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melteaser
Genealogist


4819 Posts
Posted -  10/11/2008  :  08:52
I've just acquired a White treadle sewing machine, manufacture date is c.1890. It's a lovely piece of furniture that will eventually go to Picard.
The wooden cabinet could do with a bit of work but I'm not sure how to go about it and wondered if anyone on here might have any pointers. The sensible side of me says 'get it done properly/professionally' but the have a go side says 'diy'.
I'll take some pictures later, basically the wood looks to be dried out in places and faded from sunlight. The top of the cabinet has the 'White' logo painted(?) on so I want to save this as I think it is a nice feature.
Any suggestions what I should do/use?
Off to find the camera now.


Mel


http://www.briercliffesociety.co.uk
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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 11/11/2008 : 07:54
Mel, when in doubt over old furniture the best advice is to do as little as possible.  Temember Arthur Negus going on about Patina?You can't go wrong with feeding the wood with wax once it is clean.

A White steam car was the first land vehicle to exceed 100 mph I think.


Stanley Challenger Graham




Barlick View
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moh
Silver Surfer


6860 Posts
Posted - 11/11/2008 : 09:43
It had some attention by a restorer in Essex when Diane lived there and it was lovely, unfortunately it has been in front of a bay window since she moved back north a good few years ago.


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softsuvner
Regular Member


604 Posts
Posted - 11/11/2008 : 15:36
Pure beeswax polish will feed the wood and do it no harm.

Stanley, the steam car record ( 127 mph in 1906) wasn't set by a White.....................  but by a Stanley !

Malcolm 


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 11/11/2008 : 16:43
You're right, the Stanley Steamer.  I once saw an instruction book and the first thing you did to start one was jack the back axle up so you could turn the wheels to de-water the cylinders while it was warming up.....


Stanley Challenger Graham




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blokman
Senior Member


1120 Posts
Posted - 11/11/2008 : 17:14
Just to add what the others have said, don't strip it, you will lose all the character that has built up over the years, beeswax polish, definitely not a polish containing silicone, gently rub it in with a fine wire wool, then buff off with a soft cloth.
As Stanley says, this wax will feed the wood and hopefully prevent any more splitting, which has probably occurred due to sunlight exposure..


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Sue
Senior Member


4201 Posts
Posted - 11/11/2008 : 17:19
It was avery gentle stripper that I recommended, it was specifically for restoring furniture and had been recommended to us.It did not remove the patina at all.It was really only a cleaner for the dirty old wax. The beeswax was the main part of the treatment and a GOOD hard buff up. If you want any repairs doing Mel you really need to go to a reputable firm specialising in such restoration

Sue


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blokman
Senior Member


1120 Posts
Posted - 11/11/2008 : 18:34
Sue, I think they are called a soft finish remover, just lifts off the "sticky" dirt build up.

I think ronseal do a range of these renovation products..


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Anni
Regular Member


634 Posts
Posted - 11/11/2008 : 19:31
These tips are really useful to me - I have a beautiful old sideboard which needs all the wax build up removing.  I have had it for 14 years and have never dared do anything with it other than dust Laughing


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 12/11/2008 : 06:37
On a slightly different matter, if you ever want to feed old oak beams that are clean just paint them with linseed oil and vinegar. You have to keep shaking the mixture up as it doesn't emusify but when it has dried in it's a lovely finish.  Billy Entwistle told me this when we did Hey farm up and it worked a treat.


Stanley Challenger Graham




Barlick View
stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
melteaser
Genealogist


4819 Posts
Posted - 12/11/2008 : 07:23
I'll have a look around to see what I can find and give it a go. My concern with going to a professional is the typical car mechanic talking to a woman scenario. This is completely new territory for me and I don't want to get baffled (and ripped off) by professional speak.

As for oak beams - we have a couple of those at Picard. We have a door frame of oak which the previous owner painted with white paint! Any suggestions for getting that off? We have never attempted it but everytime I see it I can't believe he did it.


Mel


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moh
Silver Surfer


6860 Posts
Posted - 12/11/2008 : 15:13
Plenty of advice there Mel.  - let us see the finished item.


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 13/11/2008 : 09:40
Mel, it depends on what preparation was done in the first place.  If it was a lousy paint job it will be easier to get off.  Try a small patch in an out of sight place with Nitromors and see what happens.  Savage stuff I know but it might do the trick followed by wire brush and finishing with a light sanding. Alternatively just go for mechanical removal like snading it off.  Thing is to experiment and see which works best.  If it was a door you'd remove it and do it by caustic dip and then get some nature back into the wood afterwards.  Nitromors is death to paint, it bubbles up and goes like sticky toffee......


Stanley Challenger Graham




Barlick View
stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
moh
Silver Surfer


6860 Posts
Posted - 03/12/2008 : 13:10
How is it going Mel?


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Sue
Senior Member


4201 Posts
Posted - 03/12/2008 : 13:41
Mel our neighbour in France took the paint of his wood using an electric sander with a wire brush attachment. We are just in the process of painting our kitchen ceiling in France. The oak floor boards had been covered with polystyrene tiles!!! We have taken them down but have little blobs of cement all over the place which we can't get off. We have smoothed them down so are going for the rustic white wash approach. We are leaving the main beams as they are as they are so old and sturdy. We hope the effect will still look rustic and much lighter as the kitchen was very dark

 Sue


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Another
Traycle Mine Overseer


6250 Posts
Posted - 03/12/2008 : 14:05
Moh, she sold it on Flog It last week - paid for a Carbean, Carribbein cruise near the West Indies. Nolic


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