speech often being on the wrong vowel nowadays. Some of it is due to the American influence (or re-introduction to UK from US as SCG correctly says) but another reason is that radio and TV presenters frequently do it now. Perhaps it's due to reading from a script or a memorised script. Whatever, it's getting very obvious and sometimes confusing! They also place emphasis on the wrong parts of sentences: e.g. instead of "Barlick will see EXTENSIVE periods of sunshine today" they might say "Barlick WILL SEE extensive periods of sunshine today".

Edited by - Tizer on 21/07/2011 10:21:19


Go to Top of Page
Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 22/07/2011 : 06:40
Many years ago their was a controversy about the correct emphasis of syllables in controversy. I don't think the controversy was ever satisfactorily resolved. I always thought it was a no-brainer, think of the emphasis used in controversial. If there is to be any emphasis at all it should be on the last syallable. Notice that nowadays most people get round it by not using any emphasis at all in controversy.


Stanley Challenger Graham




Barlick View
stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
Bodger
Regular Member


892 Posts
Posted - 22/07/2011 : 09:04
Reminds me of infant school, i had a discussion with the teacher regarding the word water and it's pronounciation & spelling ie "warter", i suggested that the way we pronounced it "watter" was a better way of remebering the spelling, but i was shot down


"You can only make as well as you can measure"
                           Joseph Whitworth
  Go to Top of Page
Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 22/07/2011 : 09:19
Isn't it always the same! How about 'water in the bath'?


Stanley Challenger Graham




Barlick View
stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
Bodger
Regular Member


892 Posts
Posted - 22/07/2011 : 10:24
I have a bAth not a barth, abarth is a modified Fiat !


"You can only make as well as you can measure"
                           Joseph Whitworth
  Go to Top of Page
belle
VIP Member


6502 Posts
Posted - 22/07/2011 : 10:26
Bodge, I used to have a little spat with a friend from dahn sath over the pronunciation of A in words...correcting his dance (darnse) to dance (danse) . Eventually I pipped him by asking ..do you eat arples or apples?


Life is what you make itGo to Top of Page
Tizer
VIP Member


5150 Posts
Posted - 22/07/2011 : 15:55
A British colleague of mine always gets annoyed by people spelling `sulphur' the US way, with an F (sulfur). When they defend the use of the US spelling he asks them "Do you spell phosphorus as fosforus?"

I heard someone  talking about `damping down' an argument and it made we wonder why we use `damp down'. I know cars have dampers and so do flues. But why damp as in `wet'? Looked in the dictionary and found it comes from the German word for steam, `dampf', but that still doesn't satisfy my curiosity. Could it be because when you throw water on a fire you get a lot of steam (dampf)?


Go to Top of Page
Bodger
Regular Member


892 Posts
Posted - 22/07/2011 : 22:41
You damp down a boiler, a good phrase ! Stanley, you close the damper, but why damper, nowt to do with damp ?


"You can only make as well as you can measure"
                           Joseph Whitworth
  Go to Top of Page
Bradders
Senior Member


1880 Posts
Posted - 23/07/2011 : 00:14
In blues music the term "Turn your damper down (Low) "  has a sexual connotation.....Usually to do with a man wanting his partner to "good" during his absence....


BRADDERS BLUESINGER Go to Top of Page
belle
VIP Member


6502 Posts
Posted - 23/07/2011 : 01:52
Leaving  the dampers aside for  a moment..I was trying to explain to a teenager the origin of the phrase "Every preston guild" but apart form saying the preston guild never met...I couldn't really say more..someone enlighten me!


Life is what you make itGo to Top of Page
Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 23/07/2011 : 05:09
Preston Guild used to be every 20 years I think, next one is 2012. As for damper, I always thought it was used in the sense of suppressing something, like fire with water or air flow with the damper. I had never made the connection with the German word for steam but it makes sense.


Stanley Challenger Graham




Barlick View
stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
Cathy
Senior Member


4249 Posts
Posted - 23/07/2011 : 11:01

Bradders your dampen down with a sexual connotation might mean
'with cold water' as in a cold shower.  When I think of damp I always think of cold.


All thru the fields and meadows gay  ....  Enjoy   
Take Care...Cathy Go to Top of Page
tripps
Senior Member


1404 Posts
Posted - 23/07/2011 : 11:39
"Preston Guild used to be every 20 years "
Still is - and yes the next one is 2012.    Dampf is German slang for smoking.


Go to Top of Page
Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 23/07/2011 : 16:57
Brad, you reminded me of this lady:

 

Alberta Hunter, the sexiest lady I ever met. Find the lyric to her somg 'A Good Man is Hard to Find'. "He rakes my ashes and trims my front lawn". I mean, Really!! Do you remember the Peter Cook and Dud Moore take-off, 'Momma's got a brand new bag and she's grooving it all night long'?


Stanley Challenger Graham




Barlick View
stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
Bradders
Senior Member


1880 Posts
Posted - 23/07/2011 : 18:39


quote:
Stanley wrote:
Brad, you reminded me of this lady:

 

Alberta Hunter, the sexiest lady I ever met.
Ha ha, I look nothing like her . Oh but hold on a minute.........now you come to mention it.

(I know that's not what  you meant , but I couldn't resist )

The mention  of "ashes" and " getting ashes hauled" is often found in real blues music and is always a euphemism for orgasmic sex.......

Where did you meet Alberta , I'd love to know. ?

Edited by - Bradders on 23/07/2011 8:03:04 PM


BRADDERS BLUESINGER Go to Top of Page
Topic is 40 Pages Long:
Go to Page
  First Page  Previous Page    20  21  22  [23]  24  25   Next Page  Last Page
 


Set us as your default homepage Bookmark us Privacy   Copyright 2004-2011 www.oneguyfrombarlick.co.uk All Rights Reserved. Design by: Frost SkyPortal.net Go To Top Of Page

Page load time - 0.594