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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted -  14/11/2010  :  06:41
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Stanley Challenger Graham




Barlick View
stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk
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thomo
Barlick Born Old Salt


2021 Posts
Posted - 19/04/2011 : 15:43
A word came to mind last night that I havn't heard for a long time, it may even be in this topic somewhere. On going out to water the garden, A good "degging" was the word I used, I was using a hosepipe but I have several "Degging" cans.


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marilyn
VIP Member


5007 Posts
Posted - 19/04/2011 : 23:09
In response to Bruff's post, where family members take on something that a younger member has said, my stepson (when a little boy) had this 'thing' about houses with lots of windows. He believed that if you had a lot of windows, you were rich. So now if we see a big house or even a hotel with wall to wall windows, we say "They must be rich"....and we all know why we are saying it.


get your people to phone my people and we will do lunch...MAZ Go to Top of Page
Bradders
Senior Member


1880 Posts
Posted - 19/04/2011 : 23:30
Maz ...Your stepson had got it right ...They used to Tax windows !..

Around Bath there is a saying that is a bit like the one about "Painting the Forth Bridge "...(when you finish it's time to start again, etc)....and it's to do with cleaning the windows at Longleat !

Edited by - Bradders on 19/04/2011 11:32:40 PM


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 20/04/2011 : 05:31
Maz, there was a hearth tax as well. One of the peculiar things about the window tax was that certain windows were exempt. I have a pic somewhere of one with 'dairy' written over it so it wouldn't get counted. I'll see if I can find it.


Stanley Challenger Graham




Barlick View
stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
belle
VIP Member


6502 Posts
Posted - 20/04/2011 : 11:43
Think i uploaded window tax info onto here when i first came on..might be worth a furtle!


Life is what you make itGo to Top of Page
Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 21/04/2011 : 06:17
There are some good lists of Land Tax and Window Tax in Barlick that Ken put up. Some inventory lists as well.


Stanley Challenger Graham




Barlick View
stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
Bradders
Senior Member


1880 Posts
Posted - 29/04/2011 : 23:26
Whoopsie Daisy ?......I was thinking about the Gumption Trap !


BRADDERS BLUESINGER Go to Top of Page
Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 01/05/2011 : 06:27
I did it as well.....  Here's what I mis posted on another thread....

'Carrying the can'. Usually taken to mean accepting the blame of getting the dirty end of the stick. Now where does that come from. Anything to do with pail toilets? Come to that, 'dirty end of the stick'?


Stanley Challenger Graham




Barlick View
stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
Cathy
Senior Member


4249 Posts
Posted - 01/05/2011 : 10:57

'Silly Billy' came to mind the other day....   wonder where that originated from and what it means??


All thru the fields and meadows gay  ....  Enjoy   
Take Care...Cathy Go to Top of Page
marilyn
VIP Member


5007 Posts
Posted - 10/05/2011 : 05:19
I was working my way through a crossword on the weekend and kept coming back to solve a four letter word for 'a deadly poison'.
Finally, after working my way around it.....I had found the last three letters to be _ANE. Febby suggested BANE and I looked it up (Wolfbane, Henbane...he was right). I have heard of Wolfbane now that I really think about it, but wasn't aware it was a poison.
Sometimes it is the smallest things that catch you out.


get your people to phone my people and we will do lunch...MAZ Go to Top of Page
Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 10/05/2011 : 05:28
Cathy, according to Brewer's Phrase and Fable it's a nickname first used for William IV.

'Bane of my life' .  You know what the root of that one is now!


Stanley Challenger Graham




Barlick View
stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 15/05/2011 : 04:25
I came across an interesting surname derivation yesterday and it triggered me into a furtle. The name is Stringfellow. I looked in the Oxford Dictionary of surnames and they quote a William Strengfellow in 1286 and give the origin as being rooted in Middle English 'streng' = strong and Old Norse 'felagi' = Partner. We know that the first surnames were often occupation names. The place I came across it was in T S Ashtons 1924 book 'History of Iron and Steel making in the Ind Rev.' (I know, I should get out more!) It turns out the Stringfellow was the occupation name of one of the workers at a bloomery producing a very early form of iron from ore by forging it while it was plastic, they hadn't got the technology to get it to melting point. This is exactly the same technology the Romans and earlier ironworkers used. From the furnace the bloom of iron went first to the bloom smith who did the first forging and then it was re-heated and passed to the 'stringfellow' who forged it again into a more refined bloom fit for the blacksmith to use for making artefacts. So 'strong partner' fits the occupation well and could be a lot older than the 13th century reference and a good candidate for where the occupational name originated.


Stanley Challenger Graham




Barlick View
stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
Cathy
Senior Member


4249 Posts
Posted - 15/05/2011 : 10:35
Walked into my works kitchen one day last week (good size kitchen, with tables and chairs for about 20 people) and saw that there was only one guy sat there having his afternoon tea. I said to him "On your tod then?" He had no idea what I meant and I had to explain it to him.  (Just quietly, I think he's an Aussie... haha.)


All thru the fields and meadows gay  ....  Enjoy   
Take Care...Cathy Go to Top of Page
Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 16/05/2011 : 05:29
Cathy, I've always used that. I wonder what the derivation is? My mind flies to rhyming slang but it's too early in the morning to think of a match.


Stanley Challenger Graham




Barlick View
stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
elise
Regular Member


70 Posts
Posted - 16/05/2011 : 09:24
Todd Malone - Alone


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