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sandy
New Member


23 Posts
Posted -  05/01/2010  :  23:05
Hi there, im sandy
I have been interested in the local history in the Gruinard and Letterewe area for some time, and have just come across your site.
I have been trying to find out about a drove road in this area and have realised there is a link with  the Birtwhistles of Skipton. I went to Great Close this summer and took photos of it and went to the Skipton reference library to look up the books refered to in the links below, when i had finished harvest work on a farm in Bucks i went to london and saw the item refered to at Kew ( c13 / 791 / 18 ) although it didnt give much new information it listed Indetures going back to the early 1700's and i think before, it mentions names of people, but as it didnt refer to my area i am afraid i didnt write any of them down.
I am aware of the 2 links below.

www.kirkbymalham.info/KMI/malhammoor/greatclose2.html


http://www.settledistrictu3a.org.uk/nchtjournal/Journals/2008/Birtwhistles.html

I am also interested in Meyrick Bankes of Winstanley  1811- 1881( Wigan ) as he was the estate owner here from 1835 - 1881 when his daughter Maria Ann took over till circa 1901, he was an owner of coal mines in his home area ( and others ). 
I was wondering if these names rung any bells with anyone.
    yours
          sandy 
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sandy
New Member


23 Posts
Posted - 26/08/2010 : 18:20
Hi Stanley
I was talking to a friend in England ( I'm more used to the regulations in Scotland ) who has done lots of research  and she was saying that if you arnt part of the established church ( in England) you will be "Non Conformist"  which means you will not be buried in consecrated ground, she also mentioned "Dessenters" which means they will not conform to  the Established Church.
In Scotland you can be buried in the graveyard along with everyone else as long as you havent commited suicide ( or thats the way it comes across to me ) 


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 27/08/2010 : 04:49
Sandy. That all fits with the fact that Quakers and Jews always had separate cemeteries.


Stanley Challenger Graham




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stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
sandy
New Member


23 Posts
Posted - 27/08/2010 : 07:16
Hi stanley
This is not something i have come across before, although she was buried in the cemetery. I will speak to the folk in the archives in Inverness when i get back up there, and find out the difference between Scotland and England in thast respect.
soggy all night in Milton Keynes.


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Stanley
Local Historian & Old Fart


36804 Posts
Posted - 28/08/2010 : 07:10
Scotland different in many respects. I used to spend a lot of time in Scotland in my days as a trucker and was always impressed by the fact that maintenance of graveyards was the responsibility of the local council, even an abandoned graveyard next to a farm I delivered to at Crawford in Lanarkshire. Always tidy and well-maintained. Is this still the case?


Stanley Challenger Graham




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stanley at barnoldswick.freeserve.co.uk Go to Top of Page
sandy
New Member


23 Posts
Posted - 10/01/2011 : 21:42
Sorry for the long gap in replying Stanley, I havent been here for a while Embarassed.
The councils seem to do most of the Graveyards ( old and new) they have a squad that goes round and does them with strimmers and flymos.
I was in the Guildhall Library in November this year and looked for the Drove Road act that was refered to ( 1704 or something like that ) I looked it up in their  Chronological Index ( in case there was evidence given ) but it wasnt listed, sometimes if it isn't in an index they dont know where to look which doesnt help much at times, just means it must be listed somewhere else !
sandy

edit. I also came across an RAF archive near Collingdale in London the chap there was really helpful regarding WW1 planes and the records for the R.F.C./ R.A.F.and was really helpful in sorting or advising with any problems I had in tracing records.
they have their own website.

Edited by - sandy on 10/01/2011 21:48:11


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belle
VIP Member


6502 Posts
Posted - 11/01/2011 : 00:13
On this topic of graveyards and who could be buried in them, whilst researching the Norfolk side of my family I was able to get hold of original chruch records going back to the 1700's or so, the village was so small the book was not even a third filled and the births and deaths spanned three hundred years!  In the 1830's the methodist movement began to emerge in the c of e, and subsequently separated from the C of E to form a different denomination. In the village I was researching in a primitive methodist chapel had been built to accomodate the split in the burials at the time the c of e vicar writes rather ungraciously that whilst he was happy to bury the lay preacher of the primitive methodist chapel in the c of e graveyard he subsequently refused to bury other members of the family who died later...he cites some law that had been passed (I know i should have taken more note!) whic was the 19th c equivelent of "Get your own graveyards!"


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sandy
New Member


23 Posts
Posted - 11/01/2011 : 14:26
Belle, thats quiet a find, I cant go much further back than the late 1700's( OPR)  it starts to get very vague after that.
I went to the Fullham Archive again when I was in London this time and the lady said it was only the Established Church that was buried in consecrated ground.
You sent me a question by mistake ( i take it, it was by mistake and you were meaning to contact Sandie) i sent you a message but dont know if it went ok, I sent her one as well so she could contact you Smile


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belle
VIP Member


6502 Posts
Posted - 12/01/2011 : 00:04
Will look into that Sandy, the only message from you was regarding military badges, was that it?


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sandy
New Member


23 Posts
Posted - 12/01/2011 : 10:18
Hi Belle, you sent me a message on 24/10/2010 and I only logged in here a few days ago, it refered to medals, I thought perhaps you had meant to send it to Sandie but on checking she is into WW1 things.
I went to Kew 2 years ago to try and find out about my grandfather who was given an MBE ( or OBE, cant find my notes on it at present ). I had an obit from the company he was with, he was involved with the manufacture of Glycerine but couldnt find anything on him, I found mention of the "Munitions of War Committee", then the "Ministry of Munitions" and latterly the " Munitions Council", the nearest I got to anything interesting was " Under Lloyd George,numbers of businessmen ( used to administering to large organisations ) were introduced into the Ministry of Munitions to speed production, these men were known as Senior Officials".
I couldnt find a list of who was on the Councils or in charge ect, perhaps I should send Kew a letter and see what the reply is. I believe a lot of the records were lost in WWW2 bombing and water damage Cry 


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sandy
New Member


23 Posts
Posted - 16/11/2011 : 23:06
Can I ask another question in here ?.
I was trying to find out about my Grandfathers brother Eric Rae, he was in WW1 and was gassed and came back to the UK, he is said to have died in Macclesfield circa 1945, I looked for a will in England ( he was born and lived in Glasgow ), he never returned home but stayed in care.
I intend to contact Macclesfield Archives to see if they have any ideas. He joined the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders and later was moved to the  Royal Highlanders ( which I believe is also the Black Watch ).
I looked him up at Kew the other year and he was in the medal roll, I have made a note of "Victory" and "British" for medals. I will contact the Black Watch in Perth to see what they say as the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders have no mention of him and there is nothing in Kew ( except the medal roll ) due to water/ fire damage during WW2.
What I was wanting to ask is was there a soldiers home or hospital for WW1 soldiers in the Macclesfield area. I have looked online and not found anything as yet.
He was born May 28 1896.
Sandy


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moh
Silver Surfer


6860 Posts
Posted - 17/11/2011 : 13:34
Quite a long way from here.


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wendyf
Senior Member


1439 Posts
Posted - 17/11/2011 : 14:58
You could see if there is a history society in Macclesfield Sandy. They may be able to help.


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sandy
New Member


23 Posts
Posted - 17/11/2011 : 19:16
I was following other relatives of the same family who were nurses in London ( training there in 1887 ) as it was pre NHS each hospital had their own records and different rules and training ect, I am half thinking that the same may be true in this case if  this was an independent home as it doesnt appear to come up in a search, time will tell Smile.
Thanks for the comments.


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wendyf
Senior Member


1439 Posts
Posted - 18/11/2011 : 08:16
Neither of these places seem to fit the bill completely, but you never know....
The Lyme Green Settlement
or
Barrowmore




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sandy
New Member


23 Posts
Posted - 18/11/2011 : 16:43
Thanks for looking that up Wendyf, I have no knowledge of that area. Perhaps Barrowmore would be a better bet but I'll wait and see what email responses I get to my enquireys.


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