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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted -  14/11/2010  :  06:41
New version to make loading easier'

Old topic is HERE


Stanley Challenger Graham




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stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk
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belle
VIP Member


6502 Posts
Posted - 16/12/2011 : 17:51
Predecessors to the modern bicycle included the "dandy horse," which was invented in 1816 by German baron Karl Friedrich Freiherr von Drais de Sauerbronn (1785–1851). His device, also known as a "draisenne," was a two-wheeled vehicle moved by the thrust of the rider's feet upon the ground. In 1839 Scotsman Kirkpatrick Macmillan (1813–1878) added pedals and mechanical propulsion to this vehicle, making it easier to ride.

Also helped the posties deliver quicker!


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catgate
Senior Member


1764 Posts
Posted - 16/12/2011 : 18:44


quote:
belle wrote:
Predecessors to the modern bicycle included the "dandy horse," which was invented in 1816 by German baron Karl Friedrich Freiherr von Drais de Sauerbronn (1785–1851).
That is only part of the tale. What he really did was to take the lightweight movable park bench, invented by Gottfreid  von Lumpenhed, replace the square wheels with round ones and alter the seating position from sidesaddle to athwarts.



Every silver lining has a cloud.


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 17/12/2011 : 05:11
Belle's right Cath, the dyslexia kicked in again! It was meant to be svrubbed. Never mind it kicked Catty off and gave us all a smile!

Catty what is your opinion about the oft-repeated factoid that Herr Auguste Titschlinger was the original patentee of the Playtex bra principle in the 1920s?


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Cathy
Senior Member


4249 Posts
Posted - 17/12/2011 : 09:41
very good Stanley  Surprised


All thru the fields and meadows gay  ....  Enjoy   
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catgate
Senior Member


1764 Posts
Posted - 17/12/2011 : 10:37


quote:
Stanley wrote:
Belle's right Cath, the dyslexia kicked in again! It was meant to be svrubbed. Never mind it kicked Catty off and gave us all a smile!

Catty what is your opinion about the oft-repeated factoid that Herr Auguste Titschlinger was the original patentee of the Playtex bra principle in the 1920s?

Well he has his supporters, but most of them are a bit highly strung.


Every silver lining has a cloud.


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Tizer
VIP Member


5150 Posts
Posted - 17/12/2011 : 11:52
Very good Catty! Back to dialect for a moment - or at least to archaisms. I wonder if anyone still uses `mayn't' as in "You mayn't go out in the rain or you'll get wet". I think I remember also hearing bayn't (spelling?) but I'm not sure of the context.


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Whyperion
Regular Member


122 Posts
Posted - 17/12/2011 : 15:16
Shakespear , Romeo and Juliet , Nurse - he bain't no more than a lad , ( or some such I cannot recall the full quote )

bain't I presume mean be not 


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Bradders
Senior Member


1880 Posts
Posted - 17/12/2011 : 23:30
Yeaterday, My Favourite payfer asked me if my man flu  was any  better.....

Me ...."well ,I'm off the danger list , but it was touch and go for a while ..."

(wonder where "Touch and Go" comes from .....?)


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Whyperion
Regular Member


122 Posts
Posted - 17/12/2011 : 23:42
From

http://www.neatorama.com/2007/07/23/origin-of-familiar-phrases/

{my comment , some of their reported definitions and sources dont look entirely definiative to me }

TOUCH AND GO Meaning: A risky, precarious situation
Origin: “Dates back to the days of stagecoaches, whose drivers were often intensely competitive, seeking to charge past one another, on narrow roads, at grave danger to life and limb. If the vehicle’s wheels became entangled, both would be wrecked; if they were lucky, the wheels would only touch and the coaches could still go.” (From Loose Cannons and Red Herrings, by Robert Claiborne)

 

{Comment , could this also date back to the plague times , when a quick visit was the most one might dare to make to someone whom you might suspect to be infected by plague ? }


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 18/12/2011 : 04:49
Mayn't etc. Come across them both but never used them. Bain't more common and I've heard it used in dialect round here but a long time ago.


Stanley Challenger Graham




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belle
VIP Member


6502 Posts
Posted - 18/12/2011 : 11:45
Have also heard both mayn't and baint being used...slightly different I still use shant which seems to have fallen out of favour so I get odd looks from the kids!

P.s I see Stanley and Catty are keeping abreast of the inventions history..sorry couldn't resist it!

Edited by - belle on 18/12/2011 11:47:17 AM


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Tizer
VIP Member


5150 Posts
Posted - 18/12/2011 : 11:55
Stagecoach drivers...the mail coaches changed horses about every 8 miles, many of these changes were at inns and the drivers were often drunk even though it was a very serious offence to be drunk in charge of the mail. They also got in trouble for driving with the mailbox open and for being without a firearm. So they were often drunk and carrying a gun too. Road rage must have even more dangerous in those days!

Edited by - Tizer on 18/12/2011 11:56:08


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Whyperion
Regular Member


122 Posts
Posted - 18/12/2011 : 13:26
http://www.egmont.co.uk/common/upload/book/assets/9781405230285-chaptersampler.pdf

Page 8 of the book  , I shan't be able to sleep tonight


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Whyperion
Regular Member


122 Posts
Posted - 18/12/2011 : 13:41
I think technically Stagecoaches ( for the conveyance of persons with scheduled stops and breaks in journey for benefit of passengers ) and mail coaches ( non stop effectively for fast conveyance of mails ) are different things

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b017x3pj

Being The Peoples Post , A Narrative History of the Post Office , Episode 4 of 15 : The Mail Coach


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belle
VIP Member


6502 Posts
Posted - 18/12/2011 : 15:20
Wipers, I am afraid your link caused my internet to shut down so I wasn't sure what it had to with dialect ????  


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