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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted -  22/06/2007  :  10:00
WE ARE WHAT WE EAT 2007

 I have shifted the intro to the body of the topic.


Stanley Challenger Graham




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stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk
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Tizer
VIP Member


5150 Posts
Posted - 20/05/2011 : 09:17
Belle, Stanley, we eat lots of chicken here (free range) and, like us, you can eat it without worry because you've got the sense to (a) cook it properly and (b) be careful with handling (not using the same chopping board for raw chicken and then salad, and washing hands after handling raw chicken). The troubles come with all those people who are too lazy or slapdash to do it properly.

Belle, welcome to the club! I hardly ever `eat out' because there are so many things that upset my inflamed gut. More seriously, I sympathise with you - it really does affect your lifestyle.


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Callunna
Revolving Grey Blob


3044 Posts
Posted - 20/05/2011 : 09:37
Speaking of chickens - which I don't often do, being a veggie - I just thought I'd pass on a discovery I made yesterday. No doubt many people already know about it but in case someone doesn't, here goes.

There's nowt nicer than a nice egg teacake (or muffin if you're not a Barlicker) but it's healthier to have a poached rather than fried egg. However, poaching can be quite a hit and miss affair (well it is for me...) having to use a special poaching pan or swirling the water and dropping the egg in (disastrous!)

Instead you can get a small pyrex bowl with a lid, drop in an egg, pierce the yolk carefully with the tip of a sharp knife (just a small amount so that it doesn't seep out), put the lid on and microwave it for 1 - 2 minutes (depending on your oven and whether you like the yolk soft or hard). So long as you've pierced the egg, it won't explode.

When done, it doesn't stick to the dish and you have a healthy alternative to a fried egg which comes out neat and round because it's been done in a small circular bowl.


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belle
VIP Member


6502 Posts
Posted - 20/05/2011 : 11:34
Stanley ....read my post again...first sentence will tell you why porridge is not the answer.
I laughed at my conclusion: rice was the only way forward once I had written it, because it is the most common source of food poisoning there is!
Call i can't stand eggs....


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 21/05/2011 : 06:52
You're right Belle. I have slapped my wrist!


Stanley Challenger Graham




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stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
Cathy
Senior Member


4249 Posts
Posted - 21/05/2011 : 11:16
This is how I cook eggs in the microwave. I use a shallow glass bowl (round / square round) the same size as a slice of bread, add a teaspoon (if that) of butter and microwave for 10 seconds.  Place the cracked egg in, pierce yolk with fork, cover in glad wrap (cling film) and cook for 40seconds.  Done.   


All thru the fields and meadows gay  ....  Enjoy   
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belle
VIP Member


6502 Posts
Posted - 21/05/2011 : 12:50
Sounds simple enough, but I have read somewhere that cling film in a micro wave can give off dangerous chemicals..I'm sure the occassional egg won't be a problem, just if you always use it when microwaving, have a goole about it first!


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 22/05/2011 : 06:03
I always make scrambled egg in the mwave. Works fine as long as you stir it a couple of times while it is cooking.

I've been having a lot of tomato based sandwiches lately, getting the weight down a bit.


Stanley Challenger Graham




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stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
Tizer
VIP Member


5150 Posts
Posted - 28/07/2011 : 10:05
A few thoughts prompted by recent science announcements from the USA...

We generally feel happier with a full stomach but a recent study has confirmed how important fat is for this effect. The scientists used stomach tubes to feed solutions into volunteers. Some were given water, the others a fatty solution. After the feeding, the researchers induced feelings of sadness in the volunteers by playing sad classical music and showing them images of faces with sad expressions. Mood surveys revealed that the participants found the sad music considerably more depressing after watery solution than after the fat solution. MRI brain scans on the volunteers showed the same thing. The fatty solution appeared to dampen activity in parts of the brain that are involved in sadness and that responded to the gloomy music. Now you've read this, just consider how the increased consumption of low-fat foods might have affected our emotional state: no wonder there are so many people on anti-depressants.

A new vitamin, nicotinamide riboside (NR), has been discovered in milk. In laboratory tests, it has shown promise for improving cardiovascular health, glucose levels, and cognitive function and has demonstrated evidence of anti-aging effects. Researchers at Cornell Universityare developing a method of manufacturing the vitamin. Why not halt the decline in milk consumption instead?

Finally, beware products called `superfruits'. This term is being used to promote unusual fruits at high prices as being rich in vitamins, antioxidants and all things wonderful. A few of them might have a different ingredient but most are no better than blackberries, blackcurrants, strawberries etc (which are themselves excellent sources).


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 29/07/2011 : 06:09
Tiz. The thing that strikes me about your post is the fact that those of us who have gone our own way, ie. eat saturated fat, drink a pint of milk a day and ignore reports of some fruits being superfruits (Remember Delia and the Cranberries?) have been doing the right thing all along! I remember a study on the 'satisfaction' effect of the hardest saturated fats because they survive into the lower part of the stomach where they have the maximum effect. That's why a bacon butty is a good start for the day! As I always told my students, the Industrial Revolution was fuelled by saturated fat. It does no harm at all as long as you are working hard enough to burn it off!


Stanley Challenger Graham




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stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
Tizer
VIP Member


5150 Posts
Posted - 07/09/2011 : 09:18
A drink a day 'is good for older women's health'
BBC News, 07 September 2011
"Women who enjoy an alcoholic drink in the evening tend to be healthier as they move into old age, research shows. This nightcap could be a pint of beer, a glass of wine or a single measure of spirit, PLoS Medicine journal reports. A study of 14,000 women concluded that those who drink in moderation were far more likely to reach 70 in good health than heavier drinkers or abstainers. Spreading consumption over the week is better than saving it for the weekend, the researchers say. Women who drank little and often fared better than occasional drinkers. Compared with non-drinkers, women in their mid-50s who drank 15-30g of alcohol (one to two drinks) a day had a 28% greater likelihood of achieving what the US researchers call "successful ageing", meaning good general health free of conditions like cancer, diabetes and heart disease in their 70s and beyond. And women who drank on 5-7 days of the week had almost double the chance of good overall health in old age compared with complete abstainers."
More on this BBC LINK.


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 08/09/2011 : 05:46
It all boils down to moderation in all things and plenty of exercise. Still the best regime! "A little of what you fancy does you good!"


Stanley Challenger Graham




Barlick View
stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
Tizer
VIP Member


5150 Posts
Posted - 05/12/2011 : 10:14
"Revealed: The truth about supermarket 'bargains'", BBC One, Monday, 5 December at 20:30...have a look down the page for the Robinson's drinks special deal where the £1 packs are offered at "2 for £2". It highlights the cynicism of the supermarkets and the gullibility of consumers!

http://news.bbc.co.uk/panorama/hi/front_page/newsid_9652000/9652944.stm


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 06/12/2011 : 06:38
I saw it Tiz and it confirmed my own thoughts exactly. As the man on the prog said "If they are price-cutting how come their profits are holding up so well?"


Stanley Challenger Graham




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stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
Tizer
VIP Member


5150 Posts
Posted - 08/12/2011 : 16:51
An organisation called FLABEL (Food Labelling to Advance Better Education for Life) has carried out a European project of the same name and concludes that: "Despite good understanding and prevalence of nutrition information on food labels in Europe, a lack of motivation and attention of consumers prevents labels from impacting positively on food choices." That doesn't surprise me, but the following statement was interesting: "A big issue affecting the impact of nutrition labels on actual food purchases made by consumers was lack of attention to the nutrition information. FLABEL found that food packages held consumers’ visual attention for very short periods, with the average attention to elements of nutrition labels being between 25 and 100 milliseconds, as measured by sophisticated eye-tracking equipment." In other words the average time spent looking at a label is, at best, a tenth of a second, which is as good as saying no time at all. So, can we do away with labels then? Or do we keep them for one or two folk like me who do, now and then, look at them?


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 09/12/2011 : 04:39
Like you Tiz I always read the labels. Important to realise why there are people like you and me. We have taken the trouble to educate ourselves and understand the basics of nutrition. Labels will not get more attention until many more people do likewise and read the literature. The food processors are not going to encourage this, they would rather keep the pot boiling with pointless arguments about size of type etc. The bottom line is that if the public really understood nutrition and cared about it the food processors would see their market share fall like a stone.


Stanley Challenger Graham




Barlick View
stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
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