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Rossie
Regular Member


847 Posts
Posted -  29/12/2007  :  16:34
As there seems to be quite a bit of artistic talent around here, I thought I would start a pencil sketch section .....


Kalh mera oi filoi mou
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conty
Regular Member


536 Posts
Posted - 28/02/2010 : 13:38
well here goes.... im knackered!! ive got no energy and im going to have a kip in a minute, mum and dad have said 'no more' i have to eat some carbs, not as much as before but i must eat some and my coach agrees. i think hes going to have a word with the nutrionist about it, so ive made up my own mind. im going to try to stay off junk food (chocolate and chrisps) and only eat meat friut and veg with carbs and i am drinking milk when i crave for it, i think my own body will tell me what i need

and dont talk about the puppy!!! she chewed my call of duty game up last night, so shes not in my good books but shes so lovely and cuddly i cant stay mad for long, and thats the only thing shes chewed up (so far) but shes clean, no accidents at all day or night, she asks to go out, so she has settled in really well

im off for my kip, then im going to get some drawing done, might have an update later


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 01/03/2010 : 06:52
Good Lad! I shall stop worrying about your diet now. You are quite right and it sounds as though your coach has his head screwed on as well. A bowl of porridge with sultanas in every morning for breakfast. Tablespoon of the cheapest oats in the shop, handful of sultanas, top up to half a bowl full with milk and then mwave on high for 3 minutes. It'll put a skin on your back like velvet and you won't go droopy! As Susi once said to me 'The body never lies'. She was right and so are you, listen to what it's telling you. There are many health hazards connected with mono-diets like Atkins, look them up on the web.

Every time you get mad with the pup remember that you did the same things to your mum not so long ago!


Stanley Challenger Graham




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Tizer
VIP Member


5150 Posts
Posted - 01/03/2010 : 12:42
With diet it's interesting how often the latest scientific research confirms what your grannie used to tell you to do. Studies of emulsions in the diet are showing that emulsified fat (fats or oils made to mix with water by the presence of  an emulsifying agent) are more slowly digested than ordinary fats. Emulsified fats will keep you feeling full for longer than ordinary fats - and this means you don't eat so many snacks and don't get overweight. One of the most common emulsions of oil and water is milk. Which brings you back to grannie's advice to always have some breakfast and to eat your cereals and milk (besides which milk has some very good nutritional components).

Now another area of recent food science is the preparation of fat-water emulsions using carbohydrate gums to form and stabilise the emulsion. Funnily enough, oats are rich in carbohydrate gums. So it really makes you think, good old porridge made with milk is the food of the gods!


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 02/03/2010 : 05:28
Peter. FROM YOUR MOUTH TO GOD'S EAR!

Funnily enough I have had sausage casserole two nights on the trot and used rice both times instead of boiled spuds or chips as a bulking agent. I never feel hungry first thing in the morning with spuds or chips but have been hungry two mornings on the trot with rice. There has been some very interesting work done on the difference in social development between wheat and rice based cultures. I love prridge and it has the great virtue that I don't feel the need to eat anything until teatime, a great help when you are watching your weight!

Another thing has struck me that I think might be related. I did a BP reading yesterday lunchtime after my walk and noted that I had a lower reading than usual and a higher pulse rate which happens occasionally. At the time I was feeling hungry and a bit droopy. Could this have been because my energy intake was lower because of the rice? I cured it by doing something I don't usually do, I had a snack, a small tin of mackerel fillets, 210 kcalories and almost 5 grams of long chain Omega-3. That cured it! (Yes, I do read labels!)

The other thing about oats is that the cheapest you can get with all the dust in is just as good as the expensive highly cleaned and 'quick cook' varieties. Oats is oats!


Stanley Challenger Graham




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Tizer
VIP Member


5150 Posts
Posted - 02/03/2010 : 11:42
Oats never made it into the premier league with wheat because they don't have gluten (needed for making bread), cannot be milled in a way to get a fine white flour (loved by the rich), and have a higher oil content (more likely to get a rancid taste). So people fed them to horses - which did nothing at all for their image, but the horses were laughing and keeping the secret of how nutritious oats are (I wonder if horses would fare so well on wheat or barley?).

Rice has always suffered from the grain being more difficult to split into flour and bran, which is why it is `polished' instead of roller milled. Polished rice is mostly starch and nowt much else. The alternative is to eat whole rice but rice bran has a lot of oil and goes rancid quickly - once you crush whole rice grain it will go rancid overnight, so you can't store it. The rice-eating populations have had to survive on what is essentially rice starch. The wheat-eaters could use wholemeal flour which lasts longer than crushed rice and has a lot more nutrients than just starch.

Of course another downside to rice has been the need to wade about in the flooded paddy fields to grow and harvest it, which leads to some nasty parasite diseases. Wheat was a lot more user-friendly as long as you had dry soil and you didn't get in the way of the sharp tools at harvest time. (Wheat doesn't like wet weather, which is why we grow it mostly on the east side of the UK; oats grow well in the soggier soils.)


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belle
VIP Member


6502 Posts
Posted - 02/03/2010 : 16:21
Tizer, oats must have something akin to gluten in them as most, though not all, ceoleacs can't  tolerate them any better than wheat.
Here's my tuppence worth Conty...breakfast works best if it is carbohydrate (to balance low blood sugar)..not loads but enough to cure the starvation of a night's sleep, and protein as it takes longest to digest and keeps your blood sugar balanced till lunch. The secret of low carb diets is to make sure you eat lots of fruit, veg, as well as first class protein, and use the carb always in the morning and evening. There is nothing unhealthy about low carb diets if you eat properly, our ancestors lived on meat, berries and leaves, to no ill effect, the problems arise when folk cut the veg and fruit down, or use too many high fat proteins like cheese and bacon. The other great thing about protein is that it isn't possible to eat the same physical amount as you can of carbs.. so you help your stomach stay the right size, rather than bagging it out with bread and chips etc.
Milk is an interesting one.. someone said to me recently "We are the only animals who carry on drinking milk after we are weaned." and a few of my friends who have developed severe intolerance to lactose put it down to too much milk/yoghurt etc in their youth. other's are finding that they tolerate lactose less and less well the older they get. so I would say be moderate with the milk, get your calcium from dark green veg and fish as well.
Most of all don't worry , be young and have fun!


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Tizer
VIP Member


5150 Posts
Posted - 02/03/2010 : 16:32
Belle, the reason coeliacs have problems is that they react to even tiny amounts of gluten protein but there is not enough gluten in oats to have any value in breadmaking. Coeliacs may also be reacting to proteins that are similar to gluten but don't have the physical properties of gluten.


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 02/03/2010 : 16:35
'(I wonder if horses would fare so well on wheat or barley?).'

Cattle will thrive off oats or barley, never seen horses given anything but rolled oats. Just about anything will eat flaked maizem very much like undercooked corn flakes. One very popular way of feeding oats in Scotland (and no doubt elsewhere in earlier times) was to simply give them sheaves straight out of the stack, straw and weeds and grass and all. I have enquired how they digest the whole grain and they seem to manage OK. When I was grinding for cattle in me farming days the way to tell whether you were crushing the barley enough was to keep and eye on their muck, if whole grains come through they aren't ground enough. Essential information for pencil sketches! So there you have it Conor, examine your stool for whole grains!


Stanley Challenger Graham




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conty
Regular Member


536 Posts
Posted - 02/03/2010 : 22:02
wow loads a info, i used to eat porridge all the time with maple syrup but i think i just got bored, ive been eating maple and pecan crunch and i am never hungry till lunch time when i have that, if i have shreddies or something like that by 10 oclock im starving and then eat crisps and rubbish or eat my lunch early. as for the milk i have heard it be said that its not good to drink too much and the same for eggs.
 mum took me to the doctors yesterday about an injury that i am having physio on at the moment, we discussed the diet with him and he said at my age i should be eating carbs, but to cut some out will not effect me but i should not cut them out all together and although i am 6ft 6 i could still be growing so i must be careful just to eat healthy, anyway my energy levels are back up, so that means i must be doing it right now
had gcse exam today and chemistry tomorrow, so back to my revision


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 03/03/2010 : 06:53
Good lad, you are on the right track. When I was picking milk up from farms in 168lb kits we were working at the limit all the time and my breakfast was always a pint of cream off the top of the first kit I picked up. A nutritionist would reel back in horror but he'd be wrong, we were burning it off. Many years ago a doctor told me that the best insurance for health in later life was to work like a horse and eat like one at your age because once you are reaching the stage where you're stopping growing your body starts bulking bones out. This increases the capacity of bone marrow and this is the major factor in your immune system. He could have been right, I have high bone mass and a good immune system at 75. Listen to your body, it never lies.


Stanley Challenger Graham




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moh
Silver Surfer


6860 Posts
Posted - 03/03/2010 : 16:10
Good luck with the exams Conor - did you go to the welcome home for Amy?


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conty
Regular Member


536 Posts
Posted - 04/03/2010 : 07:29
and im listening to you stanley, porridge is in the cupboard!!!

no moh i didnt, i was doing my exams then went straight to my girlfriends house for tea, but i expect she will be in uni today so i might see her later, but i see her around alot training, i might pluck up the courage to say hello!!! LOL


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frankwilk
Senior Member


3975 Posts
Posted - 04/03/2010 : 08:41
Connor
Do you use any supplements ??



Frank Wilkinson       Once Navy Always Navy Go to Top of Page
Another
Traycle Mine Overseer


6250 Posts
Posted - 04/03/2010 : 11:15
Conor, I'm nattering my lad to go to the local athleics club and have a go at throwing.
A few years ago he was local schools champion at shot put  but I think he would be well suited to either discuss or hammer. I watched him the other day throwing a hard rubber ball for Misty and he threw it about 150 metres before it landed.
I knew he had a good arm but  not as good as that. Problem is when does encouragement become persuasion and how much is this me wanting it  rather than him ? He says he will wait until he gets to Uni and see what's on offer there but I'd love to see him throwing properly after some coaching. Nolic 


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tripps
Senior Member


1404 Posts
Posted - 04/03/2010 : 12:26
Missed a good chance to use the word mithering there  Smile Looks like your lad has a big talent since despite unconfirmed reports of 150+ yds throws, the record seems to be  less. Still two years to the Olympics.

Wisden lists the record throw as being 140 yards, two feet (128.60 metres) by Robert Percival on the Durham Sands Racecourse in 1882. It is, however, one of cricket's most disputed achievements.

Carry on mithering.


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